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Scotland Yard Racism...

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One quick question - from of our list, who would you most like to see on TSR doing a Q&A? 23-09-2014
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    (Original post by najinaji)
    :confused: Why?
    They are not judge, jury and executioner.
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    Are you having a laugh right now? So what you are actually saying is because A is a billionaire, A should be treated better than B, who isn't.
    Let's see if you still feel the same way when you're treated like **** after being arrested of a crime that you perhaps didn't actually commit. Then ask me why.
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    (Original post by geraldbean)
    The black man recorded the police officer saying it, so there isn't doubt of what was said. There is nothing to discuss really. He should certainly be reprimanded and disciplined (not lose his job over it).
    I do absolutely agree that we should have recording devices installed to police cars. I'm sure they do in America. And you can catch all kinds of funny happenings on there too. I'm sure someone would love to make that into a TV show.
    Why shouldn't he be at risk of losing his job? I think the first sign a police officer shows of abusing their power over others they should be threatened with losing their jobs, as it is a totally unacceptable trait in police officers. I agree with what the government seems to be proposing right now, i.e making it more difficult to join the police. That way, we'll get less morons in uniform.
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    Nothing new, the experience I've had with the police.......

    A family is in the force and even they tell me how bad it is and how much **** goes on behind the scenes
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    (Original post by geraldbean)
    After reading the entire article, the police officer comments were incrediiiiiiiiiiibly offensive. What an idiot. But I don't think he should lose his job because of the abuse, there are plenty of other punishments (desk duty for instance, pretty bad if you ask me), but if after the assault is investigated, and there is truth in that, he should lose his job. It's a total abuse of power and there is no argument for that. The police are there to keep us safe, not cause us to fear abuse them.


    http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/ma...?newsfeed=true

    You don't think he should lose his job despite having that attitude? I am a supporter of the police but I don't think he should be doing front line policing when he has an attitude like that. It's unprofessional to say the least and frankly whose to say he might use that opinion of his in his work? Opinions like that don't go away quickly and I'm not sure a front line policeman should stay frontline after comments like that. Be ayse it makes you question their judgment and professionalism.
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    (Original post by whyumadtho)
    They are not judge, jury and executioner.
    They aren't, but I wouldn't treat someone who burns down, smashes up and robs shops with any respect at all, and I don't see why I should. Race shouldn't have really entered into things (though one must bear in mind that a disproportionate number of black teenagers were involved), but if he'd called the looter a 'scumbag' or something like that, it wouldn't bother me in the slightest.
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    (Original post by itsmyname)
    Nothing new, the experience I've had with the police.......

    A family is in the force and even they tell me how bad it is and how much **** goes on behind the scenes
    It's true the world over that the police force attracts a certain personality; that is, ******** men, and bitchy women.

    Generally speaking, of course. There are exceptions.
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    (Original post by JackG1)
    Why shouldn't he be at risk of losing his job? I think the first sign a police officer shows of abusing their power over others they should be threatened with losing their jobs, as it is a totally unacceptable trait in police officers. I agree with what the government seems to be proposing right now, i.e making it more difficult to join the police. That way, we'll get less morons in uniform.
    Well I agree with that, somewhat; and your last two sentences completely. Maybe that's something I need to think about, but as of now I think could at least try and reprimand him in a different way. Possibly in a way so he doesn't have physical contact with the public, such as a desk job.
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    (Original post by najinaji)
    They aren't, but I wouldn't treat someone who burns down, smashes up and robs shops with any respect at all, and I don't see why I should. Race shouldn't have really entered into things (though one must bear in mind that a disproportionate number of black teenagers were involved), but if he'd called the looter a 'scumbag' or something like that, it wouldn't bother me in the slightest.
    Everyone is innocent until proven guilty in a court of law, so should be treated equally until their conviction.
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    (Original post by thunder_chunky)
    You don't think he should lose his job despite having that attitude? I am a supporter of the police but I don't think he should be doing front line policing when he has an attitude like that. It's unprofessional to say the least and frankly whose to say he might use that opinion of his in his work? Opinions like that don't go away quickly and I'm not sure a front line policeman should stay frontline after comments like that. Be ayse it makes you question their judgment and professionalism.
    While I agree and understand with much of what you're saying, if he's sitting on a desk all day doing whatever they do, he's not having any contact with the public! There is nobody to abuse with his opinions. Sacking everybody that makes rude disgusting comments, will only lead to more unemployment, more people on benefits, and possibly even more crime as it's more profitable than JSA.
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    (Original post by whyumadtho)
    Everyone is innocent until proven guilty in a court of law, so should be treated equally until their conviction.
    I'd say witnessing someone hurling a brick through a shop window for example is pretty good proof of their guilt.

    But let's just say for argument's sake that during the riots, a police officer arrested an innocent bystander. Surely, if you were innocent, you would just comply and wait until you're let go in a couple of hours?
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    (Original post by whyumadtho)
    No, I don't know how it is. :indiff: That behaviour is inexcusable and there has been a severe lapse of professionalism that I hope is punished severely.
    Certainly, but you cannot underestimate the psychodrama of the rioting situation, which is a bit like a war. Emotions are running high, the police are aware they may need to use force they aren't used to using. They are trying to tread the line between necessary and abusive action while also trying to actually win tangible control. All this adds up into a massive stressor and the polarisation/dehumanisation inherent in the two sides in a battle doesn't help. That's what I mean by "how it is", and to me it means it's pointless making it into a big issue as it's not symptomatic of anything.

    I am however surprised they don't have recording devices in the backs of police vans.
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    Lmao, the way he started repeating his badge number was brilliant, hopefully this officer gets fired.
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    Everyone is probably going to forget about why the guy who filmed this was actually arrested and he'll get off scott-free for being racially abused whilst the officer will no doubt be serving a sentence.
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    (Original post by najinaji)
    I'd say witnessing someone hurling a brick through a shop window for example is pretty good proof of their guilt.
    It is not their place to determine who is guilty or innocent, but to arrest those who they suspect of breaking the law. This suspicion is either validated or invalidated in a court of law.

    But let's just say for argument's sake that during the riots, a police officer arrested an innocent bystander. Surely, if you were innocent, you would just comply and wait until you're let go in a couple of hours?
    Not necessarily. Hostility can arise from being treated in a manner that is unwarranted, based on a presumption of guilt. People are generally unhappy when they are arrested and detained for something they didn't do and become increasingly angry at the fact that they are unable to leave the premises and continue with their day.

    (Original post by Arekkusu)
    Certainly, but you cannot underestimate the psychodrama of the rioting situation, which is a bit like a war. Emotions are running high, the police are aware they may need to use force they aren't used to using. They are trying to tread the line between necessary and abusive action while also trying to actually win tangible control. All this adds up into a massive stressor and the polarisation/dehumanisation inherent in the two sides in a battle doesn't help. That's what I mean by "how it is", and to me it means it's pointless making it into a big issue as it's not symptomatic of anything.

    I am however surprised they don't have recording devices in the backs of police vans.
    You're viewing the situation from the perspective of the general public, when the police are trained specifically to retain their composure and professionalism in the face of such events. Having an emotional breakdown indicates the person is unsuited to the rigour of the emergency services and should not be in that line of work.
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    (Original post by EggmanD)
    http://apps.facebook.com/theguardian...ding-black-man

    A little problem i have with the whole scenario is wondering why one of the police officers is speaking like the ghetto wiseman from a boys in the hood style film "the difference between a black man a and a ****** is...." which has made me think the cuffed offender might of went down the 'because im black' route..

    Unnecessary of course and totally inappropriate for a police officer to use the word and he should be disciplined on the matter but i dont like making full judgements without the whole story as these snippets can be manipulated.. i think we need a recording facility in police cars and vans as well to ensure this does not happen again.

    When i went to Malasyia the locals called me Gueylo (if i have spelled right) which literally translates to 'ghost man'


    Discuss.
    Gweilo. Chinese word meaning, yes, ghost-man. I lived in Hong kong for a while.
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    (Original post by EggmanD)
    http://apps.facebook.com/theguardian...ding-black-man

    A little problem i have with the whole scenario is wondering why one of the police officers is speaking like the ghetto wiseman from a boys in the hood style film "the difference between a black man a and a ****** is...." which has made me think the cuffed offender might of went down the 'because im black' route..

    Unnecessary of course and totally inappropriate for a police officer to use the word and he should be disciplined on the matter but i dont like making full judgements without the whole story as these snippets can be manipulated.. i think we need a recording facility in police cars and vans as well to ensure this does not happen again.

    When i went to Malasyia the locals called me Gueylo (if i have spelled right) which literally translates to 'ghost man'


    Discuss.
    He said, "You'll always have black skin. Don't hide behind your colour."

    I'm amazed that people are trying to defend and justify this. :indiff:
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    (Original post by whyumadtho)
    It is not their place to determine who is guilty or innocent, but to arrest those who they suspect of breaking the law. This suspicion is either validated or invalidated in a court of law.
    Well technically speaking, yes, but if you were a police officer and you actually saw someone throwing a brick through a window and stealing some trainers for example, you don't think it'd be justified if they got a bit annoyed with them... (ignoring the use of racist words)?

    Not necessarily. Hostility can arise from being treated in a manner that is unwarranted, based on a presumption of guilt. People are generally unhappy when they are arrested and detained for something they didn't do and become increasingly angry at the fact that they are unable to leave the premises and continue with their day.
    I'd have rather been in the safety of a police cell than anywhere else during the riots to be honest with you. It wasn't exactly a fun evening wondering if someone was going to throw a brick through your window and steal your television.
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    (Original post by whyumadtho)
    He said, "You'll always have black skin. Don't hide behind your colour."
    I don't know what the context is for this statement, but from what I can infer, this makes sense. It appears to be a statement about people who get in trouble with the law playing the 'race card'.
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    (Original post by najinaji)
    Well technically speaking, yes, but if you were a police officer and you actually saw someone throwing a brick through a window and stealing some trainers for example, you don't think it'd be justified if they got a bit annoyed with them... (ignoring the use of racist words)?
    Personal opinions and emotions have absolutely no place in the emergency services.

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