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How exactly do national insurance cards work? do they record you're work history?

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    I have never actually had more than 3 days paid employment at the age I am now of 20.
    Reason being is as I have been studying courses at college since leaving school but now I have finished college I felt that the courses I took were a waste of my time, for example I have no certificates from college so no proof of me studying there whatsoever.

    Anyway I was wondering because I have never really had a job when I do eventually get a job and the employer requires my N.I. number if the employer will see ''0 ''work employment through seeing my national insurance card?


    Does the national insurance card record work history for other employers to see or doesn't it?
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    (Original post by Oasis')
    I have never actually had more than 3 days paid employment at the age I am now of 20.
    Reason being is as I have been studying courses at college since leaving school but now I have finished college I felt that the courses I took were a waste of my time, for example I have no certificates from college so no proof of me studying there whatsoever.

    Anyway I was wondering because I have never really had a job when I do eventually get a job and the employer requires my N.I. number if the employer will see ''0 ''work employment through seeing my national insurance card?


    Does the national insurance card record work history for other employers to see or doesn't it?
    No it doesn't record or show work history in this way.

    The card is just a way of giving you the number. The card doesn't save any data. In fact even if you lost the card it wouldn't matter so long as you have a record of your number.

    The data about the amount of national insurance you have paid or been credited with is kept by the NI office in central government. The information is important to qualify for certain benefits and as state pension. Only people who have thirty full years of employment/national insurance credits can get a state pension at the end. The information about all this is kept against your national insurance number which stays with you for life.

    The employer however will usually know if you have been employed before or not because of your P45/P60. If you leave a job then they issue you with a piece of paper showing how much tax and NI you have paid. Your new employer asks for this. If you have never been employed then obviously you can't produce it.
    Your tax history will be pretty apparent to the wages department too who have to process the PAYE for the government.

    It used to be that if you were in full time education between the ages of 16-18 you got two years credits towards your national insurance record but the government have now stopped this.

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    (Original post by catoswyn)
    No it doesn't record or show work history in this way.

    The card is just a way of giving you the number. The card doesn't save any data. In fact even if you lost the card it wouldn't matter so long as you have a record of your number.

    The data about the amount of national insurance you have paid or been credited with is kept by the NI office in central government. The information is important to qualify for certain benefits and as state pension. Only people who have thirty full years of employment/national insurance credits can get a state pension at the end. The information about all this is kept against your national insurance number which stays with you for life.

    The employer however will usually know if you have been employed before or not because of your P45/P60. If you leave a job then they issue you with a piece of paper showing how much tax and NI you have paid. Your new employer asks for this. If you have never been employed then obviously you can't produce it.
    Your tax history will be pretty apparent to the wages department too who have to process the PAYE for the government.

    It used to be that if you were in full time education between the ages of 16-18 you got two years credits towards your national insurance record but the government have now stopped this.

    Thanks and worded greatly thank you.

    SO if I applied for a job at Comet for example and gave the employer my NI number he or she wouldn't be aware whether or not I have been employed before asides the p45/p60 slip ?
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    (Original post by Oasis')
    Thanks and worded greatly thank you.

    SO if I applied for a job at Comet for example and gave the employer my NI number he or she wouldn't be aware whether or not I have been employed before asides the p45/p60 slip ?
    Yes that's so. But if you lied the payroll and personnel department MIGHT discover it later. Unlikely but possible. Depends really how you were employed, what you put on your application form and how tied up the payroll people are to the recruitment people. The tax year always runs from April to April so right now your annual details to the payroll department would detail tax codes for the whole of last year and if you started work right now they would present you with a form that shows all this including past employment at the beginning of April. At the beginning of April this will shift again to be the new tax year with records from this April to next April.

    There are many reasons people have gaps in their CV's though. They could of course have been travelling, volunteering in charity shops and the like, living overseas, caring for a family member or doing part time work which falls below the earned income level for paying national insurance and tax. They could also have been working for themselves in some way which is in a different part of the tax system etc etc

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    (Original post by catoswyn)
    Yes that's so. But if you lied the payroll and personnel department might discover it. Depends really how you were employed, what you put on your application form and how tied up the payroll people are to the recruitment people.

    There are many reasons people have gaps in their CV's though. They could of course have been travelling, volunteering in charity shops and the like, living overseas, caring for a family member or doing part time work which falls below the earned income level for paying national insurance and tax. They could also have been working for themselves in some way which is in a different part of the tax system.

    Thanks, also can a person be prosecuted for lying on their CV if the employer found out? I 'm guessing not but unsure
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    (Original post by Oasis')
    Thanks, also can a person be prosecuted for lying on their CV if the employer found out? I 'm guessing not but unsure
    They would be sacked. It isn't a criminal offence so far as I am aware although it would be if a person were doing it in order to commit criminal fraud of some kind or pretending to have qualifications they didn't have to practice a profession like say pretending they were an experienced doctor.
    Look closely at their contract of employment to check what they say their policy is on this.

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    (Original post by Oasis')
    Thanks, also can a person be prosecuted for lying on their CV if the employer found out? I 'm guessing not but unsure
    Theoretically speaking it is fraud. In reality, all that would happen is that you would be sacked, unless you had pretended to be in one of a number of professions where only people with professional qualifications (doctor, lawyer etc.) can legally claim to be a member of that profession - you don't want to end up like this guy!
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    (Original post by Origami Bullets)
    Theoretically speaking it is fraud. In reality, all that would happen is that you would be sacked, unless you had pretended to be in one of a number of professions where only people with professional qualifications (doctor, lawyer etc.) can legally claim to be a member of that profession - you don't want to end up like this guy!
    OMG! That is an amazing story.... clinical psychologist, barrister!

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