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if you could would you send your child to a private school?

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  • View Poll Results: Would you send your child to a private school?
    yes
    391
    65.60%
    no
    151
    25.34%
    undecided
    54
    9.06%

    • 57 followers
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    Yes, I'd probably consider it.
    • 1 follower
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    Depends on whether they get into a grammar or not
    • 37 followers
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    At primary level, I would almost certainly send them to a state school, so long as it was half decent. IMHO, primary schools are fundamentally there for instilling the 3 R's, basic science and a bit of discipline, so there's little difference between state and private schools.

    At secondary level, the preference would be towards a good state school. However, if that wasn't possible then I would send them to a co-ed private school - no need for anything too fancy (no polo lessons!) but with a good track record at GCSE, A-Level and uni admissions.

    If money was no object, then I might send them to a more expensive private school - but I'd jolly well make sure that they mixed with people from a wide variety of social backgrounds. I still remember the (privately educated) girl of about 15 who asked if I was worried about getting shot in a fairly safe, but working class, neighbourhood :rolleyes: - that's not how I'd want my children to grow up!
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    (Original post by mevidek)
    But the fact remains that the majority of private school students are from very rich backgrounds, and there is much more of a kind of 'elitist' atmosphere there; one of my best friends' sister goes to one of the best private schools in the country thanks to a scholarship, but she gets bullied for coming from a poorer background than the rest of the students. This kind of gap isn't fair, and is another reason why I wouldn't want my children to go to a school where students are treated differently due to their backgrounds - I want my children to go to a mixed school with, as I said before, a cross-section of society. Fortunately the other two alternatives, grammar and comprehensive schools (discounting church schools), have this mixture of backgrounds.
    Honestly, I think you're generalising way too much as what you're saying has been the exact opposite of my experiences, considering the only times I've seen people mocked because of their background has been at state schools. It really all depends on the school itself, the extreme difference in fees and scholarships given are what make each one unique. Regarding your statement that the majority of private school students being very rich, that certainly wasn't the case where I went, but again, that is all down to the school itself. Perhaps I just got very lucky. Although I do see where you're coming from about the cross-section of society, that's definitely understandable.
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    Yes, whilst it is no guarantee of academic success it should hopefully provide more opportunity for them, from what i understand as well as a more structured learning experience and better teacher to student ratios there are usually a better range of extra curricular activities offered, anything i can do to help my offspring to succeed in life i will.

    That is not say i think my children would suffer in state schools, i would have to invest more time personally into enhancing their academic and extra curricular achievements from home.
    • 32 followers
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    Depends on the quality of the local schools. Where I live currently both the primary and secondary schools consistently achieve good standards thus if I remained in the area I'd have no problems at all sending a child to them. If I was living near some inner city dross school I would definitely consider a private school or home schooling with a private tutor.
    • 2 followers
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    home schooled if i can afford it for sure. if not then private ed, but with single sex, i.e. send them to boys only school if they are a boy and if a girl then to a girls school.

    would never send them to any of the schools i went .... bad times .
    • 8 followers
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    If I could afford it, and the state schools in the area were really bad, then yes. If I lived near a grammar school I'd put a lot of effort into trying to get them in there as well though.
    • 44 followers
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    I already did. My daughter has been at a girls' day school for 5 years and loved every minute of it. It's not a hot house (despite being in North London) and I don't doubt for one second that there are state schools within five minutes walking distance that will provide the same times tables, reading level and pass the same tests. But this school is a fantastic environment full of lovely girls that look after one another from year 0 to year 13.

    There is so much more to education than a set of exam results, and the idea that those that go to a state school and get "exactly the same grades" and smugly pat themselves on the back for saving £60,000 are deluded and have no idea what they're talking about.
    • 26 followers
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    Yes, not going to lie. I went to a comprehensive and the education I received wasnt good. They also lacked severly in resources and i was never given the attention that sometimes I needed etc... My younger siblings go to an independent school and they have so many opportunities that I didn't at their age.. i find that the teachers pay so much more attention (obviously you're paying them to) but if a child is struggling they will notify you and it will be seen to. The children are much more accepting and kind. And there's great diversity within the classes, and everyone knows everyone, such lovely environments for children to grow up and learn in. When I'm older I'd like to send my children to private schools too.
    And the bullying side of it, I haven't seen or experienced any from the ones that my siblings go to, not that I am denying such things happen, but I've seen so far less bullying, also the fact that the parents know each other-makes it easier to deal with...
    • 11 followers
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    Yes.

    But due to the focus on universities I'd be tempted to send them to a state sixth form if I knew it got many people into Oxbridge and the private school struggled to get any. Hopefully however this won't be the case and then they would stay at their private (public) school.

    <3 x
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    I wouldn't want my children under that kind of pressure to excel academically. If they're interested, that's great, and they'll do well off their own backs. If they're talented in other areas I'd want to encourage that, not make them feel like if they fail at maths they'll never be good for anything.
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    I have been to a private school my whole education so far and I'm now in my last year. I can't say what it's like to be in a comprehensive, but I can tell you about being in a private.

    The classes are a good size - not too big or small so if you need help, want to get noticed or form good relationships with your teachers, it allows that. Also going to a private school doesn't mean your only friends come from there, which i think people forget. You still have your sets of friends outside of school so all this nonsense about not mixing with a "diverse" enough crowd is nonsense. The teaching is good and there's lots of extra curcurricular oppurtunities available.

    I've enjoyed it a lot, but then again, I may have enjoyed a comprehesive just as much!
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    (Original post by Jackso)
    Honestly, I think you're generalising way too much as what you're saying has been the exact opposite of my experiences, considering the only times I've seen people mocked because of their background has been at state schools. It really all depends on the school itself, the extreme difference in fees and scholarships given are what make each one unique. Regarding your statement that the majority of private school students being very rich, that certainly wasn't the case where I went, but again, that is all down to the school itself. Perhaps I just got very lucky. Although I do see where you're coming from about the cross-section of society, that's definitely understandable.
    I'm not generalising - the truth is that the majority of people are from wealthy backgrounds, and there is less variation than in state schools.
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    No, because I fundamentally disagree with private schooling. I believe that private schools perpetuate an unfair, unequal system as they give a leg-up to the children of wealthy people, while the vast majority of those from more modest backgrounds are left to experience a second-rate education. This means children from lower-income families have to work much harder than those from wealthy families to achieve the same things.

    Although I'd want my kids to do well for themselves, I wouldn't want them to achieve because they had a head-start in life, I'd want them to begin on an equal level to their peers, work hard for themselves, and still succeed.
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    (Original post by mevidek)
    But the fact remains that the majority of private school students are from very rich backgrounds, and there is much more of a kind of 'elitist' atmosphere there; one of my best friends' sister goes to one of the best private schools in the country thanks to a scholarship, but she gets bullied for coming from a poorer background than the rest of the students. This kind of gap isn't fair, and is another reason why I wouldn't want my children to go to a school where students are treated differently due to their backgrounds - I want my children to go to a mixed school with, as I said before, a cross-section of society. Fortunately the other two alternatives, grammar and comprehensive schools (discounting church schools), have this mixture of backgrounds.
    Anecdotal evidence =/= Real evidence.

    I go to a Private school, 30% of my year are on bursaries and ~20% of them are on scholarships. Want to know how I know? School published statistics. Do we actually know who is poor or rich in our year unless we actually go round to other peoples houses etc? No, of course not. Stop being such a snob and understand that wealth is actually a greatly understated factor in the Private school experience. We don't go onto each other about how many helicopters our Dads own, or whose yacht we will be going on this weekend. You are as guilty of ignorantly stereotyping as the people you hate in schools like mine.
    Guess what? Most of my childhood friends go to the local Grammar, just because I go to a private school doesn't mean I am sealed off in a bubble from the rest of society.

    Guess also what? I can go round to my friends house and have fun, and enjoy myself. I don't give a crap how much money his or her parents earn, because most people are capable of understanding personal circumstances, whether in Private school or State school. Likewise they can come round mine, and we can enjoy ourselves there. There are *******s in all forms of school, you will not eliminate that, it is not something that is mutually exclusive to one or the other. Your whole argument of this 'cross-section of society' bull**** is ridiculous, we are not socially incapable of speaking and being friends with people who go to state school and more often than not, we enjoy being in each others company. Background means NOTHING to people in Private schools except *******s, and you will find *******s no matter where you go.
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    (Original post by SpicyStrawberry)
    No. I turned out well after going through state school and even if I was rich, I'd still have working class values so would send my children to a state school as well, as long as it was half-decent and had a good GCSE pass rate. Grammar schools don't prepare you for real life.
    Oh and what do you mean by 'real life' exactly?
    • 34 followers
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    (Original post by MrHappy_J)
    I wish my parents would have home schooled me and I would probably do the same. It's just too terrifying out there.
    I'm not sure whether this is serious or not, but don't you think that's precisely the reason why you should send your children to school (as opposed to home schooling them)? You can't shelter them forever from the 'real' world.
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    (Original post by SpicyStrawberry)
    No. I turned out well after going through state school and even if I was rich, I'd still have working class values so would send my children to a state school as well, as long as it was half-decent and had a good GCSE pass rate. Grammar schools don't prepare you for real life.
    Grammar schools are state schools... And they can have just as many problems as comprehensives.
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    Yes I would. I would also let them know where they came from so they could infiltrate the upper tiers of society, get them to do the ppe degree, into government, then onwards to PM.

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Updated: April 11, 2012
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