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"Ask An American" Thread

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    Firstly; this is a really good thread, thanks for doing it

    Secondly; do you feel that 'class' plays it's part in America as it does in Britain? And when you were here did you notice it at all, and if so what did you think about it?
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    (Original post by AkaJetson)
    What's the general American attitude to Football (Soccer), Rugby and Cricket?
    What's funny is that if you ask most Americans if they watch soccer, a lot will say they can't stand it. But the most played sport (meaning the most played by average Americans) is typically soccer (everyone owns a soccer ball). So it's mixed. I like soccer/football... but that's just me.

    My uni has a rugby team, and a lot of Americans schools do. It's not watched by hardly anyone, but there are people who get into it.

    Cricket... most find it a little strange and boring :P... but some play it/watch it.
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    (Original post by ListenerFriendly)
    Really depends on who you ask. There are so many Americans, and if you ask, some people might not even know what the Gettysberg Address is.

    But for those of us Americans who know our history, it is probably one of the most famous speeches in US history. Mainly because it occurred during the bloodiest war on US soil, and because of it's short, down-to-earth style that Lincoln used. So yea, it's a pretty big deal. Like the MLK's "I Have a Dream" speech...
    Ah cool thank you , just randomly remembered a scene from the Kindergarten cop and the ferret. (There was a train of thought linking all these things together).
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    (Original post by crocker710)
    Firstly; this is a really good thread, thanks for doing it

    Secondly; do you feel that 'class' plays it's part in America as it does in Britain? And when you were here did you notice it at all, and if so what did you think about it?
    Hahaha! Thanks... this sort of thing is always fun.

    When I was in the UK, the traditional class structure seemed pretty evident. It seems to be fading, but I could sense it more than most American cities. There is certainly class in America and it does play a big role (it's playing a big role in this election). But, while the "American Dream" is a wishy-washy concept, most Americans grow up with the idea that they can be anything they want to be if they work hard enough. So I think upward mobility makes the lines between the classes in America more transparent; middle class Americans tend to disregard class a little more than in the UK... but that's just my general impression. I'm sure if you asked another American, it could be an entirely different answer.
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    Ah cool thank you , just randomly remembered a scene from the Kindergarten cop and the ferret. (There was a train of thought linking all these things together).
    Hahaha... that's certainly an interesting train of thought =).
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    What's Americans general view of Tony Blair and David Cameron?
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    i dont care about usa..

    new york is nice??
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    (Original post by AkaJetson)
    What's Americans general view of Tony Blair and David Cameron?
    Good question. Again, it depends on the political persuasion of the American you ask. Myself, as a left-leaning moderate, I tend to link Blair with Bush just because of the wars in the Middle East and the interactions the two presidents had.

    As for Cameron, I think the general consensus is that he's trying, but the British economy isn't an easy thing to fix (and the American economy isn't fun to deal with, either)... I'm not sure if anyone knows whether his policies are helping or hurting. It's kind of an unsure, mixed feeling right now, I think. But everyone loved when he came to the White House a few weeks ago and said he couldn't understand why his ancestors, 200 years ago, had tried to burn the place down. That was a good laugh.
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    (Original post by almalibre11111)
    i dont care about usa..

    new york is nice??
    New York City is New York City... it's big, boisterous, and unlike anywhere else in the world. I prefer London, myself... but New York is awesome, too. But it is a very American city. Maybe more diverse, but very American. If you're not a fan of the US, NYC might not be your cup o' tea.

    But give it a second chance; the US is big and pretty exciting, if you ask me.
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    (Original post by laurentommo)
    Why do you call trousers pants?
    so you can complain about it, which Americans know Brits love to do.
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    (Original post by Pitt1988)
    Do American's understand that the British are the only friends they have in the world?

    Also, do the chicks dig the accent as much as films make out?
    no, no
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    (Original post by ListenerFriendly)
    Aha! The accent. Most Americans love British accents... Of course different people have different reactions, but most will find it to be pretty interesting, and will ask you a lot questions about where you're from, what you do, etc.

    I think it goes back to the British Invasion... 60s music and all really changed popular culture. Also, Oxford and Cambridge... people think if you're British, you're automatically more intelligent. Not all of us are like this, of course, and many have a good knowledge of accents, etc. But you'll certainly get some attention.

    Well, I'm glad to know I'll make an impression on an american just by my accent .I also have another burning question which is how the american education system work. What's with AP classes and people having lunches at different times and all that stuff. It's interesting but strange to me.

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by starfish232)
    Well, I'm glad to know I'll make an impression on an american just by my accent .I also have another burning question which is how the american education system work. What's with AP classes and people having lunches at different times and all that stuff. It's interesting but strange to me.

    Thanks!
    The American education system is pretty different. In a lot of British unis, there is less flexibility built into the degree structure. In most American schools, there is a set list of required classes (often with different options for each required course) that must be taken before graduation. Students schedule their own semesters with their advisors, and get to chose which modules they want to take, which electives, and so on. This is why class times are all very different, and you can be in the same year with someone but they might be taking freshman courses as a senior. This is probably the best thing about the American system.

    As for the structure of the courses, attendance is almost always mandatory with only a few "excused absences." Also, the grade of the class is typically determined by a variety of smaller projects, and less by one major exam or paper. So the world load is spread out more through the semester, which is a good thing, but the load is also a bit heavier. Of course, this is entirely dependent on what school you attend. Just like how schools in the UK differ on difficulty and workload.

    Hope that answers your question =)!
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    (Original post by ListenerFriendly)
    Hey friends!

    I've noticed a lot of threads about particular questions regarding American culture, areas to study, stuff to do, how people perceive Brits, etc...

    I'm an American whose done a lot of travel in the States as well as internationally... I'd love to answer any questions if I could help! I can't tell you anything about specific schools, but anything about Americans, culture, getting around, stuff to do, etc...

    Ask.
    Do you know how well heard of LSE is in the states? How highly do Americans think of it? Do they think its on par with the Ivies?
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    (Original post by Xyrish)
    Do you know how well heard of LSE is in the states? How highly do Americans think of it? Do they think its on par with the Ivies?
    In Economics or similar fields, I believe it is very highly regarded. The most known schools, of course, would be Oxford and Cambridge. But in the minds of most Americans, a degree from any decent UK uni is well regarded, I think. LSE, UCL, Ox, Cam, etc... all highly regarded schools.
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    Love to know what the average American thinks of an Australian? (good question too for the brits on here)

    Just curious how deep that horrible Crocodile Dundee/ Steve Irwin stereotype goes? might be less so for me as a girl, but since I'm going to do my PhD in the UK and then hopefully a post doc in America I would love to know what to expect.
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    (Original post by GoodbyeTuesday)
    Love to know what the average American thinks of an Australian? (good question too for the brits on here)

    Just curious how deep that horrible Crocodile Dundee/ Steve Irwin stereotype goes? might be less so for me as a girl, but since I'm going to do my PhD in the UK and then hopefully a post doc in America I would love to know what to expect.
    there was an Australian guy in my college in the u.s. People always made the stereotypical comments about crocs and kangaroos to him. Not in a mean way, but it probably annoyed him. But if you're doing a postdoc then you'll probably be surrounded be more mature people.
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    (Original post by ListenerFriendly)
    In Economics or similar fields, I believe it is very highly regarded. The most known schools, of course, would be Oxford and Cambridge. But in the minds of most Americans, a degree from any decent UK uni is well regarded, I think. LSE, UCL, Ox, Cam, etc... all highly regarded schools.
    Thanks. Also i wanna ask, in the states, is UPenn (Wharton) or Columbia considered more prestigious?
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    (Original post by ListenerFriendly)
    Hahaha! Thanks... this sort of thing is always fun.

    When I was in the UK, the traditional class structure seemed pretty evident. It seems to be fading, but I could sense it more than most American cities. There is certainly class in America and it does play a big role (it's playing a big role in this election). But, while the "American Dream" is a wishy-washy concept, most Americans grow up with the idea that they can be anything they want to be if they work hard enough. So I think upward mobility makes the lines between the classes in America more transparent; middle class Americans tend to disregard class a little more than in the UK... but that's just my general impression. I'm sure if you asked another American, it could be an entirely different answer.
    On the note of upward mobility thing I think there is opportunity for that here in the UK - at least in terms of access to higher education. However, there might be a difference in actual participation(I'm not sure), if there is that's probably more to do with work ethic than opportunity.

    As others have said, good thread btw. Good read. Shame I haven't really got any questions of my own to ask right now.
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    (Original post by GoodbyeTuesday)
    Love to know what the average American thinks of an Australian? (good question too for the brits on here)

    Just curious how deep that horrible Crocodile Dundee/ Steve Irwin stereotype goes? might be less so for me as a girl, but since I'm going to do my PhD in the UK and then hopefully a post doc in America I would love to know what to expect.
    I doubt you'll have a problem in the UK. There might be a bit of banter but that's just the general British attitude. We have a positive perception of Aussies. More than anything I think it depends on your personality - we had an Australian in my hall at uni last semester and he annoyed me a bit because he was always going on about all the stuff the money his family had let him do and he could be a bit unsympathetic to people who didn't have as much money as he did.

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