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Half Marathon

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    Has anyone ever run a half marathon or a full one?

    Any tips or advice?
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    I ran the nottingham half mara last september and am going to run another one in september (in between shorter 10 mile races).

    I'm not part of a running club, I've tried a few in the past but I enjoy being alone when I run so the training is all down to my own research.

    Although I am no expert by any stretch of the imagination, there are a few pointers I can give you:
    -cross training is REALLY important, simply relying on running leads to injury.
    -a week before the race, don't run, or if you do, make it very low milage. This is a time to carb load and rest.
    -Don't feel you have to do a long run every week, this may lead to exhaustion.
    -websites like runnersworld are really good for getting advice.

    I'm really hoping to do a marathon next year, hopefully the London marathon but am also eyeing up Brighton as an alternative.

    Hope that helps and good look with training
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    Thanks for your advice. I really appreciate it.
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    you're welcome, hope all goes well
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    I ran the Great North Run in Newcastle last September!
    Was significant to me because I lost 5 stone over the year and I couldn't really run half a mile before!

    To be fair, I didn't train hard enough (furthest i had run was 5 miles), and I began smoking a few months before, so things weren't looking up for me.

    I just told myself that there was no way that i wasn't going to do it, and it works! Mind over matter every time.

    Got a decent time too!
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    I've run two half marathons and also done a few longer runs (up to 21 miles) as part of my full marathon training.

    I don't think most people require too much training to complete a half marathon (most reasonably healthy people could walk 13.1 miles), but if your aim is to run the whole thing without stops and aim for a specific time then I'd recommend 6 months' training with at least one shorter race (a 10k or 10 miler) beforehand to get you used to the race atmosphere and format. Mix short/fast/hard runs with longer, slower ones (you can go up to the half marathon distance, but this isn't necessary...my longest run before my half was 10 miles). Cross-training will help too, don't overdo the running (very important- I had problems as a result of overtraining).

    Brighton marathon this weekend- argh! Injured myself last week so have readjusted all time expectations but determined to finish.
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    (Original post by standreams)
    I've run two half marathons and also done a few longer runs (up to 21 miles) as part of my full marathon training.

    I don't think most people require too much training to complete a half marathon (most reasonably healthy people could walk 13.1 miles), but if your aim is to run the whole thing without stops and aim for a specific time then I'd recommend 6 months' training with at least one shorter race (a 10k or 10 miler) beforehand to get you used to the race atmosphere and format. Mix short/fast/hard runs with longer, slower ones (you can go up to the half marathon distance, but this isn't necessary...my longest run before my half was 10 miles). Cross-training will help too, don't overdo the running (very important- I had problems as a result of overtraining).

    Brighton marathon this weekend- argh! Injured myself last week so have readjusted all time expectations but determined to finish.
    I agree, before I knew how to train properly I didn't cross train as much as I should have so just got injury after injury.

    Good luck with the marathon, tell us how you get on, I'd be interedted to know also because I'm thinking of doing it next year.
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    I am training for my first half marathon.
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    Wow! Great advice guys! Thanks so much. I'll try to keep all of that in mind.

    Right now I can run up to 9 miles and the half marathon is at the beginning of next month. I do one long distance run a week and I've been gradually running an extra mile each week so that I should reach 13 by the time of the event. I do cross train every other day though or do some steady jogging for an hour. Is that a good plan?
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    [QUOTE

    Good luck with the marathon, tell us how you get on, I'd be interedted to know also because I'm thinking of doing it next year.[/QUOTE]

    Thanks, will provide an update after the event. The last week has been a tough one- injured so been off my feet, eating lots of carbs and so feeling very bloated and sluggish, alternating between extreme excitement and nervousness....emotional highs and lows!
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    (Original post by LDnhu12)
    Wow! Great advice guys! Thanks so much. I'll try to keep all of that in mind.

    Right now I can run up to 9 miles and the half marathon is at the beginning of next month. I do one long distance run a week and I've been gradually running an extra mile each week so that I should reach 13 by the time of the event. I do cross train every other day though or do some steady jogging for an hour. Is that a good plan?
    That sounds good. There is no need to hit 13.1 before the actual event- 10 should be enough. Remember in a race adrenaline will help get you through. Try to do a few shorter, higher intensity runs too (some fartlek or hill sprints). Hill work generally is helpful...it helps build stamina and might help you get a better time. Best of luck, which event are you doing?
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    Yeah, the OP has got this one in her sights.

    Race day tip: do not set off too fast. I have suffered from this race day giddiness. Keep it calm, go within yourself.

    Well done though!
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    (Original post by LDnhu12)
    Has anyone ever run a half marathon or a full one?

    Any tips or advice?
    Yeah I did one in March and it was great fun, but it really depends on when you are planning on running.

    Before I did the HM I considered myself an athletic individual, and I was in pretty good shape. But I got told that I would have to do a lot of training for this and I did. I trained for 8 weeks, usually going out 3 times a week on a run of about an average of 5 miles?

    But if you haven't done one before here's some tips:

    -Buy some decent shoes and good running clothes, but don't bother spending loads on some crappy lycra skintight costume which will promise to make you faster. All you need is good shoes, shorts and a t-shirt. Or whatever you feel comfortable with.
    -Second, choose routes which you know will be safe: that is to say don't run through areas which are known to be dangerous and obviously don't run down directly busy traffic routes.

    -Always stretch before every run. Your warm up is just as important as the actual run itself. Feel free to have a little jog on the spot etc. before and make sure you have any injuries covered/stretched out.

    -When you run, be aware of your surroundings and make sure you know where you are going: twice I've gone the wrong way on a route and ended up miles away lolol. Also, if you have an ipod it is good because it helps to take your mind off the strain on your body and gets you in the mindset. It's also fun to escape from the world but just make sure you can return when you need to eg. when you are crossing a road or other safety related things.

    -For the first 1-2 weeks run 2 times a week and try to aim for 2/3 miles a night to get you into the swing of things. In weeks 2-3 run about 4-6 miles a night. In weeks 4-6 push yourself further and start to watch your diet, but remember it's not until the last two weeks where you really need to take things seriously. In the last week I recommend trying to go at least 10 miles in one night and try for a decent time - really push yourself. And for the race take plenty of water and get a good night's sleep beforehand.

    Good luck and I wish you all the best.
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    (Original post by standreams)
    That sounds good. There is no need to hit 13.1 before the actual event- 10 should be enough. Remember in a race adrenaline will help get you through. Try to do a few shorter, higher intensity runs too (some fartlek or hill sprints). Hill work generally is helpful...it helps build stamina and might help you get a better time. Best of luck, which event are you doing?
    Okay so it seems like I'm on the right track then. I'm doing the OC Half Marathon in California in three weeks. I think I'm going to focus more on my speed until then because I think I'll have no problem with the distance. I'm going to try and finish under 2.5 hours!
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    (Original post by Kiss)

    -For the first 1-2 weeks run 2 times a week and try to aim for 2/3 miles a night to get you into the swing of things. In weeks 2-3 run about 4-6 miles a night. In weeks 4-6 push yourself further and start to watch your diet, but remember it's not until the last two weeks where you really need to take things seriously. In the last week I recommend trying to go at least 10 miles in one night and try for a decent time - really push yourself. And for the race take plenty of water and get a good night's sleep beforehand.

    Good luck and I wish you all the best.
    Thanks for the all that advice! My event is only three weeks away now and I think I'm ready for it. I'll just focus more on improving my time until then. Speaking of water, I've also been told to bring some snacks to eat during the race... I find that weird because I think taking a break to eat will just ruin my rhythm but others have told me the extra calories/energy would help. Do you have any thoughts on that?
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    (Original post by LDnhu12)
    Thanks for the all that advice! My event is only three weeks away now and I think I'm ready for it. I'll just focus more on improving my time until then. Speaking of water, I've also been told to bring some snacks to eat during the race... I find that weird because I think taking a break to eat will just ruin my rhythm but others have told me the extra calories/energy would help. Do you have any thoughts on that?
    I would have something like an energy bar before the race, not right before but about 30-40 mins beforehand. The longer you run for, the more you begin to realise how heavy things are. So having extra weight is not something you'd want.
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    (Original post by puddingandpie)

    Good luck with the marathon, tell us how you get on, I'd be interedted to know also because I'm thinking of doing it next year.
    Well, I did it and hit my target time (between 03.50 and 04.20). Picked up another niggling injury the day before so for a while I wasn't confident I'd even finish, but I finished with a (for me) good time (not under 4 hours...but that was always going to be tough) and most importantly/surprisingly didn't walk a step...the furthest I'd ever gone without walking was 13.1 miles so this was a huge achievement for me! When I realised I had no hope of going below 4 hours I made not walking my objective.

    I'll always remember yesterday as one of the best experiences of my life. The crowd support was fantastic and I enjoyed it from start to finish. Some things I'd advise any runner to do (especially for a long distance race):

    -Write your name on your running vest. I got at least 40 shout-outs and lots of kids wanting high-fives. When the going gets tough, hearing encouragement is a huge confidence and energy boost.

    -Plan on taking on extra carbohydrate during the run. I got through two packs of energy chews and needed every one. Hadn't practiced running with them before but fortunately had no adverse effects. I didn't 'hit the wall' as a result, although I did find mile 19/20 tough.

    -Run for a charity you believe in- it turns doing something for yourself (for self-esteem/the challenge) into something even more worthwhile and highly motivational.

    -It doesn't matter if you don't sleep the night before. I got 1 hour, but energy, excitement and adrenaline got me through.

    -Pack your race bag and get your clothes organised in advance to reduce stress on race day. You need to get rid of any additional stress so you can focus on the day.

    -For me the Marathon didn't get worse and worse as it went on- some miles were hard, then the next were good. It has peaks and troughs and you only really appreciate the highs when you've battled through the lows.

    -Don't underestimate the possible emotional impact of training for and running a Marathon. I'm sure for some people it's just a long run, but for many it means something more and if you're one of those people don't be surprised you experience a bit of an emotional rollercoaster.

    -Unless you are unfortunate and injure yourself, it hurts up to a point and then it hurts no more. Pain is temporary, pride is forever!

    Naturally, I am wearing my medal today in the office and I don't intend to remove it for at least another day. The feeling of completing a Marathon is worth all the inconvenience and pain of training for it...it's just wonderful.
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    (Original post by sevendaughters)
    Yeah, the OP has got this one in her sights.

    Race day tip: do not set off too fast. I have suffered from this race day giddiness. Keep it calm, go within yourself.

    Well done though!
    I've noticed so many people do this and are burnt out half way through. I tend to start slowly and build up.
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    (Original post by standreams)
    Well, I did it and hit my target time (between 03.50 and 04.20). Picked up another niggling injury the day before so for a while I wasn't confident I'd even finish, but I finished with a (for me) good time (not under 4 hours...but that was always going to be tough) and most importantly/surprisingly didn't walk a step...the furthest I'd ever gone without walking was 13.1 miles so this was a huge achievement for me! When I realised I had no hope of going below 4 hours I made not walking my objective.

    I'll always remember yesterday as one of the best experiences of my life. The crowd support was fantastic and I enjoyed it from start to finish. Some things I'd advise any runner to do (especially for a long distance race):

    -Write your name on your running vest. I got at least 40 shout-outs and lots of kids wanting high-fives. When the going gets tough, hearing encouragement is a huge confidence and energy boost.

    -Plan on taking on extra carbohydrate during the run. I got through two packs of energy chews and needed every one. Hadn't practiced running with them before but fortunately had no adverse effects. I didn't 'hit the wall' as a result, although I did find mile 19/20 tough.

    -Run for a charity you believe in- it turns doing something for yourself (for self-esteem/the challenge) into something even more worthwhile and highly motivational.

    -It doesn't matter if you don't sleep the night before. I got 1 hour, but energy, excitement and adrenaline got me through.

    -Pack your race bag and get your clothes organised in advance to reduce stress on race day. You need to get rid of any additional stress so you can focus on the day.

    -For me the Marathon didn't get worse and worse as it went on- some miles were hard, then the next were good. It has peaks and troughs and you only really appreciate the highs when you've battled through the lows.

    -Don't underestimate the possible emotional impact of training for and running a Marathon. I'm sure for some people it's just a long run, but for many it means something more and if you're one of those people don't be surprised you experience a bit of an emotional rollercoaster.

    -Unless you are unfortunate and injure yourself, it hurts up to a point and then it hurts no more. Pain is temporary, pride is forever!

    Naturally, I am wearing my medal today in the office and I don't intend to remove it for at least another day. The feeling of completing a Marathon is worth all the inconvenience and pain of training for it...it's just wonderful.
    Wow, that brilliant, you make me want to run a marathon now!

    It does sound very daunting though running 26.2 miles :eek: but that's just my mind telling me I can't do it when really I know I could.

    Do you think you'll run another marathon?
    Did you train with a running club or on your own?

    Congrats again, its inspirational.

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