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Muslims report mosques who use violence against kids!

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    I remember going to a free Mosque, where the teacher's kids were absolute brats. I used to get hit, because their kids said things about me, and it bloody hurt

    I didn't like them at all. I was only there for three weeks before I left

    Before that, I went to one where they did hit, but at least it was when I actually did something bad, not because the teachers kids decided they had a personal vendetta against you for some weird reason

    Then I went to this place, where I was taught properly and was never hit - perhaps the odd pen throwing to catch my attention, but it was more in jest than any thing else

    Now, I think the majority of the Mosques around my area don't hit, but I prefer the one that I went to last (Well actually, it was my first as well) because all the teachers speak English, so it's so much easier to understand them and it's so much easier to get along with them
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    (Original post by silent ninja)
    I will smack my kids though. Damn right, it's a parent's right to discipline children.
    I think it's far easier, just to take away their material possessions, and having a naughty step as opposed to actually hitting them - at least that way, there's less crying and no one gets hurt
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    (Original post by de_monies)
    I think it's far easier, just to take away their material possessions, and having a naughty step as opposed to actually hitting them - at least that way, there's less crying and no one gets hurt
    I agree with this too- I don't think hitting kids teaches them that much. Showing/explaining to them what they are doing wrong is a better way of making sure they understand why the thing they are doing is wrong. What happens when that sort of negative conditioning isn't there anymore (i.e. when you're an adolescent or adult)?
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    It's strange. When I was around 6 I started to go to mosque and got a tap on the head or whatever like everyone else, or a smack on the head or back if i made a mistake. My Mum thought nothing of it, neither did I, it was just the way it was. :/ But now when I think about it at 17 years old, I realize how wrong it is and my Mum does too. She really doesnt know why she didnt say anything, I think it was because the same thing happened to her. :/

    But im not going to lie, I read Arabic fluently, as well as it made me focus and work hard as I didnt want to be embarrassed. Im not supporting it, but im not saying it didnt benefit me.
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    (Original post by amirlad)
    Bout time! when i was a kid if i misread something it was a slipper if i was lucky, a wooden stick if i was not!
    Ahh the wooden stick. That brings back some painful memories :unimpressed:

    Back in the days when i went to mosque, getting a swift smack on the palm with a stick was considered normal if you stumbled or misread anything, so noone ever thought anything of it.
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    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    I agree with this too- I don't think hitting kids teaches them that much. Showing/explaining to them what they are doing wrong is a better way of making sure they understand why the thing they are doing is wrong. What happens when that sort of negative conditioning isn't there anymore (i.e. when you're an adolescent or adult)?
    By that stage you would've beaten all the disobedience out of them. The Asian people I know all got beats with wooden spoons and other kitchen utensils when they were children but now they love/obey their mums far more than the white/mixed race people whose mums used to negotiate with them instead and spoil them and stick up for them and slag off the teachers when their son got expelled for fighting.
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    (Original post by tsrstar)
    Ahh the wooden stick. That brings back some painful memories :unimpressed:
    And the better memories of hiding the stick
    Oh the thrill of the molvi going nuts when he couldnt find his stick, pen, ruler, or anything else we'd hidden..

    Then he'd pull out a spare :eek:
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    Aw man. We had his:
    Elastic Bands, ooft, he had some aim.
    Hooked cane, to catch us.
    ballpoint pen.
    Leather Bookmark.
    He had these Blue Rings that he used to hit off our knuckles.

    Those were the days.
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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    By that stage you would've beaten all the disobedience out of them. The Asian people I know all got beats with wooden spoons and other kitchen utensils when they were children but now they love/obey their mums far more than the white/mixed race people whose mums used to negotiate with them instead and spoil them and stick up for them and slag off the teachers when their son got expelled for fighting.
    Noooo you don't negotiate, you tell them why they are wrong and punish them in a non- violent way just to hammer it home a bit more (especially when they;re not old enough to reason yet).

    Yeah my grandma (Chinese background) used to batter my dad and his siblings but to a certain extent it hasn't worked. They still act out and stuff as adults, presumably because there's no-one to hit them anymore when they do act out.

    You're generalising again, my mum was never hit as a child and is a wonderful person, as are a lot of my other Asian friends.

    Sure, beating your kids is one way of disciplining them. I personally don;t think it's the best way, that's all.
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    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    Noooo you don't negotiate, you tell them why they are wrong and punish them in a non- violent way just to hammer it home a bit more (especially when they;re not old enough to reason yet).

    Yeah my grandma (Chinese background) used to batter my dad and his siblings but to a certain extent it hasn't worked. They still act out and stuff as adults, presumably because there's no-one to hit them anymore when they do act out.

    You're generalising again, my mum was never hit as a child and is a wonderful person, as are a lot of my other Asian friends.

    Sure, beating your kids is one way of disciplining them. I personally don;t think it's the best way, that's all.
    Is your dad a Chinese Muslim? What about your mother? I know in some parts of China there's large Muslim populations, I remember seeing women in niqabs (Chinese style).

    I am generalising of course but you have to admit that in cultures where parents beat their children parents tend to have more respect and not get abandoned/shovelled into care homes as soon as possible. Obviously there's some parents who go OTT and hit their children even when they haven't misbehaved or hit them until they get bruised but that's more rare. If you hit them when it's appropriate you tend to get more respect in the long run.
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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    Is your dad a Chinese Muslim? What about your mother? I know in some parts of China there's large Muslim populations, I remember seeing women in niqabs (Chinese style).
    No, he's mixed race Malay-Indian-Chinese. My grandmother is half Malay and half Chinese, she was brought up in China though. My mother is just Malay.
    Yeah there are, and the style of food they make is AMAZING! I am yet to find a Chinese Muslim food restaurant outside of China though

    I am generalising of course but you have to admit that in cultures where parents beat their children parents tend to have more respect and not get abandoned/shovelled into care homes as soon as possible. Obviously there's some parents who go OTT and hit their children even when they haven't misbehaved or hit them until they get bruised but that's more rare. If you hit them when it's appropriate you tend to get more respect in the long run.
    Hmm I agree with you that there's less disobedience, but more out of fear than respect. And in Asian cultures, elders are seen as deserving automatic respect anyways, so whether or not they beat the kids doesn;t have much to do with it! The whole shovelling in care homes thing- that's defo a cultural thing. Asians see it as our responsibility to look after our parents when they need it as they looked after us.
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    good atempt trop try and make islam look innocent and dress it up better like you dress up in blonde wig and scratch your bum with your comb.
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    Evidence ,links? otherwise STFU
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    (Original post by NuckingFut)
    And the better memories of hiding the stick
    Oh the thrill of the molvi going nuts when he couldnt find his stick, pen, ruler, or anything else we'd hidden..

    Then he'd pull out a spare :eek:
    Worst still, you'd move your hand just before the stick/ruler made contact with your palm, which resulted in the molvi hitting you twice.

    Noone would dare hide the sticks at the mosque i attended. We preferred to get revenge by throwing the molvis shoes in the toilet.
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    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    How will hitting the kids teach them anything?


    Lol I was moved between various mosques/Qur'an teachers about 7 times, just couldn't find a decent one on Bradford! This was a long time ago now though, I hope they've improved with their treatment of children.
    well i went back to the mosque years later and the ones who used to do it , didn't seem to be there anymore. It wasn't really bad , it was just a stick hit on the hand, but you know that's not how kids learn, or love the Quran
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    (Original post by tsrstar)
    Worst still, you'd move your hand just before the stick/ruler made contact with your palm, which resulted in the molvi hitting you twice.

    Noone would dare hide the sticks at the mosque i attended. We preferred to get revenge by throwing the molvis shoes in the toilet.
    LOL how did you know it was their shoes though?
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    (Original post by silent ninja)
    I don't know any mosques that do this anymore. I asked my nephew if they hit kids he said no but we get told off and Saturday detention lol I was hit as a youngster, it wasn't violent/aggressive just a light smack on the back with a stick or palm, and I think I've benefitted quite a lot from it. I have no complaints about my treatment but I can't speak for others.

    I will smack my kids though. Damn right, it's a parent's right to discipline children.


    parents yes, not bearded nuts in a mosque
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    They must have the right to smack their children to instil discipline
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    (Original post by High VOLTAGE)
    LOL how did you know it was their shoes though?
    I didn't know for sure. Didn't stick around long enough to find out.
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    (Original post by tsrstar)
    I didn't know for sure. Didn't stick around long enough to find out.
    lol still those guys got their tips from some other religion, because that wasn't Islam lol.

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Updated: April 11, 2012
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