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Is is bad to apply for AHRC funding to more than one institution?

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    Hello,

    I'm currently completing my MA and narrowly missed out on AHRC PhD funding for this September. I was shortlisted but got some really useful feedback and got told not to give up, but to reapply next year, which is what I intend to do.

    Anyway, I was thinking about applying to multiple institutions next time round in order to increase my chances of securing funding. However, I noticed on the application form that there was a section that asked if you had applied to other institutions, and I was wondering if this would go against me in any way?

    I emailed two of my tutors and they said it shouldn't be a problem but I find it hard to believe that it won't affect my chances in some way. I'd like to know if other people applying for AHRC funding applied to multiple institutions? If so, what is a reasonable number to apply to? I am aware that each proposal needs to be tailored to a specific department and so applying to more will obviously take up more time. Is four a reasonable number (i.e. not seem too desperate/not taking on too much)?

    Also, do you think it would be useful to apply to one very good institution (for English), then two good institutions, and perhaps one whose reputation is not quite as strong (so maybe less competition?).

    In short, how do I increase my chances of securing funding next time around? I don't think I was ready this year and intend to make a much better proposal for next time, plus I will have a completed master's (I'm currently on track for a distinction).

    Any help greatly appreciated :-)
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    Anyone?? :-(
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    I applied for AHRC funding at multiple unis this year (for English PhDs). At no point was it suggested that I would be disadvantaged by applying to more than one, and tutors at two of the universities positively encouraged it to maximise my chances. Considering the relatively small amount of funding available for arts and humanities PhDs, I think it's pretty much expected. Personally, I'd tend to see applying to multiple unis sensible, while applying to only one may seem a bit overly confident.

    I applied to four (I thinnk any more than that would pushing it), and noted on each application the other places I'd applied for. I got offered funding at 3 of them, and was placed on the reserve list for the other one, so these institutions at least can't have thought it was bad to apply to places other than themselves.
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    (Original post by fifrildi)
    I applied for AHRC funding at multiple unis this year (for English PhDs). At no point was it suggested that I would be disadvantaged by applying to more than one, and tutors at two of the universities positively encouraged it to maximise my chances. Considering the relatively small amount of funding available for arts and humanities PhDs, I think it's pretty much expected. Personally, I'd tend to see applying to multiple unis sensible, while applying to only one may seem a bit overly confident.

    I applied to four (I thinnk any more than that would pushing it), and noted on each application the other places I'd applied for. I got offered funding at 3 of them, and was placed on the reserve list for the other one, so these institutions at least can't have thought it was bad to apply to places other than themselves.
    why? I applied to 6 over all. I am on the reserve list for AHRC at one of them, but other than that I only got one funded offer (not AHRC as I am EU and it would only cover my fees). Most people are lucky if they get one so you should apply to as many as possible to maximise your chances.
    Btw, what subject are you studying?
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    (Original post by *Corinna*)
    why? I applied to 6 over all. I am on the reserve list for AHRC at one of them, but other than that I only got one funded offer (not AHRC as I am EU and it would only cover my fees). Most people are lucky if they get one so you should apply to as many as possible to maximise your chances.
    Btw, what subject are you studying?

    I only meant pushing it in terms of the amount of work you'd have to put into all the applications; should have made that clear, sorry. Although, thinking about it, OP will have finished their master's by then, so in that case I'd apply to as many as possible. Or at least as many as you can without annoying your referees with hundreds of reference requests.
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    (Original post by fifrildi)
    I applied for AHRC funding at multiple unis this year (for English PhDs). At no point was it suggested that I would be disadvantaged by applying to more than one, and tutors at two of the universities positively encouraged it to maximise my chances. Considering the relatively small amount of funding available for arts and humanities PhDs, I think it's pretty much expected. Personally, I'd tend to see applying to multiple unis sensible, while applying to only one may seem a bit overly confident.

    I applied to four (I thinnk any more than that would pushing it), and noted on each application the other places I'd applied for. I got offered funding at 3 of them, and was placed on the reserve list for the other one, so these institutions at least can't have thought it was bad to apply to places other than themselves.
    Wow 3 offers If you don't mind me asking, did you apply mid MA or on completion of your MA?
    The funny thing is, I started the course strong in terms of marks, so I assume my references would have been really good. I'm mid-way now and my marks have slipped to right on the 70% mark and I find this a bit worrying. Am I going to need a really high average to stand out from the crowd? I often get conflicted opinions from my tutors like: 'You should be fine, you're on track for a distinction' then someone will say 'You need to be getting a strong distinction'.

    I actually think all this stress worrying about funding is having a detrimental effect on my marks :-(
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    (Original post by abba<3814)
    Wow 3 offers If you don't mind me asking, did you apply mid MA or on completion of your MA?
    The funny thing is, I started the course strong in terms of marks, so I assume my references would have been really good. I'm mid-way now and my marks have slipped to right on the 70% mark and I find this a bit worrying. Am I going to need a really high average to stand out from the crowd? I often get conflicted opinions from my tutors like: 'You should be fine, you're on track for a distinction' then someone will say 'You need to be getting a strong distinction'.

    I actually think all this stress worrying about funding is having a detrimental effect on my marks :-(
    Mid-MA, although I've heard that applying post-MA ups your chances of funding as the unis view you as a dead cert since they can aready see your final mark.

    While getting the highest marks you can is important, they're by no means the only consideration. A strong, tightly focused research proposal and great references are invaluable.

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