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Report from the Foreign Secretary

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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    (Original post by Morgsie)
    Were not part of Schengen nor the Euro.

    I look forward to seeing your list
    There are a variety of policies that I am talking about and I will try to find a list to make this point clearer. I am not referring to Schengen or the Euro. This Government does not intend to sign up to either policy.

    (Original post by obi_adorno_kenobi)
    Look, mate, this kind of junk language might get Morgise hard but you don't need to employ it with me! "Red tape which unnecessarily holds back the economy" means what exactly? Do you mean the minimum wage? The working time directive? Health and Safety requirements? Or is there something more noxious that you have in mind?
    Working Time Directive is one that we need to look at. Individuals can opt out themselves, but there are certain professions where this is holding people back and hence stifling the economy so I intend to re-negotiate the working time directive. There are arguments against the minimum wage, but that is not my department and so I will not comment further on that.
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    (Original post by toronto353)
    The Common Fisheries Policy, CAP (though I believe that there are reforms coming in during 2013).
    CFP and CAP are being reformed for the period of 2013-2020 (in 2020 it will then be looked at again and adjusted based on what it is like then).

    Both policies are very good just for some reason don't do very well in the UK which I shall be looking into in my role :smug:
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    (Original post by tehFrance)
    CFP and CAP are being reformed for the period of 2013-2020 (in 2020 it will then be looked at again and adjusted based on what it is like then).

    Both policies are very good just for some reason don't do very well in the UK which I shall be looking into in my role :smug:
    Thank you for clarifying that. See I do sometimes read your comments just very rarely

    I look forward to collaborating with you and working in the MUN EU bloc to bring these reforms to life.
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    (Original post by toronto353)
    Working Time Directive is one that we need to look at. Individuals can opt out themselves, but there are certain professions where this is holding people back and hence stifling the economy so I intend to re-negotiate the working time directive. There are arguments against the minimum wage, but that is not my department and so I will not comment further on that.
    Certain professions such as what exactly? Assuming that you believe the public sector does not create wealth, then the working time directive as it is applied to civil servants and so forth doesn't really stifle the economy as such. With regard to the private sector, then, where does this impact to such an extent that you seek its abolishment? Bearing in mind, of course, that the WTD is a 48-hour full-time week. At the moment people are lucky if they get 24 hours on a part-time job. So if you're so Thatcheritely-eurosceptic as to ignore the weak state of the jobs market in pursuit of your anti-European drive then ... you're not off to a good start are you!
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    (Original post by obi_adorno_kenobi)
    Certain professions such as what exactly? Assuming that you believe the public sector does not create wealth, then the working time directive as it is applied to civil servants and so forth doesn't really stifle the economy as such. With regard to the private sector, then, where does this impact to such an extent that you seek its abolishment? Bearing in mind, of course, that the WTD is a 48-hour full-time week. At the moment people are lucky if they get 24 hours on a part-time job. So if you're so Thatcheritely-eurosceptic as to ignore the weak state of the jobs market in pursuit of your anti-European drive then ... you're not off to a good start are you!
    When putting together more detailed proposals of reform, I intend to look at this with my colleague, the Secretary of State for Business and Innovation. Either way, we should bring that power back here so that we can set a policy which is suitable to the UK economy and which is flexible enough to adapt to the changing jobs market.
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    (Original post by toronto353)
    When putting together more detailed proposals of reform, I intend to look at this with my colleague, the Secretary of State for Business and Innovation. Either way, we should bring that power back here so that we can set a policy which is suitable to the UK economy and which is flexible enough to adapt to the changing jobs market.
    Spoken like a true Morgsie-ite.

    What exactly is the difference between an inflexible policy set at Brussels-level to one set at Westminster-level? We accept that national economies are different, I suppose, but what of regional economies? Is the economic base of Ladywood the same as that of Clapham or Brent? Is the economic base of the Central Belt the same as Ceredigion? What of Ulster in comparison to East Anglia? Where does the flexibilty to respond to local circumstances lie exactly? This strikes me as simply more flag waving and bugger all to do with dealing with the problems facing the country.

    Edit: for ****'s sake, I'm starting to sound like a Libertarian.
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    :awesome: Lots of time has gone into this

    Good work
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    (Original post by obi_adorno_kenobi)
    Spoken like a true Morgsie-ite.

    What exactly is the difference between an inflexible policy set at Brussels-level to one set at Westminster-level? We accept that national economies are different, I suppose, but what of regional economies? Is the economic base of Ladywood the same as that of Clapham or Brent? Is the economic base of the Central Belt the same as Ceredigion? What of Ulster in comparison to East Anglia? Where does the flexibilty to respond to local circumstances lie exactly? This strikes me as simply more flag waving and bugger all to do with dealing with the problems facing the country.

    Edit: for ****'s sake, I'm starting to sound like a Libertarian.
    The difference is that this is a policy spread over a smaller area than the EU. The EU has 27 countries and 27 macroeconomic conditions to try to fit in with and each of these 27 states is made up of smaller regions each with their own economic performance. While it may not be great, moving WDT from trying to fit 27 economies multiplied by the variety of regions down to one country with a variety of regional economies, is surely a better solution. Once brought back though, we can look at ways of improving it and tailoring it to regional performance, but you can't do that before you have repatriated this power so your point is rather irrelevant at the moment.
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    (Original post by MacCuishy)
    :awesome: Lots of time has gone into this

    Good work
    Thanks. I like putting these together. It's the second one I've written, but I prefer this one to the other one.
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    (Original post by toronto353)
    The difference is that this is a policy spread over a smaller area than the EU. The EU has 27 countries and 27 macroeconomic conditions to try to fit in with and each of these 27 states is made up of smaller regions each with their own economic performance. While it may not be great, moving WDT from trying to fit 27 economies multiplied by the variety of regions down to one country with a variety of regional economies, is surely a better solution. Once brought back though, we can look at ways of improving it and tailoring it to regional performance, but you can't do that before you have repatriated this power so your point is rather irrelevant at the moment.
    Clearly you haven't grasped my point if you believe it to be irrelevant. I'm not really talking about the merits of "repatriation" but about the motives behind it. Halting jingoistic nationalism is the responsibility of all sane members of the House, after all.
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    (Original post by obi_adorno_kenobi)
    Clearly you haven't grasped my point if you believe it to be irrelevant. I'm not really talking about the merits of "repatriation" but about the motives behind it. Halting jingoistic nationalism is the responsibility of all sane members of the House, after all.
    I would hardly call the policies set out jingoistic nationalism. We must make our economy more competitive and the majority of areas that I want to reform/ withdraw from are economic related as you can see.
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    (Original post by Morgsie)
    An effect of this action, Labour's plan of Renationalisation of the Railways. I have stated EU Law as a reason against this, Directive 91/440

    Can someone explain the Canon Amendment please?
    Where have Labour given plans to renationalise.

    It gives the TSR HOC the power to override all non TSR law.
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    (Original post by obi_adorno_kenobi)
    Look, mate, this kind of junk language might get Morgise
    :rofl2:

    <3 x
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    (Original post by Morgsie)
    Can someone explain the Canon Amendment please?
    Certainly the Canon Amendment states that where EU Law comes into conflict with HoC Law, HoC law wins. I want to reform this further if need be so that where the EU and the RL UK Parliament have both legislated and the HoC has not, then EU law shall be disregarded in favour of RL UK law.
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    (Original post by toronto353)
    I would hardly call the policies set out jingoistic nationalism. We must make our economy more competitive and the majority of areas that I want to reform/ withdraw from are economic related as you can see.
    It's from UKIP, of course it's nationalist in a jingoistic (and intellectually-hollow) way. The British economy is structured along lines that make it inflexible and uncompetitive: we don't make things, we rely heavily on services (including banking and retail), and seem completely incapable of realising our intellectual potential because of a freakish desire to get rid of state-funded research in both the sciences and arts and humanities. That is what makes us weak competitively not the fact that we might like for our population not to work more than 48 hours a week!
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    (Original post by toronto353)
    Certainly the Canon Amendment states that where EU Law comes into conflict with HoC Law, HoC law wins. I want to reform this further if need be so that where the EU and the RL UK Parliament have both legislated and the HoC has not, then EU law shall be disregarded in favour of RL UK law.
    The European Communities Act 1972
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    (Original post by obi_adorno_kenobi)
    It's from UKIP, of course it's nationalist in a jingoistic (and intellectually-hollow) way. The British economy is structured along lines that make it inflexible and uncompetitive: we don't make things, we rely heavily on services (including banking and retail), and seem completely incapable of realising our intellectual potential because of a freakish desire to get rid of state-funded research in both the sciences and arts and humanities. That is what makes us weak competitively not the fact that we might like for our population not to work more than 48 hours a week!
    Then why weaken our competitiveness further by being strangled by red tape?
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    (Original post by toronto353)
    Then why weaken our competitiveness further by being strangled by red tape?
    Because, as I intimated, red tape is a *******s argument. We are weak because of what we do not do, not because of what protects workers from being exploited.
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    (Original post by Morgsie)
    The European Communities Act 1972
    Easily dealt with by the Canon Amendment. EU Law wouldn't supersede RL UK Law with the Canon Amendment changes though. I realise what point you're trying to make, but our changes will mean that the above is effectively redundant. I want to avoid that step and I will negotiate first, but it is a step that we can take.
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    (Original post by obi_adorno_kenobi)
    Because, as I intimated, red tape is a *******s argument. We are weak because of what we do not do, not because of what protects workers from being exploited.
    I agree, but let's not weaken the economy further. My colleagues will be working on solutions to the problems that you have posed, but I am working on furthering our competitiveness internationally and not at these issues.

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