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Would you rather dress well or speak well?

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  • View Poll Results: Dress well or speak well?
    Dress well
    30.11%
    Speak well
    69.89%

    • Thread Starter
    • 56 followers
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    Obviously 'dressing well' is subjective so you can use your own interpretation. However, if you choose this option, hypothetically, you would not speak very well.

    By 'speaking well' I mean pronouncing words properly, softly spoken (i.e. not an accent) and a sophisticated vocabulary. However, you wouldn't dress very well (again use your own interpretation).

    You can only choose one option. Personally, I'd choose 'speaking well' as I'm not that interested in fashion and I wear what's comfortable.
    • 15 followers
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    I'd rather be well-spoken so I could troll people into thinking i'm a tramp then speak the queens English
    • 2 followers
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    What a ridiculous thread.

    Might as well call it: "Would you rather look down your nose at people, or look down your nose at people?"
    • 8 followers
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    Received pronunciation /= speaking 'properly'
    • 12 followers
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    Dress well. I like my accent.
    • 32 followers
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    Speak well, so that I can get fashion advice from someone by 'speaking well' to them :ahee:
    • 0 followers
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    (Original post by (:Becca(:)
    Dress well. I like my accent.
    Location: Chester-le-Street . I don't think others will have the same view. (NOT SRS)

    (Maybe a bit SRS)
    • 21 followers
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    I'd rather be able to speak well (coherently with proper grammar and nice vocab) than dress well (whatever that means) and sound like a complete and utter dunce.
    • 0 followers
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    Speak well. People who cant speak well (say like all the time, use the wrong words, don't enunciate etc) just lose all credibility in a professional environment.

    Plus I've noticed far more discrimination towards regional accents and chavvy ways of talking than what people wear.
    • 10 followers
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    Speak well.

    But whichever option you choose you're screwed if you dont have the other when attending an interview in a professional environment.
    • 48 followers
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    As someone with a brummie accent, not speaking well isn't all that bad.
    I'd rather that than dress like a tramp...

    and some accents are really nice (<3 yorkshire accents)
    • 1 follower
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    There is no such thing as either; both speaking well and dressing well are bull**** terms which have emerged from a superiority complex amongst rich, well educated people (who both speak and dress "well"). Speak how you naturally speak. Dress how you want to dress, only conform when you have to i.e. in a job interview.
    • 1 follower
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    Why would this situation, where you have to choose between the two, ever arise?
    • 42 followers
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    (Original post by Tokyoround)
    I'd rather be well-spoken so I could troll people into thinking i'm a tramp then speak the queens English

    LOL Same. + rep my friend
    • 34 followers
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    I'd rather dress well (by 'well' I mean smartly) because I think you can get away with pretty much any accent if you look smart. Whereas if you use big words and speak with a plum (not that that's necessarily the best way to speak!) but dress like you live in a dustbin, I think you'd look a bit daft.

    This is a really stupid thread though.
    • 5 followers
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    what a ridiculous thread :facepalm:. Both are completely irrelevant to what an actual person is really like, it doesn't make them any better than a person who didn't speak or dress well.
    • 9 followers
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    I chose speak well.
    I don't care about accents, I class speaking well as pronouncing words properly and talking in a way that people understand.
    • 2 followers
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    I pick both
    • 0 followers
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    I see where your coming from, id rather speak well as this is what i currently do, im a student, not a model student but im a great speaker and if the 6th form want a presentation advertising their 6th form then im their man, usually i wear what i normally wear unless im talking to parents but as soon as they here me talk, they already want to enrole at my 6th form
    • 1 follower
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    (Original post by Tokyoround)
    I'd rather be well-spoken so I could troll people into thinking i'm a tramp then speak the queens English
    This immediately made me think of Ian McKellen's character, William, in the film 'Jack and Sarah'.

    'I was here first...'

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