Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Is it still worth pursuing the LPC/training contract? or even attempting?

Announcements Posted on
Post on TSR and win a prize! Find out more... 10-04-2014
Interview discussion rules - please read before posting! 12-01-2013
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Long story short, during 2nd year of university i fell ill lasting approx 12 months in and out of hospital. Third year, out of 8 modules i have to resit 4 exams this months, hence graduating this year.

    During first year, i use to sit in magistrates courts regularly in public gallery, during second year i did a 2 week placement at a local firm, during third year summer holidays i began training at the citizens advice bureaux (which after 2 weeks i left due to my illness). My grades havent been consistent; they are as follows;

    Third Year
    Health Care Law : 66
    Principles of Sentencing: 56
    Law, Media and Popular Culture: 42
    Criminal Law III: 65
    Equity 1 : (resit this month)
    Equity 2 : '' ''
    Law of the eu 1: '' ''
    Law of the eu 2: '' ''

    Second Year
    Contract: 56
    Contract law when things go wrong: 43
    Criminal law: 42
    Land law 1: 58
    Land law 2 : 50
    Law, scienc and society: 60
    Intro to Internatiomal law: 55

    First Year
    Intro to criminology: 40
    Understanding crime: 52
    Key actors in the criminal justice Process: 60
    Criminal Justice-Process, Policy and Practice: 51
    Public Law I & II: 44
    Torts: 50
    Legal Systems: 49
    Legal Skills: 60
    Money Matters: 35
    Critical Thinking: 55

    What shall i do now? Should i leave this route. I have been wanting this from a young age but the big set back has rather dis heartend me and because i know recruiters (majority) have the applications two years in advance, i dont have that option available to me. Shall i commence the LPC this september? Or wait tilll i secure a training contract or leave the entire thing.

    I've worked a part time job throughout my education since the age of 16, till i fell ill. I have experience in dealing with customers. But what i don't know is what to do now? I can go for the LPC, but it's a big investment. I'm not looking for anything extravagant, i'm a modest person. .i.e. magic circle firms etc. Even if it was a tc at a standard firm, i would appreciate this because i'm very unhappy about the fact i have studied for so many years and have come to nothing.

    By the way, initially it was a combined dual honours Law in Law with Criminology, but i dropped criminology in the second year as i was told i would have a qualifying law degree, if stayed on the route and hence i would not be able to practice.

    What are your opinions in regards to what i should do?

    I would really appreciate it.
    Thanks in advance
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    If I were you I'd just go for the LPC. Getting a training contract these days is murder and could take longer than expected, at least at the end of an LPC you'll have the extra qualification you need to become a solicitor and you can look for a TC whilst taking it. Where as if you wait for a training contract it could take a fair amount of time to get one and in that time you are basically making no progress. It's essentially a case of putting your goal of becoming a solicitor on hold until you get a contract or spending the money to do your LPC and actively taking another step forward. Personally I think it's a good investment and that way you don't become disenchanted with the whole thing, if you get what I mean.


    EDIT: Obviously the negs I'm getting suggests tsr doesn't agree with what I said because, well they don't want anyone that's had difficulty to succeed but I stand by what I said. Taking an LPC before you get a TC will show commitment, especially if it's going to take a while for you to get a TC. It takes people up to 2 years to get a TC so what's the point in doing nothing in that time. An employer would be more impressed that you took the initiative to get an LPC whilst waiting for a training contract than not doing anything at all. The reason I am suggesting this is because my big brother who is now on a training contract and has secured a job at a firm when he is finished was in the same position. He had some difficulty during his degree which meant he wasn't able to apply for a TC until after he finished. He then went to do an LPC and at the end of it was offered not one but three TCs, all because he took the initiative to do an LPC.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    hi, I wouldn't say your marks are exactly poor, a number of your modules reflect that you actually put the time and effort into working hard...regardless, there's no denying that acquring a TC is no easy task, even for someone who has loads of experience with top grades. and since your not looking to apply at the top city firms then you may have a slightly better chance in applying at regional/high street firms where you can work your way up and hopefully lead onto better thinsg.

    yup the LPC is a big investment, i'm currently graduating (hopefully) this year, just finishing off finals assessments and exam. i agree with the above poster, although i don't have a TC in place yet nor do i have a vast amount of experience but rather a years worth of local experience, i still think that if you can pull the funds together, you should go for the LPC....will show when applying for TC's that your committed and when going for interviews, perhaps bring up the reasons why you had to retake modules etc etc...if it's genuine then the LPC will reflect your committment to the career.

    but yeah like i said, if your financially able, go for it with the best of intentions, and sure they'l be people out there who will put you down for whatever reasons (people like that everywhere), but if you stick to it, eventually you'l find something and from there things can only get better

    good luck.

    btw just looking through how many modules uv studied =O i thought all u needed to study were the 8 core modules, and the rest electives....seems like u'v covered an awful lot in just 3/4 years...or perhaps they're your criminology modules...
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    If I was in your position, I'd want to have some remarkably good EC's or legal work exp before I felt it was worth taking the gamble. Given the struggles of others on this forum in getting training contracts during a shrinking market, I can't honestly see how taking the LPC would result in anything but financial loss at the moment.

    Not what you wanted to hear, perhaps. Other posters, particularly hmaus, jacketpotato,jjarvis, NT and FMQ may be able to give you a more accurate view.
    • 9 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sabiah)
    Long story short, during 2nd year of university i fell ill lasting approx 12 months in and out of hospital. Third year, out of 8 modules i have to resit 4 exams this months, hence graduating this year.

    During first year, i use to sit in magistrates courts regularly in public gallery, during second year i did a 2 week placement at a local firm, during third year summer holidays i began training at the citizens advice bureaux (which after 2 weeks i left due to my illness). My grades havent been consistent; they are as follows;

    Third Year
    Health Care Law : 66
    Principles of Sentencing: 56
    Law, Media and Popular Culture: 42
    Criminal Law III: 65
    Equity 1 : (resit this month)
    Equity 2 : '' ''
    Law of the eu 1: '' ''
    Law of the eu 2: '' ''

    Second Year
    Contract: 56
    Contract law when things go wrong: 43
    Criminal law: 42
    Land law 1: 58
    Land law 2 : 50
    Law, scienc and society: 60
    Intro to Internatiomal law: 55

    First Year
    Intro to criminology: 40
    Understanding crime: 52
    Key actors in the criminal justice Process: 60
    Criminal Justice-Process, Policy and Practice: 51
    Public Law I & II: 44
    Torts: 50
    Legal Systems: 49
    Legal Skills: 60
    Money Matters: 35
    Critical Thinking: 55

    What shall i do now? Should i leave this route. I have been wanting this from a young age but the big set back has rather dis heartend me and because i know recruiters (majority) have the applications two years in advance, i dont have that option available to me. Shall i commence the LPC this september? Or wait tilll i secure a training contract or leave the entire thing.

    I've worked a part time job throughout my education since the age of 16, till i fell ill. I have experience in dealing with customers. But what i don't know is what to do now? I can go for the LPC, but it's a big investment. I'm not looking for anything extravagant, i'm a modest person. .i.e. magic circle firms etc. Even if it was a tc at a standard firm, i would appreciate this because i'm very unhappy about the fact i have studied for so many years and have come to nothing.

    By the way, initially it was a combined dual honours Law in Law with Criminology, but i dropped criminology in the second year as i was told i would have a qualifying law degree, if stayed on the route and hence i would not be able to practice.

    What are your opinions in regards to what i should do?

    I would really appreciate it.
    Thanks in advance
    Although you have given your module grades, we don't know your university's grading system (particularly with re-sits) so we don't know what degree classification this would amount to. Can you get a 2:1 or is a 2:2 the best you can do?

    Although you might not wish to give the name of your university, is it Russell Group, 1994 Group, other 1960s, ex-Poly, opened last week?
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Although you have given your module grades, we don't know your university's grading system (particularly with re-sits) so we don't know what degree classification this would amount to. Can you get a 2:1 or is a 2:2 the best you can do?

    Although you might not wish to give the name of your university, is it Russell Group, 1994 Group, other 1960s, ex-Poly, opened last week?
    Google tells me that Keele does a course called 'Contract law, When things go wrong (LAW-30048)'. So I imagine it's there.
    • 9 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Are those resits done on a capped @ 40 or you can get full marks for it?
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Ok, my four re-sits which i am doing, are going to be classed as a first attempt. My university's grading is based upon an acgregated mark. Therefore, i need 70% or above in these four modules in order to get a first: after having spoken to one of my lecturer's. Though, having said that, i'm predicting a 2:1, should i not.

    I'm also considering, the LPC at BPP Law School in Manchester to be precise. ?¬

    Thankyou all for your opinions. The majority, are saying go for it and the one not. More opinions please !
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    With respect, only 3 people have yet given an opinion. It currently stands at 2 for, 1 against. Which is not much of a majority to go on.

    I would be absolutely amazed if you are awarded a first with the marks you have so far. How does your weighting system work?

    There are other careers, outside of the two professions, where a law degree would be welcomed. Have you really considered the alternatives?
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    You mention that you have mitigating circumstances for the 2nd year when you fell ill, but what about the 1st year? Your grades are not great for the 1st year either (with a fail in one module and 3rds in others as far as I can tell). Bearing this in mind, is it really likely that the four retakes will drag your grade up to a 2.1? You will know what you are capable of more than me, but it looks like you are heading for a 2.2.

    I would not recommend doing the LPC, but I don't think "wait til you secure a training contract" is necessarily an option. The types of firms you are suggesting you will apply to will not fund the LPC, and moreover, may want to see candidates have completed the LPC before offering a TC.

    I think the real choices are either gamble and do the LPC and hope to secure a training contract later, or else give up on the legal route. I know the latter option won't be what you want to hear, but I think it is a fallacy that high street firms won't want as good grades as MC firms. The fact that they only take on 1 or 2 trainees means they can be just as particular. The only difference is that they may be more willing to look at the whole picture - e.g. mitigating circumstances and excellent work experience.

    Therefore, to echo what someone said above, you need to get some spectular work experience under your belt and I would also say an excuse for your 1st year results (although I don't know whether high street firms ask for module breakdowns from all the years as bigger firms do).
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Do the best you can in your resits, if you end up with a 2.1 then you are still in! If you end up with a 2.2 you will find it harder to become a solicitor but it is not impossible. There is also a legal executive route if you find it more appealing in the end. Good luck. Don't let anyone stand in your way but be sensible about your future!
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kessler`)
    With respect, only 3 people have yet given an opinion. It currently stands at 2 for, 1 against. Which is not much of a majority to go on.

    I would be absolutely amazed if you are awarded a first with the marks you have so far. How does your weighting system work?

    There are other careers, outside of the two professions, where a law degree would be welcomed. Have you really considered the alternatives?
    I was talking about the opinions so far. If its an agregated mark, which we must attain, that gives our classification. I'll break it down;
    FIRST CLASS HONOURS
    An aggregate mark of at least 840;

    OR an aggregate mark of at least 780 AND at least 75 Level III credits all gained from modules with a mark of 70 or higher;

    OR an aggregate mark of at least 780 AND at least 60 Level III credits and 30 Level II credits all gained from modules with a mark of 70 or higher.
    SECOND CLASS HONOURS (Division I)
    An aggregate mark of 720;

    OR an aggregate mark of at least 660 AND at least 75 Level III credits all gained from modules with a mark of 60 or higher;

    OR an aggregate mark of at least 660 AND at least 60 Level III credits and 30 Level II credits all gained from modules with a mark of 60 or higher.

    SECOND CLASS HONOURS (Division II)
    An aggregate mark of at least of 600;

    OR an aggregate mark of at least 540 AND at least 75 Level III credits all gained from modules with a mark of 50 or higher;

    OR an aggregate mark of at least 540 AND at least 60 Level III credits and 30 Level II credits all gained from modules with a mark of 50 or higher.

    THIRD CLASS HONOURS
    an aggregate mark of at least 480.


    PASS
    An aggregate mark of at least 420 with no more than 30 Level III failed credits with marks below 35.

    I meant an upper 2:1 compared to lwer two one.

    And alternative routes? Paralegals etc
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Old Reliable)
    You mention that you have mitigating circumstances for the 2nd year when you fell ill, but what about the 1st year? Your grades are not great for the 1st year either (with a fail in one module and 3rds in others as far as I can tell). Bearing this in mind, is it really likely that the four retakes will drag your grade up to a 2.1? You will know what you are capable of more than me, but it looks like you are heading for a 2.2.

    I would not recommend doing the LPC, but I don't think "wait til you secure a training contract" is necessarily an option. The types of firms you are suggesting you will apply to will not fund the LPC, and moreover, may want to see candidates have completed the LPC before offering a TC.

    I think the real choices are either gamble and do the LPC and hope to secure a training contract later, or else give up on the legal route. I know the latter option won't be what you want to hear, but I think it is a fallacy that high street firms won't want as good grades as MC firms. The fact that they only take on 1 or 2 trainees means they can be just as particular. The only difference is that they may be more willing to look at the whole picture - e.g. mitigating circumstances and excellent work experience.

    Therefore, to echo what someone said above, you need to get some spectular work experience under your belt and I would also say an excuse for your 1st year results (although I don't know whether high street firms ask for module breakdowns from all the years as bigger firms do).

    First year, no excuse. I come from a non-educated background, with no gcse's. I did a level 1/2 btec diploma in uniformed services. Third year i did an access to h.e.Training application came for the police force which was initially my childhood dream. I was told, instead of being 'bobby on the beat' which is the initial three year probationary period for the force, i can alternatively go to university bypassing the probationary period. Once i came to end, because of government funding cuts, recruitment has become frozen for two years. My alternative then became the law - solicitor route. Now nothing. I got ill. My first year of uni was'nt easy; perhaps im not as clever as others and not only that i tell the truth i dont give excuses. Because with one lie you must tell others alike the domino effect. So, probably not the career for me afterall.

    No doubt i will resit my exams and see what i can do. Though, having said that i don't feel very optimistic now; my illusionary world has now become an end on thestudentroom.co.uk : (
    • 13 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I don't have a lot of experience with regional and high street firms because I work at a Magic Circle firm.

    While your grades are not great they are not awful either, so if a TC is what you want then you may well be able to get a TC. I think you will have to judge this one yourself. The best way to start would be to spend some time researching firms in the practice area and geographical location you are most interested in. They may have "profiles" of current trainees on their website that you can look at, you can also look at the job adverts posted on www.legalweek.com to get a flavour of the kind of qualifications that are required.

    The larger commercial firms tend to recruit two years in advance, but many smaller firms recruit one year in advance or recruit people who are on or have already finished the LPC.

    Once you've done the research, the decision will come down to your risk apetitite. Are you happy to spend 10k doing the LPC and gamble that you may or may not get a TC at the end of it, and may or may not get your fees reimbursed even if you secure a TC? If not, you might consider trying to secure work as a paralegal. Paralegal experience would make you more desirable to recruiters and you could try to search for funded TCs while you work.
    • 9 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sabiah)
    Ok, my four re-sits which i am doing, are going to be classed as a first attempt. My university's grading is based upon an acgregated mark. Therefore, i need 70% or above in these four modules in order to get a first: after having spoken to one of my lecturer's. Though, having said that, i'm predicting a 2:1, should i not.

    I'm also considering, the LPC at BPP Law School in Manchester to be precise. ?¬

    Thankyou all for your opinions. The majority, are saying go for it and the one not. More opinions please !
    Since the resit of papers aren't being capped at 40% then I don't see any reason why you can't succeed, just give it your very best shot, EU law isn't that hard..... look up some past year questions make sure you know the changes the Lisbon Treaty has brought in.

    If you get a 2:1, you should be in striking distance of a TC.

    As for other options, I would say instead of worrying about stuff that isn't in your control for now, you should concentrate and put in 110% into getting flying colours with your resits.

    As for whether or not to do the LPC, I would wait for your results of the resits, you just might be able to get a sponsored TC + LPC
    • 9 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sabiah)
    x
    I think a lot depends on you securing a 2:1 or better.

    I cannot spend your money but if you do get a 2:1 I would say do the LPC. It is taking a risk, but a self-funded LPC will open up many more TC opportunities at the sort of level you are looking at.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    So you have no GCSEs or a-levels and look nailed on to a 2:2?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I think you should try to secure a TC before you even think about the LPC, while trying to build up legal work experience and contacts.

    As devils advocate, you have stuggled very much with your degree (even prior to the mit circs). What makes you think you will pass the lpc?
    • 9 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LexiswasmyNexis)
    So you have no GCSEs or a-levels and look nailed on to a 2:2?
    I had a look at the detail of the OP's mark scheme because as presented by her she appeared to have a racing certainty of a 2:1 and a good cance of a first, which couldn't possibly be right.

    What the OP hasn't mentioned is that 2nd year marks only count half (first year marks are, as usual ignored).

    She is currently sitting on 411 points.

    The only viable prospect of getting a 2:1 is the middle qualification

    OR an aggregate mark of at least 660 AND at least 75 Level III credits all gained from modules with a mark of 60 or higher;
    She needs an average of 62.25 from these 4 modules with at least 3 of them scoring at least 60 to get a 2:1. That is possible but a challenge.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sabiah)
    First year, no excuse. I come from a non-educated background, with no gcse's. I did a level 1/2 btec diploma in uniformed services. Third year i did an access to h.e.Training application came for the police force which was initially my childhood dream. I was told, instead of being 'bobby on the beat' which is the initial three year probationary period for the force, i can alternatively go to university bypassing the probationary period. Once i came to end, because of government funding cuts, recruitment has become frozen for two years. My alternative then became the law - solicitor route. Now nothing. I got ill. My first year of uni was'nt easy; perhaps im not as clever as others and not only that i tell the truth i dont give excuses. Because with one lie you must tell others alike the domino effect. So, probably not the career for me afterall.

    No doubt i will resit my exams and see what i can do. Though, having said that i don't feel very optimistic now; my illusionary world has now become an end on thestudentroom.co.uk : (
    Now I'm a bit confused. You said in your initial post that the solicitor route was your dream from a young age and now you say that it was a back-up when policing didn't work out. They are very different careers. If as you say you are "not as clever as others" (and I'm only using your words here, not making that assumption myself) then a solicitor will be a tough career as it is one that demands intellectual ability, excellent written communication etc.

    If policing is something you'd still like to do, why not try and get a job in a civilian post within the police force (admittedly not easy to come by). Then you'd probably need to do that voluntary constable thing for a while as I hear that's essential these days to be considered for the police. They will eventually start recruiting again and if they do you'd be a strong candidate if you're already working within the police in a civilian role.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?

    this is what you'll be called on TSR

  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?

    never shared and never spammed

  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By completing the slider below you agree to The Student Room's terms & conditions and site rules

  2. Slide the button to the right to create your account

    Slide to join now Processing…

    You don't slide that way? No problem.

Updated: April 15, 2012
Article updates
Useful resources
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.