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Liverpool or Nottingham and why?

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Are you at uni? Can you help prospective students with their questions? We're looking for uni forum assistants 19-11-2014
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    I have just received offers from liv and nott and was just wondering what people think of the courses. im paticually interested in if Nottingahams sutton bonnington campus being away from the city centre is a problem and if liverpools facilities are modern and good
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    Best way is to decide for yourself, Nottingham's facilities are first class.
    Get yourself over to Liverpool and have a look around, you should base your decision more around the course structure and which would suit your style of learning best. The facilities are up to scratch at any UK vet school, otherwise the vet school concerned would be shut down/improved.
    I shouldn't think there is a problem with Sutton Bonnington being out of the way at all, especially as there is a free bus to the normal campus anyway...
    The course at Nottingham is the most practical of all the vet schools right from the start, it really depends on your style of learning, as to whether you would like to sit and learn theory for a few years and then re visit the theory when doing clinical, or if you would like to run the 2 alongside.
    Nottingham graduates have had nothing but great feedback from employers this first year.
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    I'm a first year Liverpool vet and am absolutely loving it so far. In first year we have lectures almost everyday, with first semester being around 15-20hours contact time (this includes labs and dissections), and in second semester we have around 6-10 hours so we have more time to revise before our exams. The course structure is traditional, meaning we do biochemistry, body systems, physiology, animals in their environment (farming & equine industries), anatomy of the limbs, animal behaviour, genetics etc. In some topics, clinical scenarios have been integrated in a session lasting a few hours so we can use what we have learned in a clinical context, although we use these to understand the symptoms rather than how to treat. We do, however, mention general classes of drugs and why we use them, though we are not strictly learning how to treat until future years. We also do a lot of dissections (very useful learning tool -- these last 9-5pm) and a bit of histology (microscope work) too. Lectures are very helpful, often replying the same day to emails. Some have also spent individual time with me when I was really struggling with a topic -- if you ask for help and want things explained again, lectures are more than helpful in my opinion. We have days out to our uni's farm & to a local riding stable where we learn basic practical skills on all the most common species -- listening to their heart, temperature, learning where to take bloods, restraint, safe handling etc. If you have extensive experience with all these animals, you will find this basic and not exciting, but if you have not worked with some of these animals it may be quite useful to you. Liverpool is one of the only Unis who owns hospitals in all 3 disciplines -- we have a very busy small animal, equine & farm hospital where we will work in years 4/5 and I believe we also do our clinical EMS there. We also own a dairy, beef, sheep & pig farm. I think this was the major factor which made me apply -- the facilities are excellent and all owned by the Uni (Nottingham only has contracts with other people).

    I am not sure but would Nottingham's course focus more on the usual cases compared to other unis with tertiary referral hospitals? I think that is what they said in their open day when I went. I think, although most of us will be dealing with day to day cases, I do think it is useful to see a large number of complex cases too -- you never know, you might end up in a referral hospital and also it may make it easier to identify cases which could be helped by a referral as opposed to saying it is 'untreatable'.

    I live in the city center next to Uni, thought most students live 10min bus ride away. Taxis around here are very cheap, especially when sharing, for when you return from a night out. The Uni is close to major train stations, shopping centre (Liverpool ONE is HUGE and good for shopping when you have the ££), and all the clubs & bars (of which there are plenty to choose from). Most take the bus/taxi in and get a taxi back.

    Liverpool is a great city -- its accessible from halls, cheap, has a lot of culture (e.g. I really enjoy all the museums & art galleries as I'm an arty person).

    We have a good support network if you are struggling -- you can simply email peer (vet student) mentors in confidentiality if you need it and you are also given a 'buddy' in first year who is a 3rd year student, as a point of contact & advise.

    Any more questions about Liverpool, just ask

    Nottingham does seem more practical based, but that certainly doesn't make it any easier than anywhere else. It all depends on youyr learning style but I personally dont mind if my course isnt practical based. Go to an open day perhaps or maybe see if a Notts vet can comment too so you can get a feel for that Uni as well.
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    (Original post by SilverstarDJ)
    I'm a first year Liverpool vet and am absolutely loving it so far. In first year we have lectures almost everyday, with first semester being around 15-20hours contact time (this includes labs and dissections), and in second semester we have around 6-10 hours so we have more time to revise before our exams. The course structure is traditional, meaning we do biochemistry, body systems, physiology, animals in their environment (farming & equine industries), anatomy of the limbs, animal behaviour, genetics etc. In some topics, clinical scenarios have been integrated in a session lasting a few hours so we can use what we have learned in a clinical context, although we use these to understand the symptoms rather than how to treat. We do, however, mention general classes of drugs and why we use them, though we are not strictly learning how to treat until future years. We also do a lot of dissections (very useful learning tool -- these last 9-5pm) and a bit of histology (microscope work) too. Lectures are very helpful, often replying the same day to emails. Some have also spent individual time with me when I was really struggling with a topic -- if you ask for help and want things explained again, lectures are more than helpful in my opinion. We have days out to our uni's farm & to a local riding stable where we learn basic practical skills on all the most common species -- listening to their heart, temperature, learning where to take bloods, restraint, safe handling etc. If you have extensive experience with all these animals, you will find this basic and not exciting, but if you have not worked with some of these animals it may be quite useful to you. Liverpool is one of the only Unis who owns hospitals in all 3 disciplines -- we have a very busy small animal, equine & farm hospital where we will work in years 4/5 and I believe we also do our clinical EMS there. We also own a dairy, beef, sheep & pig farm. I think this was the major factor which made me apply -- the facilities are excellent and all owned by the Uni (Nottingham only has contracts with other people).

    I am not sure but would Nottingham's course focus more on the usual cases compared to other unis with tertiary referral hospitals? I think that is what they said in their open day when I went. I think, although most of us will be dealing with day to day cases, I do think it is useful to see a large number of complex cases too -- you never know, you might end up in a referral hospital and also it may make it easier to identify cases which could be helped by a referral as opposed to saying it is 'untreatable'.

    I live in the city center next to Uni, thought most students live 10min bus ride away. Taxis around here are very cheap, especially when sharing, for when you return from a night out. The Uni is close to major train stations, shopping centre (Liverpool ONE is HUGE and good for shopping when you have the ££), and all the clubs & bars (of which there are plenty to choose from). Most take the bus/taxi in and get a taxi back.

    Liverpool is a great city -- its accessible from halls, cheap, has a lot of culture (e.g. I really enjoy all the museums & art galleries as I'm an arty person).

    We have a good support network if you are struggling -- you can simply email peer (vet student) mentors in confidentiality if you need it and you are also given a 'buddy' in first year who is a 3rd year student, as a point of contact & advise.

    Any more questions about Liverpool, just ask

    Nottingham does seem more practical based, but that certainly doesn't make it any easier than anywhere else. It all depends on youyr learning style but I personally dont mind if my course isnt practical based. Go to an open day perhaps or maybe see if a Notts vet can comment too so you can get a feel for that Uni as well.
    You will often find that the tertiary referral hospitals are run by specialists, so you would receive training in that specific field before attaining a job there. Nottingham's decision to not have a tertiary referral hospital lies with the case load, unusual cases come to the referral hospitals, in that, first opinion practices are unable to deal with them. Nottingham is contracted as you said, and this provides less time in the referral hospitals but time non the less, they have looked at the benefit of the time spent there. Lets not forget the lecturers are from a variety of different Universities, and the Dean was sub dean of the RVC. So when they sat down and drew up the course, they new what benefited them when they were at vet school as well as what they had to use on day one of real work. Its proven there is nothing wrong with the traditional course, although it is clear to many that a lot of graduates lack practical competence, Nottingham's aim was to combat this whilst still including the Pre-clinical work, but alongside the clinical rather than "Pre" as it were.
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    Thank you so much your information was very useful and helped me finally decide to pick liverpool
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    (Original post by jfarmyard)
    Thank you so much your information was very useful and helped me finally decide to pick liverpool
    https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/139881786141557/

    This is the link to the facebook liverpool vet fresher page!!!
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    (Original post by jfarmyard)
    Thank you so much your information was very useful and helped me finally decide to pick liverpool
    Best of luck in your exams and hope to see you here at one of our socials next year
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    I'm a Nottingham vet student in my first year and I wouldn't have gone anywhere different after being here!
    I got offers from Nottingham and Liverpool, and I picked Nottingham because the course is so much more practical. We have at least 3 hours practical a week (normally 6/7 hours though) and this could be labs, dissection or animal handling. The course is really good, intense but really really good and it's structured really well. We have a small holding on site so we can always go and practise with the animals.
    Living out in the sticks can be a bit of a pain but the hopper bus is once an hour to main campus and free, so you can get to places, and Tescos and everything deliver food.
    I'd go for Nottingham!
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    do people on the veterinary course in Nottingham get to work on the dairy farm on the campus much?
    I'm a little bit obsessed with dairy farms at the moment and I really want to go to Nottingham.
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    (Original post by thedancingchicken)
    do people on the veterinary course in Nottingham get to work on the dairy farm on the campus much?
    I'm a little bit obsessed with dairy farms at the moment and I really want to go to Nottingham.
    I wouldn't let that be your sole deciding factor in which vet school to choose. Not sure about notts, but we've had 2 visits to the dairy farm in first year which took half a day (e.g. condition scoring, listening to gut sounds / heart, etc.).

    You will have plenty of time to work on a farm placement during your PCEMS, and if notts has any "choice" PCEMS, you could choose to do more dairy if that interests you.

    I think a lot of people end up loving whichever place they go to in the end. There are a lot of pros and cons of each place (not just the course structure or uni but also the city you want to live in) and I know its difficult to decide if you are lucky enough to have the choice of more than one option! Good luck in your decisions.

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