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    Hi, simple little question for anyone in the know. How much do Deloitte (or any of the big 4) pay in London Audit? The twist here is I'm not just interested in the starting salary, but in the potential salary going forward. If anyone knows I would appreciate the info! Here is what I know so far;

    Year 1 - Approx 27,500
    Year 2 - Approx 28,500
    Year 3 - Approx 32,000 rising to approx 43,000 once qualified

    Year 4 - ?
    Year 5 - ?
    Year 8 - ?
    Year 10 - ?

    Thanks! :cool:
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    (Original post by M1011)
    ...
    I suppose it would really depend on when you get promoted. Here's a surveyed table for London Audit.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I would assume a manager in Deloitte would also be earning roughly in the 60s.
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    (Original post by overskrill)
    I suppose it would really depend on when you get promoted. Here's a surveyed table for London Audit.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I would assume a manager in Deloitte would also be earning roughly in the 60s.
    Perfect, thanks. A very useful website!
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    (Original post by M1011)
    Perfect, thanks. A very useful website!
    £45k post qualification sounds about right. Bear in mind you can make significantly more if you move into industry; normally upwards of £50-55k and significantly more in some areas.
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    (Original post by Regent)
    £45k post qualification sounds about right. Bear in mind you can make significantly more if you move into industry; normally upwards of £50-55k and significantly more in some areas.
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Regent)
    £45k post qualification sounds about right. Bear in mind you can make significantly more if you move into industry; normally upwards of £50-55k and significantly more in some areas.
    What do you mean by that? Sorry, i don't know much about accountnacy and would like to know more.
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    (Original post by delasandro)
    What do you mean by that? Sorry, i don't know much about accountnacy and would like to know more.
    He means moving from practice (i.e. accountancy firm) in to industry (i.e. a company).

    So for example, once qualified moving to *chooses at random* Tesco and working in their finance department. Simplified example, hope it helps!
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    (Original post by M1011)
    He means moving from practice (i.e. accountancy firm) in to industry (i.e. a company).

    So for example, once qualified moving to *chooses at random* Tesco and working in their finance department. Simplified example, hope it helps!
    Oh ok, I understand. Thanks for that.
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    Do you need to be big 4 to 'move into industry' and earn 45-55k, or can any ACA NQ move into industry and expect at least 50k? Would big firms be highly coveting the big 4 grads? Or most ACA grads? Is it VERY important to be big 4 trained?
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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    Do you need to be big 4 to 'move into industry' and earn 45-55k, or can any ACA NQ move into industry and expect at least 50k? Would big firms be highly coveting the big 4 grads? Or most ACA grads? Is it VERY important to be big 4 trained?
    Well, it's not necessary to move into industry but, having that "Big 4" or other top-tier slot on your CV will send HR into fits and give you more bargaining power, making it a little easier to negotiate your package. Obviously it only gets you so far though as they will have high expectations of you and if you don't meet them you'll be out.
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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    Do you need to be big 4 to 'move into industry' and earn 45-55k, or can any ACA NQ move into industry and expect at least 50k? Would big firms be highly coveting the big 4 grads? Or most ACA grads? Is it VERY important to be big 4 trained?
    Yea as Tokyo said, it's a definite advantage but not a requirement.
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    (Original post by Tokyoround)
    Well, it's not necessary to move into industry but, having that "Big 4" or other top-tier slot on your CV will send HR into fits and give you more bargaining power, making it a little easier to negotiate your package. Obviously it only gets you so far though as they will have high expectations of you and if you don't meet them you'll be out.
    Is it tough to 'move into industry then'. Also, what other things can you do with an ACA, I've heard it's respected across business, but could you give me a few career examples? Possibly involving travel abroad for business. Would Consultancy or insurance do this?

    How difficult is it, do you know, to enter consultancy with an ACA? Not that I'd specifically study ACA just for that sole reason of entering consultancy.
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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    Is it tough to 'move into industry then'. Also, what other things can you do with an ACA, I've heard it's respected across business, but could you give me a few career examples? Possibly involving travel abroad for business. Would Consultancy or insurance do this?

    How difficult is it, do you know, to enter consultancy with an ACA? Not that I'd specifically study ACA just for that sole reason of entering consultancy.
    Many people leave the big 4 once qualified for a position in Industry. I wouldn't go as far as saying it was easy, but by the sounds of it you get approached by a lot of employers.

    I don't know much about consultancy, but I certainly think an ACA is an advantage in many aspects of business. Just look at how many CEO's of FTSE 100 businesses have an ACA.
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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    Is it tough to 'move into industry then'. Also, what other things can you do with an ACA, I've heard it's respected across business, but could you give me a few career examples? Possibly involving travel abroad for business. Would Consultancy or insurance do this?

    How difficult is it, do you know, to enter consultancy with an ACA? Not that I'd specifically study ACA just for that sole reason of entering consultancy.
    KPMG let you do Advisory(Consultancy) and do an ACA at the same time. Might be worth looking into / asking them in their special sub forum.
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    (Original post by M1011)
    Many people leave the big 4 once qualified for a position in Industry. I wouldn't go as far as saying it was easy, but by the sounds of it you get approached by a lot of employers.

    I don't know much about consultancy, but I certainly think an ACA is an advantage in many aspects of business. Just look at how many CEO's of FTSE 100 businesses have an ACA.
    Ah okay, so non-big4 NQs also leave for industry? I think someone posted a stat which said only 10-20% go into industry? That sort of frightens me, I wouldn't mind doing financials etc. but I don't think I'd want to do it in practise, it seems like it gets repetitive, whereas joining a company gives you more scope to branch out into other financial things.
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    (Original post by Mirey)
    KPMG let you do Advisory(Consultancy) and do an ACA at the same time. Might be worth looking into / asking them in their special sub forum.
    I don't meet B grade GCSE requirements, only one I meet is PwC, that's why I was wondering how important was the big 4 'brand', surely the ACA in itself is highly regarded, it doesn't look 'easy'
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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    Ah okay, so non-big4 NQs also leave for industry? I think someone posted a stat which said only 10-20% go into industry? That sort of frightens me, I wouldn't mind doing financials etc. but I don't think I'd want to do it in practise, it seems like it gets repetitive, whereas joining a company gives you more scope to branch out into other financial things.
    I would presume so, but perhaps it is a bit more difficult to find a position. However it is all down to the individual candidate at the end of the day.

    My intention is most likely to go in to industry once qualified, so I've chosen to go down the corporate audit route as it quite clearly links to industry. So it isn't just about the qualification, it's also about the experience, and I think that is where the Big 4 really trump some of the smaller firms (although of course the likes of Grant Thornton are highly respectable as well).

    That said, I don't even start until September so everything I've said so far is just what I've heard really, so perhaps get confirmation before basing any career decisions on my advise
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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    I don't meet B grade GCSE requirements, only one I meet is PwC, that's why I was wondering how important was the big 4 'brand', surely the ACA in itself is highly regarded, it doesn't look 'easy'
    Just get a position at PWC and problem solved

    The thing about the ACA is it involved getting a required amount of experience working within a firm (it's like 450 days of statutory experience or something along those lines?). Therefore where you get your ACA from makes a difference. It's kind of like getting a degree, the same degree from a different institution can be worth a different amount in the eyes of employers.

    That said, just like a degree, if you get an ACA at a less prestigious firm that doesn't stop it from being very valuable. So if you don't end up in big 4 that doesn't mean you shouldn't go for it, there are plenty of other reputable firms.

    Another option may be to redo that GCSE.
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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    Ah okay, so non-big4 NQs also leave for industry? I think someone posted a stat which said only 10-20% go into industry? That sort of frightens me, I wouldn't mind doing financials etc. but I don't think I'd want to do it in practise, it seems like it gets repetitive, whereas joining a company gives you more scope to branch out into other financial things.
    Not sure where you got those stats from but somewhere like 60-75% of ACA trainees leave PwC after 5 years. They have to be going somewhere and my guess if that most are moving into industry or high finance roles. That's probably why in my partner interview I was asked 'what's you'r 5 year plan?', rather than a question about my longer term ambitions.
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    (Original post by M1011)
    Just get a position at PWC and problem solved

    The thing about the ACA is it involved getting a required amount of experience working within a firm (it's like 450 days of statutory experience or something along those lines?). Therefore where you get your ACA from makes a difference. It's kind of like getting a degree, the same degree from a different institution can be worth a different amount in the eyes of employers.

    That said, just like a degree, if you get an ACA at a less prestigious firm that doesn't stop it from being very valuable. So if you don't end up in big 4 that doesn't mean you shouldn't go for it, there are plenty of other reputable firms.

    Another option may be to redo that GCSE.
    Well, fingers crossed, but I'm not banking on anything, as you can't. I'm gonna be up against top applicants, but I'll try.

    Not worth retakes, they don't accept them. Not without very good reason

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