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How to tell my family I don't believe in God

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    Having given life and the world around me a considerable amount of thought in the summer holidays, I have come to the conclusion that I no longer believe in God. I have been brought up a Catholic however I went to a CofE primary school and my mum is Hindu, so I'm sure my family won't be angry. I just don't really know how to break it to my dad in particular. Thanks for any advice
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    go learn more before making silly conclusions like that
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    Ex-Muslim checking in. What is the possibility of your dad disowning you? If you think he will, are you financially dependant on him?
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    How old are you? If you are late-teens, perhaps try and shoehorn it into a conversation about them allowing you greater levels of responsibility and independence as you get older. If you are younger, then perhaps dress it up as a more temporary thing by saying that you think you should be able to include religious investigation in your wider education (If you're 20s and older then just be fairly insistent on intellectual independence, I'd say). Try and make it look assured rather than like a weakness ("I'm considering some new ideas" rather than "I think I'm losing my faith"). Good luck.
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    It sounds like it shouldn't be too much of an issue. Pick a time when both of your parents are together, possibly a meal time, and tell them you've been doing a lot of thinking and you don't think you believe in a God any more. If your father does overreact, your mother will be there to act as a calming influence.
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    My family is of mixed faith, Hindu/Buddhist/Sikh/Christian. My Grandfather is Indian and he allows us to be any religion we wish (more or less). I am Atheist, I went to a CofE Primary, and a Christian Secondary School.

    Your family should respect your decision, and if they don't then that's just cruel.
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    (Original post by Noor90)
    Ex-Muslim checking in. What is the possibility of your dad disowning you? If you think he will, are you financially dependant on him?
    Nobody in my family will disown me, I'm pretty sure of that
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    (Original post by Plainview)
    How old are you? If you are late-teens, perhaps try and shoehorn it into a conversation about them allowing you greater levels of responsibility and independence as you get older. If you are younger, then perhaps dress it up as a more temporary thing by saying that you think you should be able to include religious investigation in your wider education (If you're 20s and older then just be fairly insistent on intellectual independence, I'd say). Try and make it look assured rather than like a weakness ("I'm considering some new ideas" rather than "I think I'm losing my faith"). Good luck.
    I'm 15. Thank you, your advice is great, I'd never been able to see a way of saying it in a non-negative way before
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    (Original post by the-black-lotus)
    Nobody in my family will disown me, I'm pretty sure of that
    I see, but why the need to tell them in the first place? If they wouldn't disown you, sounds like they'd be pretty cool with you doing whatever you wanted anyways. Unless of course your dad makes you do certain religious things you no longer wish to carry out, but if not, what is the reason?
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    (Original post by tory88)
    It sounds like it shouldn't be too much of an issue. Pick a time when both of your parents are together, possibly a meal time, and tell them you've been doing a lot of thinking and you don't think you believe in a God any more. If your father does overreact, your mother will be there to act as a calming influence.
    Thanks for the advice, I need to pick a time now...
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    (Original post by Kelytha)
    My family is of mixed faith, Hindu/Buddhist/Sikh/Christian. My Grandfather is Indian and he allows us to be any religion we wish (more or less). I am Atheist, I went to a CofE Primary, and a Christian Secondary School.

    Your family should respect your decision, and if they don't then that's just cruel.
    I hope my whole family will be supportive like I take it yours have been
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    (Original post by Noor90)
    I see, but why the need to tell them in the first place? If they wouldn't disown you, sounds like they'd be pretty cool with you doing whatever you wanted anyways. Unless of course your dad makes you do certain religious things you no longer wish to carry out, but if not, what is the reason?
    It's because at present I go to church every Sunday and I suppose saying the apostle's creed every week when I don't believe a word of it makes me feel slightly uncomfortable
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    (Original post by the-black-lotus)
    It's because at present I go to church every Sunday and I suppose saying the apostle's creed every week when I don't believe a word of it makes me feel slightly uncomfortable
    I still have to wear a hijab, pray 5 times a day, go to Mosque every Fridays (but it's usually more than that), read the Qur'an etc... no one in my family knows of my apostasy. Maybe it's just me, but if all you have to do is go to Church once a week and recite a few lines, it isn't really that big of a deal. Once you're out of there, you can do whatever you want and they can't stop you. If you really wanna stop then I think some of the above posters have given good advice, but really I don't see much of a point.
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    (Original post by Noor90)
    I still have to wear a hijab, pray 5 times a day, go to Mosque every Fridays (but it's usually more than that), read the Qur'an etc... no one in my family knows of my apostasy. Maybe it's just me, but if all you have to do is go to Church once a week and recite a few lines, it isn't really that big of a deal. Once you're out of there, you can do whatever you want and they can't stop you. If you really wanna stop then I think some of the above posters have given good advice, but really I don't see much of a point.
    hmm interesting..

    what made u out of the religion feel free to pm me im interested.
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    (Original post by Shadow-X)
    hmm interesting..

    what made u out of the religion feel free to pm me im interested.
    No thanks Jeff.
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    (Original post by Noor90)
    I still have to wear a hijab, pray 5 times a day, go to Mosque every Fridays (but it's usually more than that), read the Qur'an etc... no one in my family knows of my apostasy. Maybe it's just me, but if all you have to do is go to Church once a week and recite a few lines, it isn't really that big of a deal. Once you're out of there, you can do whatever you want and they can't stop you. If you really wanna stop then I think some of the above posters have given good advice, but really I don't see much of a point.
    I understand your point. However, if OP feels like its something they want to get out in the open and doing so won't affect their well being at all, then doing it is fine. I think more people should be wary about telling their parents about their change in belief since they don't tend to notice just how much it could affect their parents but OP looks like she's in a decent situation.

    If she still feels too nervous about telling her dad, then she should ask to go to church less or not at all. Then slowly separate herself from the whole religion thing.
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    (Original post by Noor90)
    No thanks Jeff.
    my name aint jeff
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    (Original post by Noor90)
    I still have to wear a hijab, pray 5 times a day, go to Mosque every Fridays (but it's usually more than that), read the Qur'an etc... no one in my family knows of my apostasy. Maybe it's just me, but if all you have to do is go to Church once a week and recite a few lines, it isn't really that big of a deal. Once you're out of there, you can do whatever you want and they can't stop you. If you really wanna stop then I think some of the above posters have given good advice, but really I don't see much of a point.
    Your post was really interesting and yes I do think that the most important thing is just that I know what I do/don't believe in but I think that for me being open with my family will probably be okay and make me feel a bit better about myself
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    Come in wearing a Richard Dawkins T-shirt.
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    (Original post by chickenonsteroids)
    I understand your point. However, if OP feels like its something they want to get out in the open and doing so won't affect their well being at all, then doing it is fine. I think more people should be wary about telling their parents about their change in belief since they don't tend to notice just how much it could affect their parents but OP looks like she's in a decent situation.

    If she still feels too nervous about telling her dad, then she should ask to go to church less or not at all. Then slowly separate herself from the whole religion thing.
    I do want to be as open as possible with my family in general, I think asking to go to church less would be a bit pointless for me, not that I'd object to going just that it just wouldn't make much sense to anyone. I'm hoping my dad won't be that surprised

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