Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Choosing unis to apply to (& Nottingham questions)

Announcements Posted on
    • Thread Starter
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I'm year 12 so, 2013 applicant. With those lucky enough to have offers deciding where to go thought this would be a good time to ask such questions.

    Bristol is my first choice just trying not to let myself set my heart on it! I don't think Cambridge is for me so that's out, same with Scotland, leaving RVC liv and notts.

    If anyone could answer any of my questions that'd be great! I'm really interested in farm side of things btw.

    RVC - how much practical is there with being in London? Has the cost of living in London affected you? And what are the farm facilities like, I know some places have own dairies etc can't remember my RVC research.

    Liv - what is the course structure there? I hear they're good for horses but again what farm facilities are there?

    Notts - this is the one I'm really questioning. Apart from the dairy/farm what are the facilities, I gather there's less work in onsite vet school practices and more in local practices - what do you think of this? Also how have people felt about the integrated course structure, not sure if this is for me?

    Lots of questions
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    RVC:

    In London there are 2 cows, 2 ponies and 2 greyhounds, which are used to teach anatomy - in addition to dissections etc, so you get to practice palpating/finding landmarks on animals. You also go out to HH a few times to have animal handling practicals (equine, cows, sheep, pigs) before you do placements - so that you know what you should be doing! You will also go out to HH for a couple of large animal (sheep and pony) dissections/post mortems. College provide transport for the times when you are timetabled to go out there. So it really isn't a problem being in London - you still get plenty of hands on experience as and when you need it.

    Farm facilities wise - we have a university farm (Boltons Park), which has a small dairy, a flock of sheep, a few pigs/chickens, raise turkeys for Christmas etc. You don't spend much/any time actually in the dairy - but that's because you do dairy placements. You do go to the farm for practicals though - cow rectals, body condition scoring, etc. The farm is a short walk away from the main HH campus, but we also have barns on site, so depending what the practical is, we often just have animals in the barns that we use (so for things like auscultation practicals).

    Cost of London: I think the main thing I noticed in london was the price of accom. You will get a higher loan because you are in london, but it is a loan, so you have to pay it back. But you are only in london for two years, living out near HH is a lot cheaper in your 3rd year onwards. It also depends on other things - some of the unis you might have cheaper accom, but not live near the uni, so have to pay transport costs. Most students live within walking distance of camden, and at HH either within walking distance or on the free shuttle bus route - so no transport costs to consider. Also, from my point of view - it was def a good experience living having lived in london, and that is from someone who isn't even a 'city person!' I liked living in london and having all that offers to explore on my doorstep - popping down to covent garden or the embankment for an afternoon, natural history museum etc.

    Errr...think that answers your RVC q's. If you have anymore, just ask!
    • Thread Starter
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kookabura)
    RVC:

    In London there are 2 cows, 2 ponies and 2 greyhounds, which are used to teach anatomy - in addition to dissections etc, so you get to practice palpating/finding landmarks on animals. You also go out to HH a few times to have animal handling practicals (equine, cows, sheep, pigs) before you do placements - so that you know what you should be doing! You will also go out to HH for a couple of large animal (sheep and pony) dissections/post mortems. College provide transport for the times when you are timetabled to go out there. So it really isn't a problem being in London - you still get plenty of hands on experience as and when you need it.

    Farm facilities wise - we have a university farm (Boltons Park), which has a small dairy, a flock of sheep, a few pigs/chickens, raise turkeys for Christmas etc. You don't spend much/any time actually in the dairy - but that's because you do dairy placements. You do go to the farm for practicals though - cow rectals, body condition scoring, etc. The farm is a short walk away from the main HH campus, but we also have barns on site, so depending what the practical is, we often just have animals in the barns that we use (so for things like auscultation practicals).

    Cost of London: I think the main thing I noticed in london was the price of accom. You will get a higher loan because you are in london, but it is a loan, so you have to pay it back. But you are only in london for two years, living out near HH is a lot cheaper in your 3rd year onwards. It also depends on other things - some of the unis you might have cheaper accom, but not live near the uni, so have to pay transport costs. Most students live within walking distance of camden, and at HH either within walking distance or on the free shuttle bus route - so no transport costs to consider. Also, from my point of view - it was def a good experience living having lived in london, and that is from someone who isn't even a 'city person!' I liked living in london and having all that offers to explore on my doorstep - popping down to covent garden or the embankment for an afternoon, natural history museum etc.

    Errr...think that answers your RVC q's. If you have anymore, just ask!
    Thank you! Very helpful how often do you go to hawkshead?
    • 11 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Leigh303)
    I'm year 12 so, 2013 applicant. With those lucky enough to have offers deciding where to go thought this would be a good time to ask such questions.

    Bristol is my first choice just trying not to let myself set my heart on it! I don't think Cambridge is for me so that's out, same with Scotland, leaving RVC liv and notts.

    If anyone could answer any of my questions that'd be great! I'm really interested in farm side of things btw.

    RVC - how much practical is there with being in London? Has the cost of living in London affected you? And what are the farm facilities like, I know some places have own dairies etc can't remember my RVC research.

    Liv - what is the course structure there? I hear they're good for horses but again what farm facilities are there?

    Notts - this is the one I'm really questioning. Apart from the dairy/farm what are the facilities, I gather there's less work in onsite vet school practices and more in local practices - what do you think of this? Also how have people felt about the integrated course structure, not sure if this is for me?

    Lots of questions
    Hi

    I have 3 offers from RVC, Bristol and Nottingham.

    Bristol- is a very nice University and absolutely massive investment has taken place in the Vet school and it's reputation is recovering after it had lost a bit of it after a time of low investment. I was very impressed by the new Langford buildings. It's course is weighted quite academically compared to practical. (It is my reserve choice )

    RVC- is recognized by the American Veterinary Medical Association and is a very good place to go aswell as a host of other associations http://www.rvc.ac.uk/Undergraduate/Index.cfm
    My main problem with RVC is that the first it is smack bang in the middle of Camden for the first couple years, with only a couple of animals to see as Kookabura has already said (and knows a lot more about the course than I do!!) It just didn't feel right for me when I went around the Camden campus on interview Accommodation was jaw droppingly expensive and having a cousin go to UCL they told me that living costs are fairly savage as well. The Hawshead campus is very nice however (I say very I mean mega! )

    I honestly can't tell you much about Liverpool as I got a straight rejection from them. I liked the city and liked the campus at Leahurst but there are people on TSR who know a lot more about it than me!

    With regards to Nottingham. Quite simply I was blown away at interview by it, it's a brand new campus with buildings popping up everywhere, the facilites are incredible, there really is nothing less (there might be even more than) other universities with regards to farms etc, there's a pig unit, a dairy herd, a poultry farm (the list does go on ) There's a brand new gym complex and there's even a micro-brewery on site!!! (brewing scientist and bio-scientists are also on the Sutton Bonnington campus.) It is the only single campus vet school (in England I can't comment at all on the Scottish vet schools), meaning that for all 5 years, you will be in the same place, it gives Nottingham a very friendly atmosphere.

    There isn't a University second opinion practice at Nottingham as for EMS they want their students to see the cases that they are likely to come across in practice, rather than seeing the very rare cases that come through a second opinion practice such as what is found at normal university.

    The course is integrated and from day one you will deal with animals (and at interview for that matter, I'm not allowed to tell you what happened at mine, but animals were involved to a degree ) Having an integrated practical course means that you learn the theory and then see that theory in practice at the same time. It is to ensure that you can apply your knowledge to real life cases, it's more difficult than you's think!! It is ground braking and is just :coma: (so good)

    To be perfectly honest whatever vet school you apply to, you will be a very good vet and will have very good employment opportunities

    Any questions regarding anything I've said don't hesitate to ask
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Leigh303)
    Thank you! Very helpful how often do you go to hawkshead?
    When do you mean? In first/second years, when you are in Camden? Third/fourth/fifth years are based at Hawkshead, so are there all the time. First and second years go out, like I said in my other post, for animal handling and dissections, so maybe half a dozen times or so. Not that much admittedly, but it makes it all the nicer when you are actually out here in third year! It also depends what else you do, some sports clubs are based out here, so some people come out every wednesday. I wasn't in a club based out here, but still came out to HH a few times to visit friends in older years/come to the SU bar in HH for events etc.

    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    RVC- is recognized by the American Veterinary Medical Association and is a very good place to go aswell as a host of other associations http://www.rvc.ac.uk/Undergraduate/Index.cfm
    My main problem with RVC is that the first it is smack bang in the middle of Camden for the first couple years, with only a couple of animals to see as Kookabura has already said (and knows a lot more about the course than I do!!) It just didn't feel right for me when I went around the Camden campus on interview Accommodation was jaw droppingly expensive and having a cousin go to UCL they told me that living costs are fairly savage as well. The Hawshead campus is very nice however (I say very I mean mega! )

    To be perfectly honest whatever vet school you apply to, you will be a very good vet and will have very good employment opportunities
    RVC is also EAEVE accredited. We are the only vet school worldwide to have AVMA, EAEVE and RCVS approval - meaning literally the world is your oyster. You could work anywhere in Europe, America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand etc...

    Yes, we only have a few animals in Camden - but you really don't need any more at that stage. You get animal handling classes at HH, and then you animal husbandry placements as well - which really are the best place for getting lots of hands on experience.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    Hi It just didn't feel right for me when I went around the Camden campus on interview Accommodation was jaw droppingly expensive and having a cousin go to UCL they told me that living costs are fairly savage as well. The Hawshead campus is very nice however (I say very I mean mega! )
    just to contradict angry cucumber... i absolutely loved the camden campus! it seemed to me to be a great place to study for the preclinical years and you should definitely go and have a look around if you get the chance before making up your mind. i think they do tours at some point but you also get to see it at interview if you don't get to go beforehand.

    i think that as far as the course structure goes (kookabura can correct me if i've got this wrong as i haven't actually studied there yet!) i liked the way that they explained it at the interview, that its sort of a spiral so that you look at a topic once and then come back to it again in a different way as you build up your knowledge and skills over the years. ok so they explained it a lot better than i did... i also like the fact that the RVC has been doing this for a very long time so i feel in safe hands! (and that wasn't a dig at nottingham for being new because i really liked nottingham too)

    as far as accommodation expenses are concerned, student halls are very expensive but the i think the increased maintenance loan for london is actually a fair increase relative to the increased costs. a maintenance loan doesn't cover all your costs anywhere you go - my accommodation in student halls cost nearly twice my maintenance loan when i was at university (outside of london)!
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by schizopear)
    i think that as far as the course structure goes (kookabura can correct me if i've got this wrong as i haven't actually studied there yet!) i liked the way that they explained it at the interview, that its sort of a spiral so that you look at a topic once and then come back to it again in a different way as you build up your knowledge and skills over the years.
    Yep, you've got it :-)

    We are taught in body system stands - so alimentary, cardiovascular, respiratory, locomotion etc. All those strands are visited three times in your time here - once, relatively quickly in first year, so you have a general overview of everything, are aware of how things fit together and to try and get everybody to a similar levels (people from a levels, IB, people with and without gap year/s etc). So for some people some of this is repetition more than other people - but it is a good starting point. Then you will cover all the strands again in your 1st or 2nd year in more detail. You will cover the relevant gross anatomy, histology and physiology at the same time (lectures, dissections, histo practicals, directed learning sessions and computer aided learning's). It is basically all pre-clinical, so the normal structure/function, but the directed learnings often have a bit more of a clinical scenario to them. You do have the odd other random module thrown in, such as parasitology, which is easier taught as a module like that, rather than making it fit into a system.

    Then in clinical years (3/4) you will visit all the systems again, but this time clinically - so reproduction module - and all the potential problems, surgery (castrates, spays, c/sections etc). Running parallel with this there is a principles of science strand which covers general things like surgical techniques, suturing, anaesthesia and so on.

    Whilst I've had no experience of being taught in another style (like some of the uni's teach anatomy, histology, pharmacology etc all as separate things), personally I like the way we are taught. When you encounter patients you generally think in body systems - what is affected and why - you need to be able to think of the anatomy, physiology and so on of one system - not all anatomy at once. It also means that things that are a bit boring (like histology!) doesn't bore you to death in a one long module, you have it interspersed throughout more interesting things!

    I know some uni's start teaching the clinical side of things earlier - which may seem like a good thing now - and it may well be interesting. But again, personally I think I'd rather have a good grounding in the basics first and then build on it. I'm fairly (ish) confident with anatomy and so on, so now considering surgery aspects and so on, I feel I can concentrate on that part of it, rather than still trying to work the anatomy out.

    Hope that all makes sense!!
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kookabura)
    When do you mean? In first/second years, when you are in Camden? Third/fourth/fifth years are based at Hawkshead, so are there all the time. First and second years go out, like I said in my other post, for animal handling and dissections, so maybe half a dozen times or so. Not that much admittedly, but it makes it all the nicer when you are actually out here in third year! It also depends what else you do, some sports clubs are based out here, so some people come out every wednesday. I wasn't in a club based out here, but still came out to HH a few times to visit friends in older years/come to the SU bar in HH for events etc.



    RVC is also EAEVE accredited. We are the only vet school worldwide to have AVMA, EAEVE and RCVS approval - meaning literally the world is your oyster. You could work anywhere in Europe, America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand etc...

    Yes, we only have a few animals in Camden - but you really don't need any more at that stage. You get animal handling classes at HH, and then you animal husbandry placements as well - which really are the best place for getting lots of hands on experience.
    Edinburgh Is also accredited by RCVS, AVMA and EAEVE!
    http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departme.../accreditation
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ogrice80)
    Edinburgh Is also accredited by RCVS, AVMA and EAEVE!
    http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departme.../accreditation
    Not totally correct. Edinburgh is EAEVE approved - not accredited. http://www.eaeve.org/fileadmin/downl...0405latest.pdf (There are only actually 4 vet schools in europe with full accreditation. Yes, approval is still good, but full accreditation is better :-)

    I was initially just going with what RVC said on our website:

    The RVC is the first veterinary school in the UK, and the only one world-wide, to achieve full accreditation by EAEVE and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and full recognition by the UK's Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons.

    Accreditation by EAEVE provides Europe-wide assurance of the RVC's academic standards and the quality of its veterinary medicine degree programme. Only three other European veterinary schools - Copenhagen, Helsinki and Zurich/Bern - have achieved this status.
    But I had a look on the EAEVE website, and that is the link that I posted above.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kookabura)
    Not totally correct. Edinburgh is EAEVE approved - not accredited. http://www.eaeve.org/fileadmin/downl...0405latest.pdf (There are only actually 4 vet schools in europe with full accreditation. Yes, approval is still good, but full accreditation is better :-)

    I was initially just going with what RVC said on our website:



    But I had a look on the EAEVE website, and that is the link that I posted above.
    Ah okay! Sorry, thank you
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Leigh303)
    Liv - what is the course structure there? I hear they're good for horses but again what farm facilities are there?
    We currently have a traditional structure. Years 1-3 preclinical (biochemistry, anatomy, physiology, behaviour, farming/equine industries, body systems). We have a mixture of lectures, dissections, histology (microscope work) and animal handling classes, right from the 1st year. You learn the basics needed to understand disease and treatments. Years 4-5 are based outside of Liverpool, on the Wirral were all our hospitals are based, and are clinical years (focusing on treatment of disease).

    We have a working dairy, sheep, pig and beef (though we have not had much to do with the beef side of things). We have an equine, s/a and farm hospital.We also have first opinion practices too. All of these are used in clinical teaching. More info can be found on the Liv website.

    At Liverpool, although you may have heard of its reputation for horses, all our other hospitals are top quality & modern too, and you learn about all aspects of being a vet, so there should not be any bias in any way towards equine medicine.
    • 0 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    Hi

    I have 3 offers from RVC, Bristol and Nottingham.

    Bristol- is a very nice University and absolutely massive investment has taken place in the Vet school and it's reputation is recovering after it had lost a bit of it after a time of low investment. I was very impressed by the new Langford buildings. It's course is weighted quite academically compared to practical. (It is my reserve choice )

    RVC- is recognized by the American Veterinary Medical Association and is a very good place to go aswell as a host of other associations http://www.rvc.ac.uk/Undergraduate/Index.cfm
    My main problem with RVC is that the first it is smack bang in the middle of Camden for the first couple years, with only a couple of animals to see as Kookabura has already said (and knows a lot more about the course than I do!!) It just didn't feel right for me when I went around the Camden campus on interview Accommodation was jaw droppingly expensive and having a cousin go to UCL they told me that living costs are fairly savage as well. The Hawshead campus is very nice however (I say very I mean mega! )

    I honestly can't tell you much about Liverpool as I got a straight rejection from them. I liked the city and liked the campus at Leahurst but there are people on TSR who know a lot more about it than me!

    With regards to Nottingham. Quite simply I was blown away at interview by it, it's a brand new campus with buildings popping up everywhere, the facilites are incredible, there really is nothing less (there might be even more than) other universities with regards to farms etc, there's a pig unit, a dairy herd, a poultry farm (the list does go on ) There's a brand new gym complex and there's even a micro-brewery on site!!! (brewing scientist and bio-scientists are also on the Sutton Bonnington campus.) It is the only single campus vet school (in England I can't comment at all on the Scottish vet schools), meaning that for all 5 years, you will be in the same place, it gives Nottingham a very friendly atmosphere.

    There isn't a University second opinion practice at Nottingham as for EMS they want their students to see the cases that they are likely to come across in practice, rather than seeing the very rare cases that come through a second opinion practice such as what is found at normal university.

    The course is integrated and from day one you will deal with animals (and at interview for that matter, I'm not allowed to tell you what happened at mine, but animals were involved to a degree ) Having an integrated practical course means that you learn the theory and then see that theory in practice at the same time. It is to ensure that you can apply your knowledge to real life cases, it's more difficult than you's think!! It is ground braking and is just :coma: (so good)

    To be perfectly honest whatever vet school you apply to, you will be a very good vet and will have very good employment opportunities

    Any questions regarding anything I've said don't hesitate to ask
    i know it's all a bit hush hush but can you give me any tips for getting into nottingham? didn't want to get my heart set on anything but it is amazing there!
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    This is so useful
    Thank you all you knowledgable people who've posted!
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    Hi

    I have 3 offers from RVC, Bristol and Nottingham.

    Bristol- is a very nice University and absolutely massive investment has taken place in the Vet school and it's reputation is recovering after it had lost a bit of it after a time of low investment. I was very impressed by the new Langford buildings. It's course is weighted quite academically compared to practical. (It is my reserve choice )

    RVC- is recognized by the American Veterinary Medical Association and is a very good place to go aswell as a host of other associations http://www.rvc.ac.uk/Undergraduate/Index.cfm
    My main problem with RVC is that the first it is smack bang in the middle of Camden for the first couple years, with only a couple of animals to see as Kookabura has already said (and knows a lot more about the course than I do!!) It just didn't feel right for me when I went around the Camden campus on interview Accommodation was jaw droppingly expensive and having a cousin go to UCL they told me that living costs are fairly savage as well. The Hawshead campus is very nice however (I say very I mean mega! )

    I honestly can't tell you much about Liverpool as I got a straight rejection from them. I liked the city and liked the campus at Leahurst but there are people on TSR who know a lot more about it than me!

    With regards to Nottingham. Quite simply I was blown away at interview by it, it's a brand new campus with buildings popping up everywhere, the facilites are incredible, there really is nothing less (there might be even more than) other universities with regards to farms etc, there's a pig unit, a dairy herd, a poultry farm (the list does go on ) There's a brand new gym complex and there's even a micro-brewery on site!!! (brewing scientist and bio-scientists are also on the Sutton Bonnington campus.) It is the only single campus vet school (in England I can't comment at all on the Scottish vet schools), meaning that for all 5 years, you will be in the same place, it gives Nottingham a very friendly atmosphere.

    There isn't a University second opinion practice at Nottingham as for EMS they want their students to see the cases that they are likely to come across in practice, rather than seeing the very rare cases that come through a second opinion practice such as what is found at normal university.

    The course is integrated and from day one you will deal with animals (and at interview for that matter, I'm not allowed to tell you what happened at mine, but animals were involved to a degree ) Having an integrated practical course means that you learn the theory and then see that theory in practice at the same time. It is to ensure that you can apply your knowledge to real life cases, it's more difficult than you's think!! It is ground braking and is just :coma: (so good)

    To be perfectly honest whatever vet school you apply to, you will be a very good vet and will have very good employment opportunities

    Any questions regarding anything I've said don't hesitate to ask
    Out of curiousity...How much work experience did you have before applying?
    • 11 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Swettybetty)
    Out of curiousity...How much work experience did you have before applying?
    On the Liverpool form it totaled up to 20 weeks

    However, quality > quantity, every time.

    For the questionnaires (Nottingham) and Personal statement, it's about showing what you've learnt from your work experience that you should convey and not just "I went here" "I also went here" etc.

    And remember it's not just about the w/e you've got to show you have a life as well, so use examples of sport, leadership, mentoring etc, to show that your a rounded applicant and not a "gradebot"

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?

    this is what you'll be called on TSR

  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?

    never shared and never spammed

  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide the button to the right to create your account

    Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: April 23, 2012
New on TSR

Naughtiest thing you did at school

Did you get away with it or were you punished?

Article updates
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.