Just one sec...
Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free to post

Chances of getting into LSE for Law.

Announcements Posted on
Take our short survey, £100 of Amazon vouchers to be won! 23-09-2016
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I was wondering what my chances of getting into LSE for Law are with gcse's : 1 A*, 5 's, 2 B's and 1 C. AS levels AAAB and predicted A-Level grades of AAAA in French, Spanish, English Literature and Business Studies. I know my gcses aren't the best and have heard they are very specific with what GCSE grades are required but do you think i have a chance??
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    You'll be fine, you're GCSEs are great, enough to get into LSE I reckon.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Ah sorry i meant 5 a's at gcse **. That's fine i hope so, thanks :-)
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Alexvs)
    Ah sorry i meant 5 a's at gcse **. That's fine i hope so, thanks :-)
    You ll be fine, however this thread hasn't be placed in the correct forum section.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Spairos)
    You ll be fine, however this thread hasn't be placed in the correct forum section.
    Yeha i noticed sorry, i made this like an hour ago so i'm not sure how to use it! Posted in correct forum now, thanks :-)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I think previous posters have been a bit too optimistic o.O LSE are notorious GCSE nazis. Especially because they don't use the LNAT. Personally, I think your GCSEs are quite a way below what LSE will expect, and you only did 9 so I expect they would want even more A*s. Also, you don't have the A* prediction that they require.

    My feeling is that you wouldn't get past the screening process.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sean9001)
    I think previous posters have been a bit too optimistic o.O LSE are notorious GCSE nazis. Especially because they don't use the LNAT. Personally, I think your GCSEs are quite a way below what LSE will expect, and you only did 9 so I expect they would want even more A*s. Also, you don't have the A* prediction that they require.

    My feeling is that you wouldn't get past the screening process.
    this is so true. they've also raised their entry standards to compete with UCL, King's and the likes, and bear in mind that these are 'minimum' requirements. you're competing with top-notch students from all around the world, and it might take you a breathtaking personal statement to land you an offer tbh! in any case though, good luck
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Alexvs)
    I was wondering what my chances of getting into LSE for Law are with gcse's : 1 A*, 5 's, 2 B's and 1 C. AS levels AAAB and predicted A-Level grades of AAAA in French, Spanish, English Literature and Business Studies. I know my gcses aren't the best and have heard they are very specific with what GCSE grades are required but do you think i have a chance??
    no chance. gcse grades a bad compared to standard lse law applicant. most applicants will have most of their gcse grades at A* and the rest As (including 3 sciences and maths - not soft subjects) at AS level they would would have more than 4 AS levels at A grade. btw business studies is seen as a soft subject.

    A friend of mine got rejected with straight As / A*s at gcse and 6 As at AS and predicted A* for all his A level grades.

    your grades arent bad compared to the general population, but lse will be a wasted option.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Alexvs)
    I was wondering what my chances of getting into LSE for Law are with gcse's : 1 A*, 5 's, 2 B's and 1 C. AS levels AAAB and predicted A-Level grades of AAAA in French, Spanish, English Literature and Business Studies. I know my gcses aren't the best and have heard they are very specific with what GCSE grades are required but do you think i have a chance??
    You will need an excellent personal statement, check their site out .
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    not to mention that all the applicants with straight A*s at gcse and As at AS along with A* predictions will also have excellent personal statements and work experience. so even if you have an excellent personal statement you will still be a bad applicant
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by overninethousand)
    not to mention that all the applicants with straight As and A* predictions will also have excellent personal statements and work experience. so even if you have an excellent personal statement you will still be a bad applicant
    How can you be so sure that everyone with straight A/A* predictions will have excellent personal statements which are deemed excellent by the notoriously hard to please admissions tutors at the LSE?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    LSE do place a considerable amount of emphasis on GCSEs, so your chances are less than others. However, in the application cycle next year, someone with similar or worse GCSEs will get a conditional offer from LSE, there is no reason why that person can't be you. If your other choices are sensible, go for it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AK0001)
    How can you be so sure that everyone with straight A/A* predictions will have excellent personal statements which are deemed excellent by the notoriously hard to please admissions tutors at the LSE?
    considering they have As and A*s, in most likely essay based subjects as they are applying for law, im making (a pretty reasonable) assumption that they can write quite well and are at least semi-intelligent, though probably quite intelligent and hard working. i dont see a reason why a person who writes well enough to get As and A* in high stress, time limited exams would not write well on their personal statement for which they have much more time to prepare and which is much less stressful.
    can you justify the assumption that they wont have excellent personal statements? one or two may not but the vast majority will. and even some of these will not get offers.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by overninethousand)
    considering they have As and A*s, in most likely essay based subjects as they are applying for law, im making (a pretty reasonable) assumption that they can write quite well and are at least semi-intelligent, though probably quite intelligent and hard working. i dont see a reason why a person who writes well enough to get As and A* in high stress, time limited exams would not write well on their personal statement for which they have much more time to prepare and which is much less stressful.
    can you justify the assumption that they wont have excellent personal statements? one or two may not but the vast majority will. and even some of these will not get offers.
    Writing a good personal statement and writing a personal statement which appeals to LSE are two fundamentally different things. Pretty much, most applicants, to the top 10 law schools will have 'good' personal statements, however it may not be to LSE's taste. Not everyone can write a excellent personal statement which accurately conveys their desire to study Law. I know countless people who have applied to LSE with top grades, who were rejected on the basis of a 'average/poor' statement. LSE and also Warwick are two universities, who do place a considerable amount of weight on the personal statement.for Law in particular.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by overninethousand)
    considering they have As and A*s, in most likely essay based subjects as they are applying for law, im making (a pretty reasonable) assumption that they can write quite well and are at least semi-intelligent, though probably quite intelligent and hard working. i dont see a reason why a person who writes well enough to get As and A* in high stress, time limited exams would not write well on their personal statement for which they have much more time to prepare and which is much less stressful.
    can you justify the assumption that they wont have excellent personal statements? one or two may not but the vast majority will. and even some of these will not get offers.
    The post above is a sufficient reply.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tsunami2011)
    Writing a good personal statement and writing a personal statement which appeals to LSE are two fundamentally different things. Pretty much, most applicants, to the top 10 law schools will have 'good' personal statements, however it may not be to LSE's taste. Not everyone can write a excellent personal statement which accurately conveys their desire to study Law. I know countless people who have applied to LSE with top grades, who were rejected on the basis of a 'average/poor' statement. LSE and also Warwick are two universities, who do place a considerable amount of weight on the personal statement.for Law in particular.
    how are they two fundamentally different things? if it appeals to the admissions tutors its good, if it doesnt its bad. the candidates applying to lse will write them in such a way as to appeal to these admissions tutors. the only measure of how 'good' a personal statement is, is how good it is at getting you the offer you want (ie lse). you could write the best piece of literature ever but it would be a bad personal statement as it is not what the admissions people are looking for.

    the vast majority of applicants will be more than capable and aware of how to write a 'good' personal statement (ie one that gets them an lse offer). as almost all lse applicants will have 4+ As/A*s . this is a good indicator that their writing skills are good as you do not get good grades by being ill prepared and and writing badly.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    LOL!
    For all those saying LSE are GCSE witches, my friend got in with worse GCSE's than these.
    Apply! The chances are slim, but optimism will give you the opportunity you otherwise wouldn't have!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    you only did 9 gcses?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by overninethousand)
    how are they two fundamentally different things? if it appeals to the admissions tutors its good, if it doesnt its bad. the candidates applying to lse will write them in such a way as to appeal to these admissions tutors. the only measure of how 'good' a personal statement is, is how good it is at getting you the offer you want (ie lse). you could write the best piece of literature ever but it would be a bad personal statement as it is not what the admissions people are looking for.

    the vast majority of applicants will be more than capable and aware of how to write a 'good' personal statement (ie one that gets them an lse offer). as almost all lse applicants will have 4+ As/A*s . this is a good indicator that their writing skills are good as you do not get good grades by being ill prepared and and writing badly.
    You're missing my point. If someone follows a very basic outline for a Law PS, and avoids making any grammar/spelling errors, their personal statement will be a decent personal statement by default. However, if you're applying for LSE, you're expected to look at the course outline, the manner in which its taught, and ensure that you tailor your personal statement appriorately. I cannot stress how many people DO NOT do this. They write a generic personal statement and just apply for the top 10 universities. For example, if you're applying to Oxford or Cambridge, you can just chuck in one line about your extra curricular. However, for Durham, that would probably mean a rejection. This doesn't make your PS 'poor' it just means you're not suited to the university.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rachoo12)
    LOL!
    For all those saying LSE are GCSE witches, my friend got in with worse GCSE's than these.
    Apply! The chances are slim, but optimism will give you the opportunity you otherwise wouldn't have!
    LOL!

    If you think that your argument is convincing.

    edit: why the neg?

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. Oops, you need to agree to our Ts&Cs to register
  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: September 9, 2012
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Poll
Who will be the next permanent England boss?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22

Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.