Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there! Sign in to have your say on this topicNew here? Join for free to post

Do people who go to uni really enjoy studying?

Announcements Posted on
    • 7 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I'd say 50% of the time I dont enjoy it, 50% I do enjoy it. Which isn't a good thing. Its mainly because I have so many exams throughout the year so its continuous stress. Some of my modules are very difficult so I get frustrated and I lose interest that way. Having said that, I do enjoy some modules even if they are difficult and I begin to enjoy things more when I can understand how to do it. Thats the issue...I dont understand half the stuff my lecturers talk about (the algebraic half, I can understand theory). So its a love hate thing. Career prospects unfortunately drive my motivation now, I really would like to get a 2.1, maybe even a first.
    • 99 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    What I'd like to ask in this thread is a question directed at any people who are either currently in uni, have been in the past or plan to go in the future:

    Do you very much enjoy studying in general? Do you get a lot of joy and satisfaction in studying your chosen subject(s)? Do you never feel any dislike for it at all? Would you say you are very passionate about it? Or are you only doing it with some moderate interest and the main goal of improving career prospects and/or experiencing the student lifestyle?
    I do actually usually enjoying studying. I'm quite a geek like that. I get excited about little things and finding out more about a subject in a rigorous way. That's not to say I always enjoy it though. Like you, I suffer from depression and so it becomes very difficult to muster up enthusiasm when I'm in a bad way. Overall though, I'm definitely doing my Masters (and I did my undergrad) for the love of the subject :love:
    • 57 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    What I'd like to ask in this thread is a question directed at any people who are either currently in uni, have been in the past or plan to go in the future:

    Do you very much enjoy studying in general? Do you get a lot of joy and satisfaction in studying your chosen subject(s)? Do you never feel any dislike for it at all? Would you say you are very passionate about it? Or are you only doing it with some moderate interest and the main goal of improving career prospects and/or experiencing the student lifestyle?


    Or anyone feel anything like I do in the next paragraph?

    If anyone's interested, I've personally been having my reservations about uni lately, due to bad experiences with education in the past few years. I really can't find that one subject I'm very passionate about or particularly good at. And the things I really hate about academic learning is being told to do this and that, having to work so much and get stressed out all the time over it, and even trying hard and trying to do everything right doesn't always result in getting good grades. It's just all really frustrating to me and I generally prefer learning by reading about things in my own leisure whenever I want without the pressure of having to do stressful coursework and exams just to please some examiner, which I'm often no good at. I only did GCSEs and A Levels because it's constantly drummed into us that it's the right thing to do, but now I'm not sure if it's really worth me carrying on to higher education. Even my OU coursework I can't be bothered with because I'm having the same problems again. I know it sounds bad and I hate feeling this way but it's so hard to help . I've made a few posts on TSR about this, and most people advise not going to uni if I don't like studying. I do suffer from depression so I'm not sure if that has much to do with it, but I've heard there are depressed people who manage to get A*s so...
    :console:

    I know how you feel.

    What subject are you studying at OU?

    I think the problem you are finding is the education SYSTEM (memorising, exams, coursework, marks, grades, uni expectations etc) not learning and being educated.

    I love learning and education (and have done so all my life) but have a problem with the education system.

    Is your depression linked to you struggling in school? Did you end up with depression as a result of your struggle at school?
    • 6 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Arekkusu)
    I sometimes enjoy it so much my assignments end up covered in stains.

    Seriously though I'm the sort of person who writes for a bit and then gets on a roll rather than being able to do it in little bits.

    If you aren't enjoying studying it's probably because you don't really understand the scope of the subject, you've just got a couple of random books out of the library. Or it may be because you haven't taken ownership of it - it's someone telling you what to do. This is why it's essential to write about something that actually interests you
    :eek: that's what i'm talking about though. I've not really enjoyed most of my assignments at all.... The've mostly been a total drag that have made me struggle to maintain motivation.
    Otoh being at uni means I have an athens login which has been wonderful for finding stuff, i'll really miss those journal subs when i've finished.
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AidanLunn)
    It's because they spend most of their time indoors alone that makes them depressed, as I said. This would be the same effect of doing staying in alone all the time whether they were studying or not.
    You don't have to shut yourself away to work and do well. There are lots of social study groups that are created at Uni, and many meet friends through their courses.
    • Thread Starter
    • 91 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dee Leigh)
    :console:

    I know how you feel.

    What subject are you studying at OU?

    I think the problem you are finding is the education SYSTEM (memorising, exams, coursework, marks, grades, uni expectations etc) not learning and being educated.

    I love learning and education (and have done so all my life) but have a problem with the education system.

    Is your depression linked to you struggling in school?
    I'm studying a Business Studies module in Understanding Management. It's OK, but it's a bit much and I struggle to keep up with all the tasks and plan an essay. I've never really been "jumping for joy" excited about learning with the OU to be honest; I think I only did it because I felt pressure to try a degree and wanted a taster in higher education, since I don't have the grades to go to any decent brick uni. I'm considering dropping it now as I'm really not doing too good at it.

    I think depression might have had some play in me struggling at uni, but I'm not really too sure. I know other people in my year group who also did badly in their grades, but I doubt they all had depression. Well, at least I know one friend who wasn't depressed but she didn't do well, so it could just be lack of ability or something else. It's quite hard to tell but I am currently trying to get treated for depression and then I can see clearly how things can go from there.
    • 57 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    I am currently doing a course with the Open Uni, but I don't really like it much though. It's probably worse in a way in fact, cos working at home is quite a challenge when there's so many distractions about. I go to the library sometimes to do it, but it's still tiring. I'm also not getting any social life through it, which is such a downer.



    There's probably other reasons why they get depression. Working hard didn't always help me do well personally.
    Maybe being at home is part of the problem. For myself, family problems caused me to do badly in my exams, even when I thought that having ALevels would be something to help me focus on and motivate me.

    Also, working very hard and trying to work smart didn't help me to do well either.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I can't say I enjoy studying but since 6th form my motivation has changed in a positive way. I came out of a music diploma at 18 hoping to get on to the music degree for the second audition running. I didn't get in so I kinda lost hope in what career I wanted to get into. The dream of being a touring drummer slowly left me as I remember wanting to do Accounting and Finance degree a while ago so i UCAS'd it this gap year and got an offer and pretty much ready to give it my all come September. I think it was the importance of choosing a right degree and career that really got me motivated for next year. Since I want to be a Chartered Certified accountant and all I guess I'll have no choice BUT to enjoy studying.
    • 57 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    I'm studying a Business Studies module in Understanding Management. It's OK, but it's a bit much and I struggle to keep up with all the tasks and plan an essay. I've never really been "jumping for joy" excited about learning with the OU to be honest; I think I only did it because I felt pressure to try a degree and wanted a taster in higher education, since I don't have the grades to go to any decent brick uni. I'm considering dropping it now as I'm really not doing too good at it.

    I think depression might have had some play in me struggling at uni, but I'm not really too sure. I know other people in my year group who also did badly in their grades, but I doubt they all had depression. Well, at least I know one friend who wasn't depressed but she didn't do well, so it could just be lack of ability or something else. It's quite hard to tell but I am currently trying to get treated for depression and then I can see clearly how things can go from there.
    I understand...it's very hard to tell.

    Have you thought maybe doing an apprenticeship?
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sr90)
    Finding the motivation to study, however, is nigh on impossible. I'm hoping this changes next year when your marks actually count.
    ...it won't. I have exams in 3 weeks...motivation to revise for them? Zero..

    Anyway I enjoy some modules and dislike others, it's highly unlikely you'll enjoy everything on your course. Though I will say I enjoyed the first year more, I have no passion or motivation at all now..it's not the courses fault..something just seemed to happen in August last year and now I have no real passion for anything, like a switch was flicked in my brain. Ironically I've actually gotten significantly better marks in my assignments this year then I did in year 1..despite me not feeling I've done anything different.
    • 3 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I'm at uni, and I went because it's the 'done thing'. I was doing well at A Level and enjoying my subjects, so it seemed right for me. I picked a course based on what I had enjoyed most so far, and what I thought would give me the best job prospects.

    Now I'm at uni, I absolutely hate it. I have no motivation or willpower to study because the content just doesn't interest me any more. And I still have absolutely no idea what job I want to do when I graduate.

    So, for me, uni has been a bit of a waste of time and money, and I'll be left clueless with an average qualification that more and more people are gaining.

    I'm not saying uni is pointless, just that it isn't right for everyone and, especially with the increased fees, you should really make an effort to question your interest, motivation and dedication before applying.
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I genuinely am passionate about my chosen subject and so yes I do enjoy studying it!
    However, last year I had depression and I did find it incredibly hard to keep working. I just had no motivation for any of my subjects and I didn't enjoy them. Which is probably why I have had to retake my AS year and do AS and A2 at the same time! If I were you I would focus on solving your depression first, and then think about applying to uni, but only if there is a subject you enjoy and want to learn more about. If you're not passionate about the subject, it will just be a waste of time and a miserable 3 years!
    • Thread Starter
    • 91 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dee Leigh)
    Maybe being at home is part of the problem. For myself, family problems caused me to do badly in my exams, even when I thought that having ALevels would be something to help me focus on and motivate me.

    Also, working very hard and trying to work smart didn't help me to do well either.
    I haven't really had massive problems at home. I think my depression is more to do with social and personality problems of mine, such as being bullied, feeling lonely, low self-esteem, etc. I know they're probably slightly pathetic things to get depressed over compared to what other people go through, but I also can't help how I react to things :sad:

    (Original post by Dee Leigh)
    I understand...it's very hard to tell.

    Have you thought maybe doing an apprenticeship?
    I applied to loads last year, but got rejected from every single one. I've found they're just as hard to get as normal jobs, and I've kinda lost the motivation to keep applying for them now
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    not really, i find it super hard to motivate myself.
    some of my degree is more interesting than other parts but most of the time i dont enjoy it all!
    not really sure why i'm there tbh, it was kinda forced upon anybody even slightly academic at my college,
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joinedup)
    :eek: that's what i'm talking about though. I've not really enjoyed most of my assignments at all.... The've mostly been a total drag that have made me struggle to maintain motivation.
    Otoh being at uni means I have an athens login which has been wonderful for finding stuff, i'll really miss those journal subs when i've finished.
    So you're saying you like studying but you don't like studying what other people tell you to do, that's normal. What's your subject, if it's something very "instrumental" to getting a good job, you might find it a right drag. If it's more something you do because you like it like art or history then you will probably find it less of a drag.
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Everyone's different. A lot of people do it to get the degree. People like me do it to get the degree and to learn about a subject I'm passionate about. Parts are still tedious, and yes sometimes I'd rather play a game than read my books, and I don't think a soul on this Earth actually enjoys exams!
    • Thread Starter
    • 91 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by laura94)
    I genuinely am passionate about my chosen subject and so yes I do enjoy studying it!
    However, last year I had depression and I did find it incredibly hard to keep working. I just had no motivation for any of my subjects and I didn't enjoy them. Which is probably why I have had to retake my AS year and do AS and A2 at the same time! If I were you I would focus on solving your depression first, and then think about applying to uni, but only if there is a subject you enjoy and want to learn more about. If you're not passionate about the subject, it will just be a waste of time and a miserable 3 years!
    Yeah, that's what I feel like I should be doing too. For ages I have struggled with getting help for it though, but hopefully now I'm on my way to getting a bit better. It's just annoying cos my parents are pushing me to go to uni and making me feel awkward about not going, but I really don't feel like it right now. I also know there's a risk of feeling worse if uni turns out to be a bad experience for me anyway.
    • 57 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    I haven't really had massive problems at home. I think my depression is more to do with social and personality problems of mine, such as being bullied, feeling lonely, low self-esteem, etc. I know they're probably slightly pathetic things to get depressed over compared to what other people go through, but I also can't help how I react to things :sad:
    Don't think it's pathetic to be upset about those things. It's not surprising tbh. Also it's not good to compare your issues to others...yes people have problems but that doesn't mean your problems are inadequate.

    Have your ever spoken to a careers advisor?
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I love studying, and coursework has been fun too.

    This dissertation though, ugh.
    • Thread Starter
    • 91 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dee Leigh)
    Don't think it's pathetic to be upset about those things. It's not surprising tbh. Also it's not good to compare your issues to others...yes people have problems but that doesn't mean your problems are inadequate.

    Have your ever spoken to a careers advisor?
    Yeah, a few times. I'm thinking of going to see one again soon, as I have some new questions I'd like to ask and get advice on.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: May 11, 2012
New on TSR

GCSE mocks revision

Talk study tips this weekend

Article updates
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.