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Do people who go to uni really enjoy studying?

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    I enjoy it a lot less than I thought I would, to be honest. A few bits and pieces are genuinely really interesting (and thankfully the interesting bits are getting more frequent) but a lot of it is just... effort. And I'm constantly surrounded by people who love their subject, so it's a little depressing, really!
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    yes and no. I don't enjoy the process of slogging through all the actual work, but at the end of it all when I understand something that I didn't previously, it's all worth it. Not gonna pretend I like sitting through long lectures or wading through sets of problems, I don't. **** that.
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    No. Nor did I enjoy A-levels or GCSEs. I've just forced myself through all of it. I'm not averse to learning - I just resent exams, coursework and formal education. I could have probably learnt more by watching TV and visiting museums/art galleries - but that's not going to get me a job is it.
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    you're on tsr, wrong place to ask this question as it doesnt truly reflect the student population. I don't know one person who truly enjoys their subject at uni; uni is a means to an end and that's all it'll ever be imo. Myself? i despise my subject but ive already sunk two sorry years into it and put into that parental pressure... but that's life, nobody ever said it would be fun and games - unless your parents are multi-millionaires/billionaires
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    (Original post by MusicTechnologyStudent)
    I know people who know absolutely NOTHING that they learned in previous years. And they're going to do short term cramming for their exams this year too. And they'll then go out into the wide world having retained very little of what they supposedly "learned" at university.

    so what? when you get into this "wide world" you'll come to realise that none of the **** you learn at uni actually gets used
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    (Original post by abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
    so what? when you get into this "wide world" you'll come to realise that none of the **** you learn at uni actually gets used
    Only if you do a dumb course.
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    (Original post by SayItAintSoJoe)
    Only if you do a dumb course.
    not sure if trolling, but no not really. On the contrary, i'd say the dumb courses are the ones where what you learn actually matters a bit.
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    (Original post by abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
    not sure if trolling
    Right back at you

    EDIT: Okay, I'll humour you. Here's a nice example: Software Engineering!
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    (Original post by SayItAintSoJoe)
    Right back at you

    EDIT: Okay, I'll humour you. Here's a nice example: Software Engineering!
    I'll give you a few more examples

    Civil engineer - accenture
    maths, economics, history, geography, english - finding their way into investment banks (non econ research and non quant roles)
    languages finding their way into the big 4

    I think you'll agree with me that those arent "dumb" subjects and none use what theyve learnt in their course

    unless you go directly into a field, what you learn doesnt count for ****. As for the sciences, i wonder how many people go direct into research heavy roles

    when you go into the "wide world" come back to me and tell me of your experiences
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    (Original post by abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
    I'll give you a few more examples

    Civil engineer - accenture
    maths, economics, history, geography, english - finding their way into investment banks (non econ research and non quant roles)
    languages finding their way into the big 4

    I think you'll agree with me that those arent "dumb" subjects and none use what theyve learnt in their course

    unless you go directly into a field, what you learn doesnt count for ****. As for the sciences, i wonder how many people go direct into research heavy roles

    when you go into the "wide world" come back to me and tell me of your experiences
    erm yeah
    it's not like any civil engineering students actually become civil engineers
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    read my post again - i acknowledge people go directly into fields, but a lot of the time they don't. And besides in civ eng as well as many other subjects where you can go directly into a field, you don't need to remember everything you learn, there are loads of modules you can pick and for many, its just a matter of jumping through hoops

    When you graduate, come back to me and tell me how many of the modules you took came in handy
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    Haha, **** knows tbh :rolleyes:. Probably brainwashed into thinking that's the only way forward in life, like how many people think as well.
    Because they're nigerian but sincerely that's what most people think, including my parents and in some ways I understand. Very few top companies have a school leavers programme (when they do they're extremely competitive and hard to get into) for students who don't what to go to university or study for their A-Levels.

    For most graduate schemes you'll find that they require minimum UCAS points and degree qualifications, if you don't have those in themselves there's no chance of getting into them. That's why there's a lot of emphasis on getting a good degree, it's almost always not because they want to show you off to friends and family at gatherings :rolleyes: (not all the time anyways).
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    Do you very much enjoy studying in general?
    Hellz Naw, I think of it as a chore, like doing dishes and stuff. I'd much rather sit and play videogames and watch movies all day.

    But I can't get paid doing that, and since nobody wants to employ me for a job (apparently, I need experience in something that I can't get experience in because everywhere that I could get experience wants people with experience) So I'm studying at university to try and get experience in something so I can get a steady income.
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    (Original post by abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
    read my post again - i acknowledge people go directly into fields, but a lot of the time they don't. And besides in civ eng as well as many other subjects where you can go directly into a field, you don't need to remember everything you learn, there are loads of modules you can pick and for many, its just a matter of jumping through hoops

    When you graduate, come back to me and tell me how many of the modules you took came in handy
    I know what your point is, but that isn't what you said to begin with, dude. Doesn't really matter now though.
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    (Original post by someonesomewherexx)
    Because they're nigerian but sincerely that's what most people think, including my parents and in some ways I understand. Very few top companies have a school leavers programme (when they do they're extremely competitive and hard to get into) for students who don't what to go to university or study for their A-Levels.

    For most graduate schemes you'll find that they require minimum UCAS points and degree qualifications, if you don't have those in themselves there's no chance of getting into them. That's why there's a lot of emphasis on getting a good degree, it's almost always not because they want to show you off to friends and family at gatherings :rolleyes: (not all the time anyways).
    Yeah, I guess so. I honestly would prefer to be good at studying and be passionate about a subject, but that just isn't happening for me right now as my mind isn't quite in it for some reason, I dunno. In fact, I'm even dropping my OU course this week as I simply can't handle it . Maybe it's the depression, maybe I just need to refresh my head from education for a while.

    It's weird though, because I keep hearing all these stories about how there are plenty of graduates who don't manage to get into graduate jobs, which makes me wonder whether it's really that necessary to get a degree these days unless you really want to, since it doesn't seem like it'd always help. Plus, the high debt that comes with a degree these days, seems like it would balance out the slightly higher graduate salaries, no?
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    Yeah, I guess so. I honestly would prefer to be good at studying and be passionate about a subject, but that just isn't happening for me right now as my mind isn't quite in it for some reason, I dunno. In fact, I'm even dropping my OU course this week as I simply can't handle it . Maybe it's the depression, maybe I just need to refresh my head from education for a while.

    It's weird though, because I keep hearing all these stories about how there are plenty of graduates who don't manage to get into graduate jobs, which makes me wonder whether it's really that necessary to get a degree these days unless you really want to, since it doesn't seem like it'd always help. Plus, the high debt that comes with a degree these days, seems like it would balance out the slightly higher graduate salaries, no?
    Can I be an example? I study computer science at university, I wouldn't honestly call myself passionate about the subject but I don't dislike it. It's hardwork, sometimes it's boring, sometimes I get frustrated and tired but it's extremely REWARDING and WORTH it when I end up with a code(program) that kicks ass or when I solve a difficult maths problem.If I look at the big picture now I'll get depressed because all I'll see is more complex coding for the next two years and work that gets harder, so I don't, I try to focus on the small victories...good test/assignment or exam scores(when I get them anyway) and that's what keeps me going.Take it step by step.

    About graduate jobs, this is all they want 1) Good qualifications 2:1 or a first class .2)PERSONALITY (it's important, I guess they want to see if you can fit into the work environment or whatever .3) CONFIDENCE(I need more of that) .4)KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE ORGANISATION AND WHAT YOUR CAREER ENTAILS which goes without saying. There are other attributes organisations might require, it varies from profession to profession,but those 4 are pretty standard. There's also interview, assessment centres and all that, and the only way you can get through those is PREPARATION nothing more. Yes I think degrees are very important for some careers unless you happen to have connections(even I don't know how that works).There is debt yes, but if you take loans make sure it's worth it, make sure you come out with a good degree there's no point being in all that debt and having nothing to show for it.Those high graduate salaries are only from a few "professions".If you are looking to balance your debt out immediately out of university, you know where the money lies. I have written a lot of **** i see, thanks if you bother to read it all.
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    I do enjoy studying and it comes fairly easily to me - it helps that I genuinely like the subject i'm studying at uni, it's not so much a chore to revise/write essays/go to lectures etc.

    It's possible that studying just isn't for you OP, it doesn't suit everyone. However, it's up to you whether you think it's worth slogging it out at uni just to get a degree, enjoyable or not.
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    (Original post by bammzie)
    Hellz Naw, I think of it as a chore, like doing dishes and stuff. I'd much rather sit and play videogames and watch movies all day.

    But I can't get paid doing that, and since nobody wants to employ me for a job (apparently, I need experience in something that I can't get experience in because everywhere that I could get experience wants people with experience) So I'm studying at university to try and get experience in something so I can get a steady income.
    Hmm, this is interesting to read, as I hear about a lot of graduates with good degrees who struggle to get jobs because they have no work experience. Are you doing a placement year or getting work experience through your uni?

    (Original post by Antifazian)
    I do enjoy studying and it comes fairly easily to me - it helps that I genuinely like the subject i'm studying at uni, it's not so much a chore to revise/write essays/go to lectures etc.

    It's possible that studying just isn't for you OP, it doesn't suit everyone. However, it's up to you whether you think it's worth slogging it out at uni just to get a degree, enjoyable or not.
    Hmm, well some people say I should just go to uni anyway for the social life and "finding myself", but some people say that isn't a good idea if I don't like studying. So yeah, that decision is a bit tricky.
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    Hmm, this is interesting to read, as I hear about a lot of graduates with good degrees who struggle to get jobs because they have no work experience. Are you doing a placement year or getting work experience through your uni?
    I'm gonna apply for placement next year, but I think I'd probably be best asking my dad if I can do a placement at his work as I want to go into conservation and he works on a country estate :P

    Without my contacts, I'd probably not get a placement.
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    I enjoy some topics on my course, others are just plain boring and a pain in the ass. Thank God my uni is flexible with changing your course so besides my major I had to do 2 minors in the first year and then dropped my major (English) which was absolutely awful.

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Updated: May 11, 2012
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