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The career path of 'finance' and similar careers - ambition or greed?

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    I just read a thread in the finance and accountancy sub-forum. Here it is -

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...1#post37157511

    Now there's nothing wrong with it but to me reading that over; I found it quite a morbid, soulless thread. So empty.

    I'm not stating anything obvious here but obv. bankers etc tend to be the types driven by money and in most cases very selfish/greedy types.

    But is it really ambition that drives them? Or do their brains see the $$$ and let their hedonistic human greed drive them to satisfy their ego's? I think the latter. It's like people look up to and admire these young people working in big corporate or banking companies because it's a swwaannkkyy well paying inner city job ... but really it's their love for money that paints their personality rather than any academic accolade.

    What I find sad is that young people are driven to go into these types of careers. It's like there's no humanitarian side .. it all seems so orientated around nothing else but money. Wouldn't you want to go into a career where the job will bring joy to you, and will bring joy to others which will in turn bring more joy to you? A teacher wants to teach because it'll bring them joy to teach people and educate them. Are they at 17/18/19/20 already plotting their moves and knowing all the top schools to get into and so forth? Not exactly.

    I guess my point is I find it sad that young people want to go into this investment banking/finance industry. To me it says something about them as people in a negative light. Highlights their soulless self and their high-maintenance ego. I'm convinced these people pursue this career to look cool, and to gain recognition in a way which satisfies their own smarmy pride and self-righteousness ... as well as the lucrative pay.

    People slate footballers and young footballers are looked down on because they are typically uneducated and get paid handsomely for kicking a ball around. But these banker/finance youngsters are just as bad. Infact their values are even worse than footballers I would say.

    What do you think?
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    What drives them is probably both ambition and greed. Greed is selfish as is, in many cases, ambition. But, of course, ambition is important because without it people would rarely succeed at doing things at all. There can be no doubt that people are driven by money, but people are driven by other things as well, not just money. Certain individuals focus completely on money so that it becomes an end in itself; this is often accompanied by the pyschology of insecurity. Insecure individuals often fear that they may find themselves without money or wealth, and so to that end they work a lot (usually to the extent that they become workaholics) and save for the future. Insecurity usually sets-in during hard economic times or when social divisions (i.e., to the social scale) become more apparent..a bit like now.
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    (Original post by Skill)
    I just read a thread in the finance and accountancy sub-forum. Here it is -

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...1#post37157511

    Now there's nothing wrong with it but to me reading that over; I found it quite a morbid, soulless thread. So empty.

    I'm not stating anything obvious here but obv. bankers etc tend to be the types driven by money and in most cases very selfish/greedy types.

    But is it really ambition that drives them? Or do their brains see the $$$ and let their hedonistic human greed drive them to satisfy their ego's? I think the latter. It's like people look up to and admire these young people working in big corporate or banking companies because it's a s****y well paying inner city job ... but really it's their love for money that paints their personality rather than any academic accolade.

    What I find sad is that young people are driven to go into these types of careers. It's like there's no humanitarian side .. it all seems so orientated around nothing else but money. Wouldn't you want to go into a career where the job will bring joy to you, and will bring joy to others which will in turn bring more joy to you? A teacher wants to teach because it'll bring them joy to teach people and educate them. Are they at 17/18/19/20 already plotting their moves and knowing all the top schools to get into and so forth? Not exactly.

    I guess my point is I find it sad that young people want to go into this investment banking/finance industry. To me it says something about them as people in a negative light. Highlights their soulless self and their high-maintenance ego. I'm convinced these people pursue this career to look cool, and to gain recognition in a way which satisfies their own smarmy pride and self-righteousness ... as well as the lucrative pay.

    People slate footballers and young footballers are looked down on because they are typically uneducated and get paid handsomely for kicking a ball around. But these banker/finance youngsters are just as bad. Infact their values are even worse than footballers I would say.

    What do you think?
    Don't have very much to say, but some people may actually be interested in the field. Obviously that guy was just in it for the money though, that's pretty clear.

    Don't really like the bolded. Why are you insinuating that footballer's values are bad? They love a sport, turn out to be naturally talented (as well as working hard at it) at the sport and get paid for it. They don't decide what they get paid; the public do (with their viewer-ship).

    It's pretty clear you've got a bit of an agenda to slate bankers etc. but you're clumping a lot of people into one narrow-view. Okay money is almost always somewhat of an important factor (and to SOME it may be the only factor) but some people might enjoy the intensity of the job, the ability required (if they're in a more mathematical role - it may be one of the few careers that can stretch their ability that isn't mathematical research), or the actual subject (some people are very interested in how the stock market moves and analysing what factors cause these shifts) and other things too.
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    I think that bankers and people who work in finance at the top levels are highly educated and put a lot of time and effort into their careers. I know quite a few people who work in the financial sector and they enjoy their work, is it as exciting as being a ninja rocket scientist? No but very few jobs are.

    Ambition is subjective, an athlete might strive to become the best in their field while a entrepreneur might strive to become the richest man alive, neither is more "valid" than the other and there is absolutely nothing wrong with wanting to have lots of money or pay being your primary motivator in taking a job.

    Basically i have no problem with them, whatever drives their desire to work in finance is their prerogative. Honestly i look down on people who would label a whole sector of workers as greedy and selfish based on what they probably read in the guardian.
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    If you haven't experienced the industry, don't be jumping to conclusions about everyone. There are bad, greedy people everywhere and good, hardworking people everywhere too.

    Basing on a thread and responses within the thread doesn't speak on everyone behalf of the industry.
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    If that guy knew anything about finance, he would have heard of the efficient market hypothesis. EMH states that prices in the market reflect all available information. It can fairly easily be applied to this problem of wages - if this chap thinks he is the only one to suddenly think of trying to find a high paid job without 'maths GCSE at A*' (utter *******s btw), he is very much mistaken. You can even bring it down to supply and demand analysis. There will be so much competition for these jobs, that even if they don't require such a high grade at maths GCSE, you won't get the job unless you're of a level of ability that commands A* at GCSE maths...

    Either way, this man is a soulless moron, coming from a soon to be first class economics and finance grad, probably destined to be in one of these city jobs. Whether it is well paid or not doesn't really bother me, as long as its enough to survive comfortably in London.
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    (Original post by hassi94)
    Don't have very much to say, but some people may actually be interested in the field. Obviously that guy was just in it for the money though, that's pretty clear.

    Don't really like the bolded. Why are you insinuating that footballer's values are bad? They love a sport, turn out to be naturally talented (as well as working hard at it) at the sport and get paid for it. They don't decide what they get paid; the public do (with their viewer-ship).

    It's pretty clear you've got a bit of an agenda to slate bankers etc. but you're clumping a lot of people into one narrow-view. Okay money is almost always somewhat of an important factor (and to SOME it may be the only factor) but some people might enjoy the intensity of the job, the ability required (if they're in a more mathematical role - it may be one of the few careers that can stretch their ability that isn't mathematical research), or the actual subject (some people are very interested in how the stock market moves and analysing what factors cause these shifts) and other things too.
    Actually I wasn't slating footballers at all. The point I was trying to get across, is that people slate footballers ( I don't ). But people kind of look up to and applaud people working in top finance firms in the city for example. At least footballers started out doing something that they actually loved to do and money was INITIALLY secondary. But with these banker types they are nothing but money. But its like if you're a banker or whatever people are impressed simply because it's some cool job. But actually the footballer is the honest person who initially took up the sport through their love for it whereas the banker is just driven by his own self greed. Unofortunately footballers get alot of slack because their education as a whole isn't great and of course they get alot of money.
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    (Original post by Skill)
    What do you think?
    I think, sorry know, that I'm going into the industry because I actually enjoy the work. Thanks for generalising me though! Judging by your other threads you seem to have an obsession with showing yourself as 'the enlightened one' and others whom you disagree with as brainless / boring automatons. It's a bit sad.
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    (Original post by fourdigit)
    If you haven't experienced the industry, don't be jumping to conclusions about everyone. There are bad, greedy people everywhere and good, hardworking people everywhere too.

    Basing on a thread and responses within the thread doesn't speak on everyone behalf of the industry.
    You say that but everyone slates footballers. So tell the world that too will you!
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    (Original post by Skill)

    What I find sad is that young people are driven to go into these types of careers. It's like there's no humanitarian side .. it all seems so orientated around nothing else but money. Wouldn't you want to go into a career where the job will bring joy to you, and will bring joy to others which will in turn bring more joy to you? A teacher wants to teach because it'll bring them joy to teach people and educate them. Are they at 17/18/19/20 already plotting their moves and knowing all the top schools to get into and so forth? Not exactly.
    :lol: could you be any more naive? half the teachers at my school hated what they did. Lots of teachers fall into the career as a last resort, rather than some sort of calling from God. They saw it, as a way to make money, similar to the way 'some' bankers see their job. However, people find it much easier to target bankers, because of how much they work, despite the downsides of the industry.
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    is it bad:

    I would give my left testicle for a gig in high finance. (goldman sachs)
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    (Original post by Skill)
    You say that but everyone slates footballers. So tell the world that too will you!
    Well your response to mine is invalid because my response was not directed to that. It's finance.
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    (Original post by Darth Stewie)
    I think that bankers and people who work in finance at the top levels are highly educated and put a lot of time and effort into their careers. I know quite a few people who work in the financial sector and they enjoy their work, is it as exciting as being a ninja rocket scientist? No but very few jobs are.

    Ambition is subjective, an athlete might strive to become the best in their field while a entrepreneur might strive to become the richest man alive, neither is more "valid" than the other and there is absolutely nothing wrong with wanting to have lots of money or pay being your primary motivator in taking a job.

    Basically i have no problem with them, whatever drives their desire to work in finance is their prerogative. Honestly i look down on people who would label a whole sector of workers as greedy and selfish based on what they probably read in the guardian.
    I don't think there's anything wrong in wanting money and it motivating you. But most of these banker types are ONLY driven by that. I know a number of these people, I get a gist for what they want out of life. It is usually a life of hedonism.

    Also you are right. Ambition is subjective and wanting to be filthy rich is not less valid than an athlete who wants to be the best in their field. But the fact still stands that the ambition to be filthy rich is a narcissistic, hedonistic type of existence. Shallow and empty. The athlete who strives to be the best in their field - will feel satisfied as a person because they have actually achieved their goals (which weren't money orientated) - and the money came along as a result. Their goal was not the money, but their love for their 100m sprint for example. The money is secondary. To be driven by money is good .. I'd say healthy. But much more satisfying and respectable is when people achieve their ambitions and goals in their field - with money coming secondary. To simply SEEK money is UGLY.
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    (Original post by goape)
    I think, sorry know, that I'm going into the industry because I actually enjoy the work. Thanks for generalising me though! Judging by your other threads you seem to have an obsession with showing yourself as 'the enlightened one' and others whom you disagree with as brainless / boring automatons. It's a bit sad.
    It's called having an opinion. I'm not a shallow, selfish, sheep.
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    (Original post by ebam_uk)
    is it bad:

    I would give my left testicle for a gig in high finance. (goldman sachs)
    no. I feel the same, naija boy :ninja:
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    (Original post by Tsunami2011)
    :lol: could you be any more naive? half the teachers at my school hated what they did. Lots of teachers fall into the career as a last resort, rather than some sort of calling from God. They saw it, as a way to make money, similar to the way 'some' bankers see their job. However, people find it much easier to target bankers, because of how much they work, despite the downsides of the industry.
    Whether you like it or not teachers go into the profession because they get joy out of teaching others. Their pay is nothing special. Their money is nothing compared to what bankers get. So frankly, I don't know what your point is.
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    (Original post by fourdigit)
    If you haven't experienced the industry, don't be jumping to conclusions about everyone. There are bad, greedy people everywhere and good, hardworking people everywhere too.

    Basing on a thread and responses within the thread doesn't speak on everyone behalf of the industry.
    The financial industry thrives on people who are exceptionally efficient in their job; to that end, it often requires driven and highly motivated individuals who will put money and the desire for wealth before anything else, including the community and other human beings. I don't need to experience the industry (of finance) to know or see the effects of what can be achieved when money (and profit) is put before human beings.
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    (Original post by goape)
    I think, sorry know, that I'm going into the industry because I actually enjoy the work. Thanks for generalising me though! Judging by your other threads you seem to have an obsession with showing yourself as 'the enlightened one' and others whom you disagree with as brainless / boring automatons. It's a bit sad.
    Even if it was sad, it could be a waste of time, but it isn't necessarily wrong.
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    (Original post by Skill)
    I don't think there's anything wrong in wanting money and it motivating you. But most of these banker types are ONLY driven by that. I know a number of these people, I get a gist for what they want out of life. It is usually a life of hedonism.

    Also you are right. Ambition is subjective and wanting to be filthy rich is not less valid than an athlete who wants to be the best in their field. But the fact still stands that the ambition to be filthy rich is a narcissistic, hedonistic type of existence. Shallow and empty. The athlete who strives to be the best in their field - will feel satisfied as a person because they have actually achieved their goals (which weren't money orientated) - and the money came along as a result. Their goal was not the money, but their love for their 100m sprint for example. The money is secondary. To be driven by money is good .. I'd say healthy. But much more satisfying and respectable is when people achieve their ambitions and goals in their field - with money coming secondary. To simply SEEK money is UGLY.
    But why is seeking money so bad? I personally would need to have other things for me to be satisfied (being challenged intellectually would probably be at the forefront) but what if someone did just want money? They wanted to put tonnes of effort in so they can get things they enjoy; they may be supercar enthusiasts or hobbyist house-designers. They may want to travel to every part of the world. It's hard to do that kind of thing without a lot of money. Athletes strive to be the best for SELFISH reasons. They want to be better than anyone else. So what if you want to be richer than anyone else?
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    (Original post by Skill)
    I don't think there's anything wrong in wanting money and it motivating you. But most of these banker types are ONLY driven by that. I know a number of these people, I get a gist for what they want out of life. It is usually a life of hedonism.

    Also you are right. Ambition is subjective and wanting to be filthy rich is not less valid than an athlete who wants to be the best in their field. But the fact still stands that the ambition to be filthy rich is a narcissistic, hedonistic type of existence. Shallow and empty. The athlete who strives to be the best in their field - will feel satisfied as a person because they have actually achieved their goals (which weren't money orientated) - and the money came along as a result. Their goal was not the money, but their love for their 100m sprint for example. The money is secondary. To be driven by money is good .. I'd say healthy. But much more satisfying and respectable is when people achieve their ambitions and goals in their field - with money coming secondary. To simply SEEK money is UGLY.
    and that entrepreneur might feel just as satisfied as that athlete when they make their first million. Money buys things, the vast majority of people will not just land in money doing the thing they love, if people want to provide a better life for their family or for themselves money is the way to do that. This assumption that all bankers are hedonistic is completely unfounded and many people who do work in finance or want to work in finance also want a family life. Some people get their highs through sport, some get their highs through making money. trying to label one as morally superior based on your values is simply foolish, you aren't the moral emperor of the world.

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