Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Careers Advice Cambridge - Careers Service Not Helpful

Announcements Posted on
Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Essentially, I really need some advice not on how to get into a particular career (that's easy enough to find out) but on what careers might be out there that I haven't thought of, and what sort of industries I might be able to enter with my degree. I've asked the Cambridge Careers Service but they refused to arrange an appointment with me until I could decide which career I wanted. They said I had to know what I wanted to go into before they could give me advice, which goes against what I though the purpose of a careers service was. I mean, if I wanted to be a lawyer, or a mechanical engineer or a systems analyst or something I'd just look up how to go into that industry. Surely the people who really need advice are those who -don't- know what to do. Well, really they're obviously both important, but I thought it was a bit crap that they only let you make an appointment if you already know what you want to do.

    So my question is, is there anyone else I should speak to about this? I'd just like a bit of advice on the sort of things philosophers do...
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Really? I know plenty of people who had appointments or got help from the Careers Service when they didn't know. You should probably use the careers service website to see what typical careers philosophers go into. They probably want you to have a general idea of the qualities you want in a job
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Well I phoned them three times and each time they said we can only arrange an appointment for you if you know what you want to do because otherwise we won't know who to give you an appointment with. They're ok if you have a general idea (law, computer-things, something to do with politics) but in my experience they're not great if you have -no- idea at all.
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Also, love your name and profile pic. Yes.
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Ok. That isn't great. Well I suggest you look on the careers website to see what philosophers tend to do. Try here and on Gradlink
    • 14 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bimbleby)
    Essentially, I really need some advice not on how to get into a particular career (that's easy enough to find out) but on what careers might be out there that I haven't thought of, and what sort of industries I might be able to enter with my degree. I've asked the Cambridge Careers Service but they refused to arrange an appointment with me until I could decide which career I wanted. They said I had to know what I wanted to go into before they could give me advice, which goes against what I though the purpose of a careers service was. I mean, if I wanted to be a lawyer, or a mechanical engineer or a systems analyst or something I'd just look up how to go into that industry. Surely the people who really need advice are those who -don't- know what to do. Well, really they're obviously both important, but I thought it was a bit crap that they only let you make an appointment if you already know what you want to do.

    So my question is, is there anyone else I should speak to about this? I'd just like a bit of advice on the sort of things philosophers do...
    Financial consulting, law, teaching, journalism, academia..

    Obviously just throwing things out; might be interested in some of these
    • 9 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bimbleby)
    Well I phoned them three times and each time they said we can only arrange an appointment for you if you know what you want to do because otherwise we won't know who to give you an appointment with.
    You're supposed to shimmy your butt down there and read the library of material they have on the shelves there which gives plenty of ideas. There are shelves of books and handouts to take away on 'what to do with X degree'. They don't have the manpower to deal with basic - 'I've no idea what I want to do' starting point on a personal, face-to-face basis. They give you the resources to work the basics out for yourself and research ideas. Then when you've narrowed it down to an idea, they can fix you up with an advisor with experience in that career area, who can help you hone your application. It's your life, you're supposed to help yourself a little bit!
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    You're supposed to shimmy your butt down there and read the library of material they have on the shelves there which gives plenty of ideas. There are shelves of books and handouts to take away on 'what to do with X degree'. They don't have the manpower to deal with basic - 'I've no idea what I want to do' starting point on a personal, face-to-face basis. They give you the resources to work the basics out for yourself and research ideas. Then when you've narrowed it down to an idea, they can fix you up with an advisor with experience in that career area, who can help you hone your application. It's your life, you're supposed to help yourself a little bit!
    I've read all those. I'm not a moron. They all have the same limited range of careers that make me want to die. They also send out those crappy books with all the different companies for whom you can do essentially the same kind of managerial job. Trust me, I've been looking into a lot of stuff, but it would be helpful to talk through with someone my specific interests and abilities and see if they have any suggestions I haven't thought of. You can still feel like you have 'no idea' even if you've done a lot of thinking, a lot of research, and read all the ****ty leaflets. They have the manpower to give out pointless information about how to get into management consultancy person to person, despite the fact that that information is available everywhere you look, so I don't think it's as simple as that. I'd say they ought to invest the manpower in people who need more general help instead of people who need the very specific advice, since the specific advice is easily accessible in those books and on the internet. It's much harder to look into a career if you don't know it exists.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Would you mind sharing with us what your interests and skills are? I guess we can't find a job for you on here, but it might help finding a starting point that you can go to an adviser with.

    You could also try going on http://www.careers.cam.ac.uk/library...isersAreas.asp (Raven login needed) where you can check a list of areas/industries that the individual advisers specialise in. I think it is fairly exhaustive in terms of general areas of work that graduates can get into.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bimbleby)
    I've read all those. I'm not a moron. They all have the same limited range of careers that make me want to die. They also send out those crappy books with all the different companies for whom you can do essentially the same kind of managerial job. Trust me, I've been looking into a lot of stuff, but it would be helpful to talk through with someone my specific interests and abilities and see if they have any suggestions I haven't thought of. You can still feel like you have 'no idea' even if you've done a lot of thinking, a lot of research, and read all the ****ty leaflets. They have the manpower to give out pointless information about how to get into management consultancy person to person, despite the fact that that information is available everywhere you look, so I don't think it's as simple as that. I'd say they ought to invest the manpower in people who need more general help instead of people who need the very specific advice, since the specific advice is easily accessible in those books and on the internet. It's much harder to look into a career if you don't know it exists.
    Ok, so you don't seem too keen on grad schemes (neither am I, so I decided not to apply for any). What do you do in your spare time? I'm a languages student and I like travelling (I have a specific academic interest in a particular area of the world), so I'm going there next year to teach English and then I'll decide whether to carry on with that or do something else (was considering postgrads and also journalism). I think what I'm trying to say is that you don't have to decide what you want to do for the rest of your life RIGHT NOW (even if it feels scary when everyone else already seems to know), but just focus on something you'd like to do in the short term and then if you like that, see where it could take you long term. And your interests and hobbies might give you more of a clue of what to do than your degree.

    And if you're having trouble narrowing it down enough to get an appointment with a careers adviser, just pick the career which sounds least bad and use that to get an appointment...they'll probably suggest other things that you hadn't even thought of during your appointment.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: April 27, 2012
New on TSR
Article updates
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.