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Triumph of Elizabeth A2 AQA June 12th Exam

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    Personally, the most horrendous question would be one based upon 'Local Government' - how terrible would that be. :confused:
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    (Original post by et cetera)
    Personally, the most horrendous question would be one based upon 'Local Government' - how terrible would that be. :confused:
    don't worry bro, that ones unlikely. but, i was worried about that too so i've revised quite a bit of local government this morning, it's actually quite a simple topic and one which is easy to link to parliament and the privy council. If you have it, i'd highly reccomend A.G Smith's 'The emergence of a nation state'
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    (Original post by confusedexcited)
    don't worry bro, that ones unlikely. but, i was worried about that too so i've revised quite a bit of local government this morning, it's actually quite a simple topic and one which is easy to link to parliament and the privy council. If you have it, i'd highly reccomend A.G Smith's 'The emergence of a nation state'
    I don't suppose you have any useful information on local government? We didn't bother with that in class at all...
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    (Original post by Harry.K)
    Cheers for the advice, much appreciate it! I'm having a bit of a problem though with the essay structure, because I know the content needed to answer the question but I'm not sure how to structure it. Could you give some pointers on how to structure an essay, especially in terms of sypnoticity please?
    The key to the exam is synopticity which is how u manage to get in the top band.

    So say how factors interrelate: so how the religious problem between the Catholics pushed the foreign policy which was dictated by the government (according to William MacCaffrey) and mainly individuals such as William Cecil, Lord Burghley. Hence a three way link in this example. Use as many factors as possible so how the Socio-Economic problems of riots in London, Kent and Oxfordshire affected the ability of winning the war with Spain as well as the problem of the people in government (so Robert Cecil being anti-war due to the lack of English resources and Leicester being pro-war as shown in the Azores Expedition of 1597 - an example of Faction).

    On top of that, criticise the historiography and use judgment. So say how the Neale argument of a "Puritan Choir" can not be true since she was a Protestant in belief (however ritually she wanted a Catholic ritual as shown with the Vestinarian Controversy of 1566) and the fact that she was more pushed by the Catholics in the House of Commons (the Jones argument).

    Change over time is another synoptic tool. So saying how relations with France started off low but gradually became better (also say how the Treaty of Troyes was a turning point in this). In comparison, the relations with Spain were the exact opposite.

    Lack of evidence to prove a point so the Pardon patents during the 1569 Northern Rebellion are not enough pieces of evidence to show that the government of Elizabeth was weak at managing to gain control of the people of the Periphery and it could have been more to do with the Religious aspect in pushing the rebellion (Thomas Marcombe saying how St Cutherbert of Durham was "more than a saint" and so the burnings of the Cuthbert banner by the wife of Dean Whittingham affected the rebels and pushed them to rebel over the feudal loyalties).

    The conclusion must relate back to your introduction (which has your line of argument) and make sure that u have enough judgement as this is what gets you an A or an A* since examiners want you to evaluate the evidence and the facts with what you think.

    Good Luck - btw i'm learning a topic a day and i've got some important pieces to do so don't worry - a topic a day.
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    (Original post by MalleusMaleficarum)
    I don't suppose you have any useful information on local government? We didn't bother with that in class at all...
    Nor did we, but A.G Smith does the entire topic in a neatly named chapter, if you have it I'd reccomend it.

    There are few actual acts or procolomations relating to the topic, the general jist is that the parish became the main administrative bloc of the state (standard religious unity arguments can be constructed from this) in particular this is a trend following the increasing responsibilities of the JPs. I think you can make a lot of this, it's a transition from a feudal system whereby the landowner controls a region by having a monopoly over capital into a legally adjucaiated system with a degree of moral and legal accountability to the centeral state. IF this came up in a question, I think the standard response would be increasing governmental effiency, which could be tracked back to Cromwell. Guy has an interesting section on the 1590s where he describes the 'increasing trend of a reliance on legal, rather than feudal justice.' JPs had more responsibility, Book of Orders in (I think) 93 and 95 were an example of this. There's some facts and figures I could dig out for you.

    I mean, there's a whole lot more, but frankly I think it's an extremely unlikely topic to come up because it's such an under-researched area, much like private members bills in Parliament, there's a wealth of analysis on Government bills, but tiny amounts on the VAST number of bills which had no relation to what Elizabeth termed 'state matters'.
    (Original post by alvinator)
    On top of that, criticise the historiography and use judgment. So say how the Neale argument of a "Puritan Choir" can not be true since she was a Protestant in belief (however ritually she wanted a Catholic ritual as shown with the Vestinarian Controversy of 1566) and the fact that she was more pushed by the Catholics in the House of Commons (the Jones argument).

    Lack of evidence to prove a point so the Pardon patents during the 1569 Northern Rebellion are not enough pieces of evidence to show that the government of Elizabeth was weak at managing to gain control of the people of the Periphery and it could have been more to do with the Religious aspect in pushing the rebellion (Thomas Marcombe saying how St Cutherbert of Durham was "more than a saint" and so the burnings of the Cuthbert banner by the wife of Dean Whittingham affected the rebels and pushed them to rebel over the feudal loyalties).
    Be careful with the Jones argument over Parliament, he seems to have disregarded the fact that:

    1) Almost all MPs were chosen indirectly by the state, , Cecil himself was responsible for 30 MPs, therefore most MPs were Protestant, notably Lecisters MPs tended to be part of the 'puritan choir'.

    2) There were no Catholics in the Parliament, there may have been some English-Catholics, but no Catholics. All MPs had been required to swear the Oath of Supremacy in 1559.

    3) I think arguing that she wanted a Catholic service is reeeally over-stretching the point. Elizabeth had almost no interest in theological debates, I mean, the religious settlement is essentially Cranmer's book 1552 in a fancy font.. I think it's strong evidence for her attempting to avoid moving the Settlement towards either end of the religious spectrum, her conservatism is not so much towards old religion, but maintaining English unity. Hence, Elizabeth appointed moderate Arch-Bishops, she coulda appointed Field or Cartwright, but she went with Parker, Grindal and Whitgift.

    Also, I don't understand at all your argument over the 1569 Rebellion, it wasn't a populist rebellion at all, it can be contrasted against the 1536 PoG which was a populist movement against the deconstruction of the religious status quo, the 1569 was a small group of nobles attempting to depose the monarch for the advancement of firstly their faction, as Mary was a percieved to be a weaker monarch, and secondly their religion. Therefore, the religious aspect was justification, as opposed to motivation.

    By the way, I'm trying to provoke debate, being forced to defend your position is the best way to increase your understanding of the argument!
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    (Original post by confusedexcited)
    Nor did we, but A.G Smith does the entire topic in a neatly named chapter, if you have it I'd reccomend it.

    There are few actual acts or procolomations relating to the topic, the general jist is that the parish became the main administrative bloc of the state (standard religious unity arguments can be constructed from this) in particular this is a trend following the increasing responsibilities of the JPs. I think you can make a lot of this, it's a transition from a feudal system whereby the landowner controls a region by having a monopoly over capital into a legally adjucaiated system with a degree of moral and legal accountability to the centeral state. IF this came up in a question, I think the standard response would be increasing governmental effiency, which could be tracked back to Cromwell. Guy has an interesting section on the 1590s where he describes the 'increasing trend of a reliance on legal, rather than feudal justice.' JPs had more responsibility, Book of Orders in (I think) 93 and 95 were an example of this. There's some facts and figures I could dig out for you.

    I mean, there's a whole lot more, but frankly I think it's an extremely unlikely topic to come up because it's such an under-researched area, much like private members bills in Parliament, there's a wealth of analysis on Government bills, but tiny amounts on the VAST number of bills which had no relation to what Elizabeth termed 'state matters'.
    Thanks. I do have some notes on Smith's book, but increasing the number/function of JPs, shifting more duties to the parish and revolutionising the Lord Lieutenancies seems to cover it. Still, I'm certain that there won't be a question on the localities per se - at most it'll be a paragraph in a question on Elizabethan government, and as far as I can tell there are no past paper questions on that subject so it's unlikely to come up (and if it does, I'm unlikely to pick it :P). It's best to be prepared though.
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    Can somebody give me an example of a synoptic link? Or even more general advice on technique for writing essays? I particularly don't get synoptic links. Please, I'm begging you, somebody, help.
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    Does anybody know the rough grade boundaries for this paper? I know they vary each year but it would be nice to know what kind of marks I should be aiming for to achieve my aspired grade.
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    (Original post by kelishasheppard)
    Does anybody know the rough grade boundaries for this paper? I know they vary each year but it would be nice to know what kind of marks I should be aiming for to achieve my aspired grade.
    Search 'AQA ums converter' into google that should tell you what marks u need. Just select the a2 and his3b from the dropdown and click convert multiple marks.
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    Now can somebody help me with my question???? ^^^^
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    (Original post by deathhead)
    Now can somebody help me with my question???? ^^^^
    'Synoptic' - Showing your knowledge of the whole period of Elizabeth's reign; for example showing how relations with Spain, began as reasonably cordially under Mary before rapidly defending into war under Elizabeth.

    Something like that. Hope it helps.
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    I am really confused with Purtians and the threat they pose-I get the fact they werent directly targetting Elizabeth and more her religious settlement but cant remember any specific facts

    also I am not entirely sure about the Puritan choir

    Is it likely Purtians will come up-my teacher does think so, I am more praying theres a comparison between catholic and puritan threats-any predictions would be really useful!
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    I'm feeling quiiiite worried about this exam, especially because i have another the day after. Sort of doing last minute revision, but its quite hard when i can't remember everything that i've learnt. Its quite useful to go through this forum and http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...573337&page=11 this because it shows different students opinions on the opinions that are taken (like that there was a mid-tudor crisis). Otherwise i have no idea how to revise, ideas?
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    (Original post by et cetera)
    'Synoptic' - Showing your knowledge of the whole period of Elizabeth's reign; for example showing how relations with Spain, began as reasonably cordially under Mary before rapidly defending into war under Elizabeth.

    Something like that. Hope it helps.
    Ok that sheds some light thanks. But how would I do that in an essay? Does it have to be like change over time or awareness of things affecting other things going one at one time? Please could you give an example?
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    (Original post by hisalice)
    I'm feeling quiiiite worried about this exam, especially because i have another the day after. Sort of doing last minute revision, but its quite hard when i can't remember everything that i've learnt. Its quite useful to go through this forum and http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...573337&page=11 this because it shows different students opinions on the opinions that are taken (like that there was a mid-tudor crisis). Otherwise i have no idea how to revise, ideas?
    Writing half decent notes, imagining questions and answering them. Historical interpretation is really good cuz I think cuz it helps you with ur own argument. And the rest of my waking hours spent worrying about it.
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    (Original post by deathhead)
    Search 'AQA ums converter' into google that should tell you what marks u need. Just select the a2 and his3b from the dropdown and click convert multiple marks.
    THANK YOU! Much appreciated! Wow, the grades seem rather low for this exam in comparison to other exams I've taken..
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    (Original post by kelishasheppard)
    THANK YOU! Much appreciated! Wow, the grades seem rather low for this exam in comparison to other exams I've taken..
    tthat's because it's reaallly bloody difficult..

    (Original post by deathhead)
    Ok that sheds some light thanks. But how would I do that in an essay? Does it have to be like change over time or awareness of things affecting other things going one at one time? Please could you give an example?
    Synopicity can be incredibly difficult to work into an essay, I find often the best way is to juxtapose your analysis of one event against another, like Northern Rebellion vs. PoG, it demonstrates broad knowledge.
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    (Original post by Snoozy94)
    I am really confused with Purtians and the threat they pose-I get the fact they werent directly targetting Elizabeth and more her religious settlement but cant remember any specific facts

    also I am not entirely sure about the Puritan choir

    Is it likely Purtians will come up-my teacher does think so, I am more praying theres a comparison between catholic and puritan threats-any predictions would be really useful!
    Here's my condensed version of the Puritan threat to Elizabeth's church. It doesn't have all the facts, dates e.t.c. which you should have notes on, but this format makes the whole concept far easier to understand: looking at it in stages makes writing essays on the topic far easier (at least it did for me).

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    Stage I – Challenging the Settlement

    Almost immediately, the Puritans began to throw challenges at the Church Settlement which they viewed as incomplete. According to the Neale thesis, this trend began even in the 1559 Parliament which conceived the Settlement, as the ‘Puritan Choir’ forced the Queen to construct a Settlement far more radical than the one which she had envisaged. Certainly Puritan opposition became apparent in 1563 with the introduction of six extra, radical Articles in Convocation which were defeated by a single vote. This continued with the Vestiarian Controversy of 1566, which saw the deprivations of numerous clergy (some 37) and even warranted the intervention of a notable Continental reformer, Heinrich Bullinger, who warned that Puritan radicals threatened the progress of the Reformation in England. In 1571, Strickland proposed a more radical Prayer Book in Parliament, one ‘purified’ of all ‘popish’ remnants which were key to ensuring the success and acceptance of the 1559 edition: the veto of the Alphabet Bills provoked a strong anti-Puritan backlash.

    In short, Puritan elements threw continual challenges at the 1559 Religious Settlement, often targeting the characteristics which were vital to ensuring its widespread acceptance by the majority of the population.

    Stage II – Challenging the Church of England

    Unsatisfied by their efforts to effect further reforms, certain Puritan extremists turned away from the Anglican Church itself, seeking an alternative to the rigid hierarchy of the Erastian structure which entailed royal dominion in the field of religion. This emerged as early as 1567, in the aftermath of the Vestiarian Controversy, when Grindal uncovered a London Separatist sect, the Family of Love. John Field’s ban from preaching in 1572 after failing to subscribe unconditionally to the 39 Articles and the Prayer Book made him a champion of Presbyterianism, co-authoring the Admonitions to Parliament in 1572 which Wilcox and Cartwright. The movement gathered steam after Grindal’s suspension in 1577 for refusing to suppress prophesyings, as this was taken by some to be indicative of the hopelessness of fighting the conservative impulses within the Church.

    The Presbyterian Movement was twofold, in and out of Parliament. In the House of Commons, the ‘bill and book’ campaign aimed to abolish the royal supremacy and establish a radically Protestant, Presbyterian Church. Bills to this effect were introduced by Turner and Cope in 1584 and 1587 respectively. Concurrently, Field et al took advantage of Grindal’s suspension, and the consequent limitations upon the Church’s authority, to set up the Classical Movement, a grassroots Presbyterian framework which held its first national synod in London in 1582.

    Stage III – The Reduction of the Puritan Danger

    The growing tendency towards Protestant extremism provoked something of a conservative reaction among the authorities, exacerbated by the rise at court of the more conservative Christopher Hatton while Leicester’s star waned in light of his secret remarriage in 1578.

    Whitgift’s appointment as Archbishop of Canterbury in 1583 heralded the beginning of a crackdown on Puritan tendencies among the clergy. He implemented an ex officio oath, demanding that clergy subscribe to the Royal Supremacy, 39 Articles and Prayer Book and Ordinal: those who refused were deprived or banned from preaching. Some 300-400 became victims of this before an outcry forced him to restrict the tactic to new clergy.

    Puritanism was dealt a further blow by the deaths of its leading patrons in quick succession: Leicester passed away in 1588, followed by Mildmay in 1589 and Walsingham in 1590. Puritanism was further discredited by the scurrilous Martin Marprelate tracts, published in 1589, at a time when national unity was most essential due to the risk of Spanish invasion. At the height of the Gloriana Cult, after the defeat of the Armada, the minority of radicals were seen as dangerous subversives: a view confirmed by the sad Hacket affair of 1591, which allowed the Separatists to be portrayed as potential traitors.

    Ultimately, as the impetus of Parliamentary Puritanism failed, so did the grassroots tactics of Field, whose Classical Movement was dismantled by Bancroft in 1589. By the early 1590s, in the wake of punishing propaganda blows and the failure of various initiatives to establish any kind of foothold for radicals, Puritanism was effectively dead according to John Guy, and religion faded as a pivotal political issue. The Act Against Sectaries sealed the persecution of Separatists, and Morrice’s bills in 1593 failed quietly.
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    Does anyone know how to do spoiler tags on this board?
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    Two quick questions if anyone could answer please.

    What exactly was the patronage system? I don't get what it actually did?

    And also in an essay, do I refer to Cecil as William Cecil or Lord Burghley? Does it depend on the time span in which I'm writing my answer in? What if it's a question that is during Elizabeth's entire reign?

    Second question a bit trivial I know but was just wondering haha.

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by MalleusMaleficarum)
    Here's my condensed version of the Puritan threat to Elizabeth's church. It doesn't have all the facts, dates e.t.c. which you should have notes on, but this format makes the whole concept far easier to understand: looking at it in stages makes writing essays on the topic far easier (at least it did for me).

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    Does anyone know how to do spoiler tags on this board?
    Thanks you this has really helped simplify it for me

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