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How common is it for people to go their whole life without any mental illnesses?

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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Simply providing a quote does nothing to strengthen your argument.

    I do not accept that someone can be 'sick' mentally if their method of thought is not uncommon. Defining thoughts or actions that are not the norm as sick is the reason that people like homosexuals were thought for much of history to be ill or could be 'cured'.
    Parts of that are true but there is a large difference between having eccentric or uncommon thinking patterns and displaying behaviour and neurological symptoms that are a vast departure from any kind of reality.

    I bet if you walked onto a dementia unit in any hospital or care home the first word you'd use to describe the inhabitants would not be 'healthy.'
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    (Original post by MrHappy_J)
    So you're using homosexuality as an example of why you can't take mental illnesses seriously?

    People aren't diagnosed with a mental illness simply because the way they think is a little different to what is considered normal. Please go and do your research as you just sound ignorant.
    I'm using something that was for a period of history classes as a mental illness as an example.

    Homosexuals were thought to be mentally ill because they behaved in a way that was not thought of as acceptable or normal - however, it is not at all uncommon to be homosexual.

    My argument is that common behaviours or thought processes are simply reasonable deviations from the norm and not 'illnesses'.

    I do not at all seek to propose that all things regarded as mental illnesses are not mental illnesses - I merely believe that not all things currently classified as mental illnesses can reasonably be viewed as a mental illness.
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    (Original post by Enigma.)
    Parts of that are true but there is a large difference between having eccentric or uncommon thinking patterns and displaying behaviour and neurological symptoms that are a vast departure from any kind of reality.

    I bet if you walked onto a dementia unit in any hospital or care home the first word you'd use to describe the inhabitants would not be 'healthy.'
    If you'll read my last post, you'll note that I do not propose to say that all things thought of as mental illnesses are not mental illnesses.
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    (Original post by MrHappy_J)
    1 in 4 people isn't "most people".
    1 in 4 is over the course of any year. That does not mean the same 1 in 4 experience it year after year.

    Over 75 years all 4 of those original 4 could have a form of depression.

    Probability says they will have it multiple times.
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    I've counted 12 people (including me) in this thread. I wonder which 3 of us is gonna have a mental illness this year? Probably most of us given the time we spend on TSR, and the time at which we are posting.
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    (Original post by NYU2012)
    Do you not understand that psychologists actually conduct research on these things? It's not like they sit there and go "Oohoh!!! This sounds like a good mental illness to make up!!!"

    They monitor where your attention is currently focused; they monitor what you're eyes are currently focused on; they measure your brain activity; they see what parts of the brain are active and how active they are.

    ADHD is well documented and researched; people who suffer from ADHD can actually be monitored, using research techniques, and you can see that they actually have ADHD and how ADHD affects the brain.
    My point is that 'different' doesn't necessarily mean 'mentally ill'.

    I can appreciate that something can be observably different from an observed norm, but that does not, to my mind, automatically mean that it is an illness. It is just a deviation.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    I'm using something that was for a period of history classes as a mental illness as an example.

    Homosexuals were thought to be mentally ill because they behaved in a way that was not thought of as acceptable or normal - however, it is not at all uncommon to be homosexual.

    My argument is that common behaviours or thought processes are simply reasonable deviations from the norm and not 'illnesses'.

    I do not at all seek to propose that all things regarded as mental illnesses are not mental illnesses - I merely believe that not all things currently classified as mental illnesses can reasonably be viewed as a mental illness.
    In order for something to be a mental illness is must cause psychological harm, distress or disfunction.

    Irregular thinking is not a mental illness -- if you want to use homosexuality as an example, it was previously thought that homosexuality was a disfunction which caused psychological harm and that's why it was a mental illness. However, research showed that that was not true -- ergo, they removed homosexuality from the list of mental disorders.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    If you'll read my last post, you'll note that I do not propose to say that all things thought of as mental illnesses are not mental illnesses.
    What research have you done in this area? Peer reviewed journal articles will be fine thanks. Do you have any qualifications in psychology?
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    I'm using something that was for a period of history classes as a mental illness as an example.

    Homosexuals were thought to be mentally ill because they behaved in a way that was not thought of as acceptable or normal - however, it is not at all uncommon to be homosexual.

    My argument is that common behaviours or thought processes are simply reasonable deviations from the norm and not 'illnesses'.

    I do not at all seek to propose that all things regarded as mental illnesses are not mental illnesses - I merely believe that not all things currently classified as mental illnesses can reasonably be viewed as a mental illness.
    On what grounds? You are saying that our understanding of mental illness is purely based on the level of deviation of a normal behaviour which is in reality extremely difficult to define.

    If something is classified as a mental illness in the UK it is because there is peer reviewed and medically assessed evidence of neurological symptom manifestation.

    We don't just 'say' somebody is mentally ill.

    That's not how medicine works.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    My point is that 'different' doesn't necessarily mean 'mentally ill'.

    I can appreciate that something can be observably different from an observed norm, but that does not, to my mind, automatically mean that it is an illness. It is just a deviation.
    No one is saying that 'different' from the norm makes something a mental illness -- psychologists are not saying different is an illness.

    Only things which cause harm, distress or disfunction are mental disorders.
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    (Original post by NYU2012)
    In order for something to be a mental illness is must cause psychological harm, distress or disfunction.

    Irregular thinking is not a mental illness -- if you want to use homosexuality as an example, it was previously thought that homosexuality was a disfunction which caused psychological harm and that's why it was a mental illness. However, research showed that that was not true -- ergo, they removed homosexuality from the list of mental disorders.
    That seems to be a very broad scope. What measure of harm, distress or disfunction is sufficient?
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    (Original post by blu tack)
    What research have you done in this area? Peer reviewed journal articles will be fine thanks. Do you have any qualifications in psychology?
    Of course not, I'm doing something useful with my time.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    That seems to be a very broad scope. What measure of harm, distress or disfunction is sufficient?
    That's determined by a group of experts in the field, which consult a plethora of research and have spent years in the field.

    For example, the DSM-IV and soon the DSM-V, are assembled by a huge group of psychologists who cover thousands of research papers in an attempt to best categorize mental disorders and their symptoms.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    How common is it for people to go their whole life without any mental illnesses?
    You never got stressed? Who are you, a prince? :rolleyes:
    Please.
    Every single person in this goddam planet gets at least one mental illness in their lives. Count yourself lucky naive.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Of course not, I'm doing something useful with my time.
    Don't pretend that psychology isn't useful.

    You're a law student -- you should know better.

    Especially as a law student you should be very familiar with forensic psychology; and should have a sufficient working knowledge of social psychology.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Of course not, I'm doing something useful with my time.
    Was that a shot at psychology?

    And useful with your time? You are arguing with people online at 4 am.

    :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Of course not, I'm doing something useful with my time.
    Claiming you know better than the experts, on the back of no research whatsoever, in a mental health forum is a good use of your time? I'm not overly surprised you have nothing to back your opinions up tbh.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    I'm using something that was for a period of history classes as a mental illness as an example.

    Homosexuals were thought to be mentally ill because they behaved in a way that was not thought of as acceptable or normal - however, it is not at all uncommon to be homosexual.

    My argument is that common behaviours or thought processes are simply reasonable deviations from the norm and not 'illnesses'.

    I do not at all seek to propose that all things regarded as mental illnesses are not mental illnesses - I merely believe that not all things currently classified as mental illnesses can reasonably be viewed as a mental illness.
    on what grounds do you say this? are you a qualified psychologist? have you done any research in this area?
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Of course not, I'm doing something useful with my time.
    For the record I have no feelings towards psychology. Im a med student.

    But to publicly slate a well established academic field on an internet forum, because you don't believe that mental illness actually exists where science disagrees, is just childish.
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    (Original post by Enigma.)
    1 in 4 is over the course of any year. That does not mean the same 1 in 4 experience it year after year.

    Over 75 years all 4 of those original 4 could have a form of depression.

    Probability says they will have it multiple times.
    I heard it's 1 in 4 people over the course of their lives...not every single person will suffer from mental illness.

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