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Volunteering abroad is condenscending and patronising to other races

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    (Original post by Zeffy)
    1) But it isn't good, I've proved that. Do you really not agree that it wouldn't be better for the African countries to be self-standing rather than relying on volunteers from abroad. Would it not be better for African labourers to make a living building rather than having a college kid do it for free? Or wouldn't it be better to, instead of an unqualified schmuck paying good money to go over to paint a wall to instead use the money to provide needed medical equipment and tools for the locals to use?


    2) The postion isn't needed and most of them do believe they are superior. Even if they don't admit it they have an arrogant belief that African, Asian and South American countries need their help. That is arrogant and insulting. You only have to look at the words used by the volunteer types to describe the people they are "helping" to see that this is the case.
    The point is that the areas in which volunteering labourers are being used are largely areas that CANNOT afford paid labourers. Also, in the cases I've come across, the volunteers are trained and expected to give the same training to the locals so that they CAN then use those skills to better their community without the need of more volunteers.

    I'm sure that there are plenty of people who arrogantly believe that, but there is also a large number of volunteers who are genuinely aiming to better the conditions of an area by building a well etc. On the other hand, there are also people who volunteer in order to gain experience, much like work experience or interning in the uk. And they are only given positions once the paid positions are full.
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    I agree that volunteering abroad is uber-middle class, and the people who I know I've done all said that it 'changed their lives', which just illustrates what a sheltered life they lead to experience a month of something that millions of people go through every day.

    Personally, I can't afford flights to go thousands of miles away, so I'm volunteering to help refugees and the homeless in my own country. It won't be as glamorous as the pictures that OP mentioned, but it'll still achieve the goal of helping people less fortunate that myself and my skills will be more needed since I am a resident here, so I understand the language and culture better than the people I'm helping.
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    (Original post by Deema)
    All the generalisations I made in the post are in reply to the op's generalisations, not addressing all forms of volunteering. I agree with things like painting walls and all that nonsense, but as far as I am aware, things like building schools and wells are things which the volunteers I have come across are given training in, which they then transfer onto the community they volunteer within, so that they in turn can use those skills. These are programs which the governments of these developmental countries set up and require volunteers for. India for instance need these volunteers to create more sustainable and hygienic living conditions for those in shanty towns, or rather train their inhabitants according to the governmental methods- this is just an example.

    As for places like Fiji, I have personal experience as to how this works. People who volunteer in these situations are NOT doing it to help people in poverty, because they aren't. They're doing it to gain experience and references, much like work experience or interning. This does not put others out of jobs, as qualified and willing applicants are given priority. I volunteered in Syria at a summer school. It was full of rich upper class Syrian children, but because of the stuff that's been going on for over a year now, those who can afford it have left the country, so there was space for me to take on a class. I ended up receiving training throughout my stay and as well as teaching a class (3-6 year olds) I was assigned to all the grunt work. It's NOT because it's a poverty stricken country and THEY need me, it's because I am a lowly student with no experience in working and I needed THEM.

    Although I do agree with you on the aspect of childcare in orphanages and such. They should have 9 month contracts or something if you're going to be in contact with the children. I hope this reply isn't too muddled, I'm very tired... Oh and as for the hipster comment, I wasn't implying that he is the ONLY one of this view, merely that the way in which his argument was put forward implied that he was against volunteering for the sake of nonconformity, much like a hipster.
    Thanks for your explanation. I think we are largely in agreement. However, I just want to make clear that I am not really referring to sustainable, government-sponsored projects but rather the purely commercial adventure volunteering ventures created by companies such as STA and the like. I would expect a project sponsored by the Indian government to be worthwhile. As for the Fijian teacher example, we'll have to agree to disagree whether it puts locals out of work- even if you are right then I would still question what value a British person could bring to the table when they have next-to-no knowledge of pedagogy or local culture. I also imagine such a situation (constant change of teachers on short placements) is hardly good for the childrens' education. As for voluntourists 'needing' to volunteer abroad for experience, that's just nonsense. In the eyes of employers, volunteering in the UK is just as valuable for demonstrating skills and aptitudes as taking an exotic adventure holiday. Furthermore, there are plenty of paid English teaching positions available (I got my experience by volunteering in the UK with vulnerable adults and then going to teach on a local wage in a genuinely poverty-stricken Asian country...quite a step 'down' from Syria but I still got paid a fair local rate- and obtained the minimal qualifications beforehand).

    As an employer, I would always favour a year spent volunteering in a care home or with disabled children/the Samaritans/conservation work in the UK to a two week stint 'teaching' in Ghana.

    Additionally, I think part of the OP's grudge is with voluntourists who go for the experience/CV enhancement but act as if they believe they are saving the world. I have more respect for those who know what they are doing and accept it is largely for their benefit but who make the best of things while there without any ridiculous belief that they are the new Mother Theresa.
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    (Original post by standreams)
    Additionally, I think part of the OP's grudge is with voluntourists who go for the experience/CV enhancement but act as if they believe they are saving the world. I have more respect for those who know what they are doing and accept it is largely for their benefit but who make the best of things while there without any ridiculous belief that they are the new Mother Theresa.
    Yeah I totally agree with this.

    I'm not sure I agree with the thread starter completely, but I certainly agree that volunteering has become very commercialised, especially 'gap yah' students going off to build a schools in Africa, etc. There are lots of apparent not for profit organisations out there that sell the volunteering experience as though it's part of the tourist industry. There's almost this attitude of 'pay us lots of money to come cuddle these cute, deprived children' - it objectifies and stereotypes the very people that the volunteers are supposed to be helping. I dislike the aggressive marketing of these 'charities' as well because the motivation for volunteering should come from yourself, not from a brochure.

    A few of my friends have volunteered through organisations like this, and I do agree that the main reason that they did it was so that they could post photos of themselves hugging black kids on the internet and boost their CV. They have not kept in contact with any of the people they met while they were volunteering, and they have no plans to return to help some more. I also agree that Western culture tends to have a very one dimensional and condescending view of 'underdeveloped' countries, and this persistent idea that they need fixing. There are problems all over the world and there are people in need everywhere, including in our own societies. I respect people who find the time to volunteer in their own countries, it is a much better use of resources. Where would we be without the St. John's ambulance volunteers?

    I think the thing which is annoying people about the gap yah generation, is that a lot of these people who volunteer abroad are not the kind of people who would help their local community in the same way, and so there is something quite hypocritical about it. It's like the people who go on these trips are paying to pretend to be somebody they are not.

    As other posters have pointed out, it makes a lot more sense if skilled people like doctors can give up some of their time to volunteer abroad in places where there is a urgent need for their skills. Thanks to globalisation, boarders are becoming less important. It is great that we are more interconnected, and that people are generally more open-minded to other cultures because of it. If a young person can go abroad and meet people from different backgrounds and become more open-minded, that is a good thing.

    It would be nice to think we live in a world where we can share resources, and help those most in need regardless of location or nationality. Realistically though, a lot of international aid ends up perpetuating the existing problems and increasing inequality. Aid/volunteering is not really a sustainable solution, it usually makes those receiving it dependent on it. I think really people just need to be consistent in their actions. Don't pretend you want to help eradicate poverty and hardship by doing a volunteering stint abroad, but then come home and forget about helping others, and return to your self-centred, money/consumer driven lives.
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    (Original post by Arekkusu)
    You are completely right! Obviously it might be a bit different volunteering long term but popping over for a few weeks and painting a wall, it's a wonder they don't kill you in your sleep. And I've been on one of these things so think before you neg
    :lol:

    I totally agree with the OP. It is pretty patronising for a group of middle-class, British 17-18 year olds to go to an African/Asian country and act as if they're able to make more of a difference by making ropey glorified tents or by 'teaching' classes of 10 year olds. If they tried that on here, they'd be laughed out of the room, but because the people are brown, they obviously 'need our help'.
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    (Original post by Zeffy)
    No it's not. I am intelligent. I am enlightened. In fact, I'd go so far to say I'm one of the most intelligent posters here.

    I, unlike most of the braindead, clueless sheep such as yourself have the mental ability to make my own decisions in life rather than following the crowd and doing what everybody else does. As proven by the fact that nobody has an intelligent argument against my point that volunteering is condenscending and insulting to other races and, that the white, middle-class volunteers who go on the projects have a deep-seated sense of superiority that I, as an enlightened individual, do not have.
    "I, unlike most of the braindead, clueless sheep such as yourself"-me??:confused:
    If you are so enlightened and blah blah blah you would not call me brain dead and a clueless sheep because first of all you don't know me and second of all isn't it kind of obvious to you"an intelligent person"*cough* that I am a human?I am typing this comment with my fingers after all.And now you might reply and say oh well the clueless sheep was not meant to be literally taken.Guess what? I don't care.Believing your superior to me or anyone else on TSR or in real live does not make you superior.Just face it,please!
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    (Original post by Zeffy)
    I however am an intelligent, enlightened individual and I realise that volunteering abroad does not help and is insulting to the people of the other country. Plus I, unlike other posters here, don't have a belief that I am superior to the "poor, uneducated, underpriveledged" people living in Indian or Africa.

    (Original post by Zeffy)
    No it's not. I am intelligent. I am enlightened. In fact, I'd go so far to say I'm one of the most intelligent posters here.

    I, unlike most of the braindead, clueless sheep such as yourself have the mental ability to make my own decisions in life rather than following the crowd and doing what everybody else does. As proven by the fact that nobody has an intelligent argument against my point that volunteering is condenscending and insulting to other races and, that the white, middle-class volunteers who go on the projects have a deep-seated sense of superiority that I, as an enlightened individual, do not have.
    I can see that you definitely don't have a deep-seated sense of superiority, or any sort of arrogance.
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    Yerh god damn them doctors without borders volunteers. Going over to foreign countries and treating the sick who can't afford to do so themselves.

    I'm sure that their hubris is such that they'd much rather die than accept help from such condescending types like that.
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    I totally agree with the OP. White middle-class western students have fooled themselves into believing that they're really 'making a difference' when in actual fact they partake in such trips to a) beef up their CV, and b) demonstrate to their peers how caring and moral they are by helping those 'poor' 'needy' Africans. In other words the whole exercise is self serving as they're just using African poverty as a vehicle to make themselves look good.
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    lol @ you thinking you can speak for these people? you do not know ANYTHING about how they feel. no i have not done this volunteering thing but i think you are the worst one in this situation. why are you so arrogant as to think you can speak on the behalf of people who are in a completely different situation to you? an unimaginable situation?


    no you do not know that if you were a builder in africa you would be insulted. i think if anything it's insulting that you feel you have the right to speak on their behalf. but you carry on, feeling superior yourself, above these "silly middle class teenagers" who are at least helping people in some way. how about you start concentrating on your own life rather than what others do around you. if you want to help other people, then do, however there's no need to get all poncy about how other people choose to help others too.

    no, they do not think ethnic groups cannot survive without their help. help being the operative word. i can survive without my parents cooking me dinner, and often do, but it is a major help when they cook instead of me. then i can get on with other things that can be done. it's the same principle (though obviously in a very different situation). it's one less thing they have to take care of, there are other things (possibly more important things) that they can do. no one is saying that they are changing the lives of these people, that they are simply giving them a bit of help. if they didn't want it then they wouldn't accept it, simple as. no one is forcing them to let these kids help them. they also bring in a bit of money too, for the area. these people have to eat, buy stuff... middle class kids are stonking rich compared to the people they are staying with... although it is insulting to give them money/old clothes (so they are advised not to)... it certainly helps if they buy some of their goods, go shopping at the local market. it is also a nice experience for the children of the village... you become a bit of a museum exhibit for most of them and they like to play with you etc.


    as for your comment "Volunteering efforts should be spent in better training workers in said countries to earn a living teaching or building"... newsflash, this does go on! however i hardly think middle class teens are suitable for teaching these things! if they want to help actively and see the people they are helping/experience their culture then helping on building projects is pretty much the only way they can! it's better than nothing. they are not dong it at a detriment to the teaching efforts that are going on out there. it's also hard to actually get people who ARE knowledgable/qualified to teach these things to go out there and help.

    this post makes you come across as a major dick... just saying... ESPECIALLY the last paragragh. get off your high horse!
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    Whilst to an large extent I agree with the whole young people volunteering (i.e. going on holiday and augmenting their CVs) generally being ridiculous, and not done for any 'noble' reasons or to the benefit of those they're apparently helping...


    The OP is a ****ing ****.



    (Original post by Bellissima)
    i can survive without my parents cooking me dinner, and often do, but it is a major help when they cook instead of me. then i can get on with other things that can be done.

    What a terrible example.
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    Well, my opinion differs! I do think that your volunteer experience and the difference you will make depend largely on the organization you chose for your trip. I myself am going to Africa this summer and my firm belief is that what I will be doing there is a good thing. The orphanage I will spend a month working for is in a genuine need of teachers and people who can take care of the orphans, many of which in fragile ages between 2-8 years.
    I can see a trend here - most of you categorize Western 18-year-olds but please, don't! I had the (mis)fortune of growing up in a country on the very border dividing the Western and Eastern "worlds" and I know how the little things in life can make a huge difference to a needy person, regardless of age, gender or origin.
    I do recognize the commercial side of it, how many organizations keep the money for themselves and all that but I carefully chose the people I am giving my money to - the fees I paid will go to the local host family I will be staying with.
    I am about to devote my career to the developing countries as I am aiming for Tropical Medicine. Yes, it's a ****-**** world out there but you know what - good things are done everyday! It hasn't even crossed my mind to try and change the way people in these countries live but rather improve it. Their values and morale are still there - in society - while our Western life is one of decadence and hypocrisy. I'm trying to run away from it. It's all down to personal opinion and the choices we make in life. :^_^: excuses if I sound hostile or rude, not my intention
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    (Original post by concubine)



    What a terrible example.
    not really, like i said it's a very different situation obviously but it's the same principle.
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    (Original post by Bellissima)
    lol @ you thinking you can speak for these people? you do not know ANYTHING about how they feel. no i have not done this volunteering thing but i think you are the worst one in this situation. why are you so arrogant as to think you can speak on the behalf of people who are in a completely different situation to you? an unimaginable situation?
    I think you missed the entire point of this thread. The OP may not be able to speak on their behalf (though I know people on this thread, including myself, have shown that their are people who believe that volunteering is arrogant and condescending with some examples of Africans agreeing with this), but neither can you - the bit I highlighted shows that indefinitely. He's not arrogant, he's merely voicing his opinion on what he thinks - YOU are arrogant for assuming you know what the situation the Africans are in.


    no you do not know that if you were a builder in africa you would be insulted. i think if anything it's insulting that you feel you have the right to speak on their behalf. but you carry on, feeling superior yourself, above these "silly middle class teenagers" who are at least helping people in some way. how about you start concentrating on your own life rather than what others do around you. if you want to help other people, then do, however there's no need to get all poncy about how other people choose to help others too.
    Again, you missed the point of the thread and keep on disregarding what you are implying you have knowledge of volunteering/with African opinion on this matter yet you have provided no evidence for it and you only confirmed you don't when you said 'no I have not done volunteering'.

    no, they do not think ethnic groups cannot survive without their help. help being the operative word. i can survive without my parents cooking me dinner, and often do, but it is a major help when they cook instead of me. then i can get on with other things that can be done. it's the same principle (though obviously in a very different situation). it's one less thing they have to take care of, there are other things (possibly more important things) that they can do. no one is saying that they are changing the lives of these people, that they are simply giving them a bit of help. if they didn't want it then they wouldn't accept it, simple as. no one is forcing them to let these kids help them. they also bring in a bit of money too, for the area. these people have to eat, buy stuff... middle class kids are stonking rich compared to the people they are staying with... although it is insulting to give them money/old clothes (so they are advised not to)... it certainly helps if they buy some of their goods, go shopping at the local market. it is also a nice experience for the children of the village... you become a bit of a museum exhibit for most of them and they like to play with you etc.
    You shouldn't compare our relationship to the people of those countries as being children and us as parents - THAT is arrogant, and THAT assumes you know better.

    If they want help then I'd happily give them it and would never patronise them for their situation, but if they don't want it then I won't force volunteering onto them - I cannot say that you would do the same as you've implied you would want to help them even if they refused.


    as for your comment "Volunteering efforts should be spent in better training workers in said countries to earn a living teaching or building"... newsflash, this does go on! however i hardly think middle class teens are suitable for teaching these things! if they want to help actively and see the people they are helping/experience their culture then helping on building projects is pretty much the only way they can! it's better than nothing. they are not dong it at a detriment to the teaching efforts that are going on out there. it's also hard to actually get people who ARE knowledgable/qualified to teach these things to go out there and help.
    All of your post seems to have some sort of resentment to middle-class people. Maybe it didn't occur to you but poor class people volunteer in countries too - infact my school did so with a school in Malawai, with three quarters of the volunteers being of poor/lower class backgrounds. And so what if they are middle-class people? Does that make them any less likely to help the native peoples? No it doesn't.

    this post makes you come across as a major dick... just saying... ESPECIALLY the last paragragh. get off your high horse!
    That can very easily be applied to you and your response.
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    (Original post by Kiss)
    I think you missed the entire point of this thread. The OP may not be able to speak on their behalf (though I know people on this thread, including myself, have shown that their are people who believe that volunteering is arrogant and condescending with some examples of Africans agreeing with this), but neither can you - the bit I highlighted shows that indefinitely. He's not arrogant, he's merely voicing his opinion on what he thinks - YOU are arrogant for assuming you know what the situation the Africans are in.
    i am not trying to speak on their behalf though, not do i "assume" what situation "the africans" are in (they are not one collective group in one situation)... i am simply saying how they CAN help.

    and i think the last paragraph shows his arrogance.




    (Original post by Kiss)
    Again, you missed the point of the thread and keep on disregarding what you are implying you have knowledge of volunteering/with African opinion on this matter yet you have provided no evidence for it and you only confirmed you don't when you said 'no I have not done volunteering'.
    i have not volunteered in africa but i have friends (therefore spoken to people) who have and i also have a family friend who is heavily involved in these projects (spends half her year between here and malawi) who i obviously speak to.. and i have also spent a few days with a family in an indian village where these kind of projects go on and they were talking very favourably/happily about these kids who came to help build a clean water system and paint the local school a few weeks before i arrived... so very similar to those projects in africa. they weren't just happy about the fact they helped they were very happy they had come and they had both been able to learn more about eachother etc. and interact. you don't have to actively take part in the volunteering thing to have an opinion on it.



    (Original post by Kiss)
    You shouldn't compare our relationship to the people of those countries as being children and us as parents - THAT is arrogant, and THAT assumes you know better.
    not really, it doesn't have to be parents, it could be ANYONE... my neighbour, a friend... some random stranger... it would still be equally helpful. i'm not seeing the connection with that and me assuming i know better though?

    (Original post by Kiss)
    If they want help then I'd happily give them it and would never patronise them for their situation, but if they don't want it then I won't force volunteering onto them - I cannot say that you would do the same as you've implied you would want to help them even if they refused.
    umm... ok you sound a bit mad now... i have no idea where you're getting any of this from. i never said anything about forcing myself on them.

    the volunteering is at their discretion. if they did not want it they would not get involved with the programs and they would not welcome the volunteer groups into their community with friendliness and happiness.




    (Original post by Kiss)
    All of your post seems to have some sort of resentment to middle-class people. Maybe it didn't occur to you but poor class people volunteer in countries too - infact my school did so with a school in Malawai, with three quarters of the volunteers being of poor/lower class backgrounds. And so what if they are middle-class people? Does that make them any less likely to help the native peoples? No it doesn't.
    no it doesn't... i was reflecting OPs statement of how it is mainly middle class (which it is) kids who do it and how he seemed to regard them... i am middle class myself . class has nothing to do with it, it just so happens it's mainly middle class and above who do this kind of this because it is easier for them to afford it.
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    wiow. can people not be capable of just trying to do something nice to help out fellow human beings that live in a ****ty country anymore?

    I know people love any excuse to have a whinge but I never expected to hear someone having a moan about people attempting to help the third world. jesus ****ing christ. It clearly needs all the help it can get.
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    What a load of narcacisstic claptrap.
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    (Original post by IvetBelqta)
    Well, my opinion differs! I do think that your volunteer experience and the difference you will make depend largely on the organization you chose for your trip. I myself am going to Africa this summer and my firm belief is that what I will be doing there is a good thing. The orphanage I will spend a month working for is in a genuine need of teachers and people who can take care of the orphans, many of which in fragile ages between 2-8 years.
    I can see a trend here - most of you categorize Western 18-year-olds but please, don't! I had the (mis)fortune of growing up in a country on the very border dividing the Western and Eastern "worlds" and I know how the little things in life can make a huge difference to a needy person, regardless of age, gender or origin.
    I do recognize the commercial side of it, how many organizations keep the money for themselves and all that but I carefully chose the people I am giving my money to - the fees I paid will go to the local host family I will be staying with.
    I am about to devote my career to the developing countries as I am aiming for Tropical Medicine. Yes, it's a ****-**** world out there but you know what - good things are done everyday! It hasn't even crossed my mind to try and change the way people in these countries live but rather improve it. Their values and morale are still there - in society - while our Western life is one of decadence and hypocrisy. I'm trying to run away from it. It's all down to personal opinion and the choices we make in life. :^_^: excuses if I sound hostile or rude, not my intention
    I don't deny your good intentions and I'm sure that, with a devoted and conscientious attitude, you will do some good during your stay. So please don't take this as criticism- but have you considered the possible impact in terms of attachment issues that might be caused to young children (at a very fragile age) of having a new 'carer' arrive only to leave one month later? Or to have a constant stream of teachers, each one lasting only for the same short period?

    Short-term volunteering with young children is often seen as quite a detrimental thing. Whether it is the lesser of two evils (short term volunteering vs no volunteering at all) is a matter for debate.

    I'm not saying 'don't go' as you know far more about your placement than I do, but I hope you can consider both sides of the argument- and then use that awareness to ensure that you make only a positive impact on the community.
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    (Original post by Carecup)
    Yerh god damn them doctors without borders volunteers. Going over to foreign countries and treating the sick who can't afford to do so themselves.

    I'm sure that their hubris is such that they'd much rather die than accept help from such condescending types like that.

    Shame that Doctor's without borders are actually trained professionals rather than some uppity, disrespectful, 18 year old kid with no training or qualifications which renders your point mute.





    (Original post by IvetBelqta)
    Well, my opinion differs! I do think that your volunteer experience and the difference you will make depend largely on the organization you chose for your trip. I myself am going to Africa this summer and my firm belief is that what I will be doing there is a good thing. The orphanage I will spend a month working for is in a genuine need of teachers and people who can take care of the orphans, many of which in fragile ages between 2-8 years.
    I can see a trend here - most of you categorize Western 18-year-olds but please, don't! I had the (mis)fortune of growing up in a country on the very border dividing the Western and Eastern "worlds" and I know how the little things in life can make a huge difference to a needy person, regardless of age, gender or origin.
    I do recognize the commercial side of it, how many organizations keep the money for themselves and all that but I carefully chose the people I am giving my money to - the fees I paid will go to the local host family I will be staying with.
    I am about to devote my career to the developing countries as I am aiming for Tropical Medicine. Yes, it's a ****-**** world out there but you know what - good things are done everyday! It hasn't even crossed my mind to try and change the way people in these countries live but rather improve it. Their values and morale are still there - in society - while our Western life is one of decadence and hypocrisy. I'm trying to run away from it. It's all down to personal opinion and the choices we make in life. :^_^: excuses if I sound hostile or rude, not my intention
    I sense a lot of anger, is it because you realise that I am correct?

    Haven't you concerned the psychosocial effects that you going to the orphanage for a short period may have on the children, or considered that the constant volunteers heading to such orphanages may in turn lead to a culture where parents, rather than look after their offspring themselves, instead ship their children off to the local orphanage/foster home because they know there will be a constant stream of wet-behind-the-ears college students coming to the country to do the job.


    (Original post by SnoochToTheBooch)
    wiow. can people not be capable of just trying to do something nice to help out fellow human beings that live in a ****ty country anymore?

    I know people love any excuse to have a whinge but I never expected to hear someone having a moan about people attempting to help the third world. jesus ****ing christ. It clearly needs all the help it can get.
    A ****ty country, that's nice and arrogant of you. You've just proved my point of the arrogance of the middle-class, uneducated white boys such as yourself. You sneer and look down your nose at other cultures, incorrectly believing that they need the help from idiots such as yourself when that iis far from the case.

    The people living in these countries got on just fine before the rise of Voluntourism and the arrival of clueless, arrogant, sneering 18 year olds who arrived, pose for a photo with some children, have a game of football, paint a wall, look down their nose at everything and then head off home patting themselves on the back for making a difference.


    (Original post by Aust1n)
    What a load of narcacisstic claptrap.
    Thank you for your irrelevant input.

    I'm glad to see there are some who agree with me on this, and not everybody who posts here is a mindless, condescending drone unable to think for themselves who believes every other nation relies on the help of the big brave middle-class snob to get by.
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    (Original post by Zeffy)
    A ****ty country, that's nice and arrogant of you. You've just proved my point of the arrogance of the middle-class, uneducated white boys such as yourself. You sneer and look down your nose at other cultures, incorrectly believing that they need the help from idiots such as yourself when that iis far from the case.
    some things:

    - The third world is a ****ty place to live. That's not being arrogant, that's just stating a ****ing fact. Why not move there yourself if you think it's so great?

    - I don't feel superior for having been born and raised in the UK, just very lucky not to have been born into some war-torn, drought-stricken nightmare. It's got bugger all to do with culture. I've never done anything to help the third world either, but the thought of going over there myself to make some minor contribution sooner or later had crossed my mind, mostly through feeling guilty at living such a relatively priviliged life compared to the people over there - not for the reasons you claim everyone who does it would want to.

    - I don't consider myself a part of the so-called middle class, and I am far from uneducated.

    - If the third world doesn't need any help then how come there's an advert for some third world charity on the telly every 2 minutes?

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Updated: May 8, 2012
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