Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free to post

Help. I don't know what to do with my life.

Announcements Posted on
Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HeavyTeddy)
    That's quite sad. I would've thought people would want to find something they were well suited too before they actually committed to it.
    That's the reality of life my friend. Not everybody gets exactly what they want. There's more important things in life than your job anyway, you'll realize that as you get older.

    I hope you read my first post, that's the best advice you're going to get on this forum.
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smack)
    No, I never said that at all; that's a false dichotomy. What I said was that it is short sighted to consider solely what you'd enjoy the most at university and not to take career prospects into account. Most people simply cannot afford to go to university only to spend the next few years after they graduate on the dole only to get poor, low paying jobs after it.
    Well I meant it in the way that if it were a very difficult choice (and they were obviously not going to enjoy some subject choices), the next thing to do would be seeing which one you'd enjoy most. You can get to most places with a good degree after uni, so.
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HeavyTeddy)
    Ah well, I don't have horrible academics altogether, I just don't think they're good enough for Medicine. I got A*AABBBBBBBD in GCSE's but I'm on track for AAAB in my AS, so I'm doing quite well, just not on par with most medicine applicants (hence why I said horrible).

    Yes, I want the right balance, but I think everyone does. Most people have found exactly what career is perfectly suited to them and they can focus on it completely. I know I'm being specific, but I don't want to regret what I've done 10-20 years down the line because I can't find a job, or that I don't enjoy what I'm doing.
    It's not good enough for a magic circle firm, or other types of jobs you've described. You need to remember you can't get the right balance. You have to extremely hard for long hours in a high paying job and you have to work hard to get there in the first place.

    Stop being so picky about salary. What's the point of a high paying job if you don't even enjoy it? You're not likely to get it in the first place cos employers can see a lack of motivation for it in you.
    • Thread Starter
    • 6 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Indo-Chinese Food)
    you left out becoming an islamic scholar/ imam, as a muslim, surely thats as an impotant career line than any of the above?
    I don't need to mention that, as it's not something I'm considering. It's an obligation upon me to do so, so there isn't a doubt in my mind about striving to become a good muslim, at the very least.
    • Thread Starter
    • 6 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Inkerman)
    That's the reality of life my friend. Not everybody gets exactly what they want. There's more important things in life than your job anyway, you'll realize that as you get older.

    I hope you read my first post, that's the best advice you're going to get on this forum.
    Thanks. I'll take heed.
    • 22 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Frey)
    Well I meant it in the way that if it were a very difficult choice (and they were obviously not going to enjoy some subject choices), the next thing to do would be seeing which one you'd enjoy most. You can get to most places with a good degree after uni, so.
    You need the right degree for most positions. You're not going to become a pharmacist with a chemical engineering degree. You're not going to become a process engineer with a biochemistry degree.

    Now as I've said I'm not advocating doing something that you'd flat out not enjoy, but spending a few years at university doing a degree you don't enjoy that much is fine if it leads to a career that you do enjoy, or can at least stomach.
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smack)
    You need the right degree for most positions. You're not going to become a pharmacist with a chemical engineering degree. You're not going to become a process engineer with a biochemistry degree.

    Now as I've said I'm not advocating doing something that you'd flat out not enjoy, but spending a few years at university doing a degree you don't enjoy that much is fine if it leads to a career that you do enjoy, or can at least stomach.
    fair enough, I understand and well said.
    • Thread Starter
    • 6 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yothi5)
    It's not good enough for a magic circle firm, or other types of jobs you've described. You need to remember you can't get the right balance. You have to extremely hard for long hours in a high paying job and you have to work hard to get there in the first place.

    Stop being so picky about salary. What's the point of a high paying job if you don't even enjoy it? You're not likely to get it in the first place cos employers can see a lack of motivation for it in you.
    That's true, I suppose.Though, it's not as if I crave an outrageous lifestyle, I want a good salary so I can be in a financial state whereby I can take care of all my responsibilities (by good salary I mean around 40-50 thousand). At the same time, I'm going to be working in a specific area for the rest of my life and I don't want to be depressed because I dread what I'm doing.
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Try Marine biology . I heard its amazing!
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HeavyTeddy)
    I don't need to mention that, as it's not something I'm considering. It's an obligation upon me to do so, so there isn't a doubt in my mind about striving to become a good muslim, at the very least.
    muslims have told me that being a good muslims is doing what you can to extend your knowldge of islam. By that logic all muslim males should make the effort to become islamic scholars /imams

    studying biochem or even medicine you are doing the opposite becuase you will acitvley be studying concepts that isalm rejects ( genetics, evolution etc)

    so islam states its one or the other really...
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Frey)
    Well since you like science by the looks of it, but don't like maths too much, then why don't do biology? With something like biology, you'd get to do a broad range of subjects and find out what you really like, then specialise from there.

    Also, don't be too worried about getting a job.. pretty much NO ONE is getting a job just now, so what's important is finding something you enjoy and having a great time at uni!

    Get your hands so some prospectuses and look through the different courses the unis offer, so you can find the course you think you will most enjoy. If you are persistent and work hard, you'll get there with whatever you want to do.
    Silly little girl, you don't do a degree for the fun of it. Who pays 9k a year so they can do something they enjoy but know they can't get a job with. You do a degree so you can get a job. Silly SILLY little girl.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Frey)
    life's short, y'know
    I think she was being sarcastic.
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Theoneoranro)
    Silly little girl, you don't do a degree for the fun of it. Who pays 9k a year so they can do something they enjoy but know they can't get a job with. You do a degree so you can get a job. Silly SILLY little girl.
    yes. silly silly me. Let's all stone the silly girl for making such SILLY suggestions. :rolleyes:
    • 20 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HeavyTeddy)
    Hi guys,

    I've been tossing the idea around of what I want to do as a career for so long, but I'm just not able to stick with something long enough because there is always something that bothers me. It's either something the career entails that my belief goes against or future career prospects that normally puts me off something.

    In the past year I've considered:
    Law (magic circle and city)- Worried that my social life will be consumed and I'll get way too greedy with that amount of money. Mainly, it's just not what I'm interested in.
    Medicine- There is better salary and career prospects, but it just isn't realistic (due to horrible GCSE's and lack of work exp and voluntary work).
    Biochemistry- Scared I won't be able to get a job afterwards to support my mum and family. Not sure it's what I want to do.
    Chemistry- put off by inorganic chemistry and the amount of maths.
    Chemical Engineering-put off by maths.
    Pharmacy- I feel working as a pharmacist will just bore me to death.
    Pharmacology- Testing on animals is not something I want to get involved in.

    I just want something that's cutting-edge, challenging and stimulating. Something that will allow the right balance of a good salary, decent working hours and satisfaction. Something that I will be able to get a good, secure job with. I tend to like forensics but I'm completely put off by it due to the salary and prospects. I also really interested in pathology and medical research.

    So, is there anything that you think I might be interested in? I've looked everywhere but I can't find anything that I like and can put my mind too. I'm going to be applying to university for 2013 entry, and I'm really confused right now.

    Please help, anything is appreciated.

    Thanks
    Have you spoken to a careers' adviser? Or done any work experience in the things you've mentioned you may be interested in?
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Optometry?
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Theoneoranro)
    Silly little girl, you don't do a degree for the fun of it. Who pays 9k a year so they can do something they enjoy but know they can't get a job with. You do a degree so you can get a job. Silly SILLY little girl.
    (Original post by Frey)
    yes. silly silly me. Let's all stone the silly girl for making such SILLY suggestions. :rolleyes:
    @Theoneoranro: I think you're being a bit harsh there.

    If you have a specific career goal in mind - engineer, doctor, nurse etc., then it clearly makes sense to apply for a specific 'vocational' degree. Similarly, if you're very interested in a career in a certain area, then there might be a broad set of subjects which you would tend to choose from.

    However, the majority of 18 year olds don't have a firm idea of what career they would like - many have no idea at all. In these circumstances, most people opt to do a degree they are interested in. If you are not going to be entering a career which requires a specific degree, then the most important considerations in terms of employment are to get a qualification which is reasonably well-respected, and to achieve at least a 2:1. Since your chances of getting a 2:1 are presumably dramatically increased if you enjoy what you are studying, it makes sense to at least make that a part of your decision.

    On a more philosophical note: While it's good to plan ahead to some extent, we have to live in the moment as well. Your time at university is precious, to be enjoyed in its own right rather than to be seen just as preparation and training for the rest of your life. If you spend your life thinking - 'I'll just do this thing I hate for three years and then everything will be great afterwards', life may end up being quite a disappointment.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Inkerman)
    On the flipside you have to deal with cancer patients on a daily basis. That's not something I personally think that I could handle or want to handle psychologically.
    Not necessarily so. If you become a diagnostic radiographer, you may be in contact with hardly any cancer patients. This depends on what area you choose to specialize in.

    Your referring only to THERAPEUTIC RADIOGRAPHERS with that comment!
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mbob)
    @Theoneoranro: I think you're being a bit harsh there.

    If you have a specific career goal in mind - engineer, doctor, nurse etc., then it clearly makes sense to apply for a specific 'vocational' degree. Similarly, if you're very interested in a career in a certain area, then there might be a broad set of subjects which you would tend to choose from.

    However, the majority of 18 year olds don't have a firm idea of what career they would like - many have no idea at all. In these circumstances, most people opt to do a degree they are interested in. If you are not going to be entering a career which requires a specific degree, then the most important considerations in terms of employment are to get a qualification which is reasonably well-respected, and to achieve at least a 2:1. Since your chances of getting a 2:1 are presumably dramatically increased if you enjoy what you are studying, it makes sense to at least make that a part of your decision.

    On a more philosophical note: While it's good to plan ahead to some extent, we have to live in the moment as well. Your time at university is precious, to be enjoyed in its own right rather than to be seen just as preparation and training for the rest of your life. If you spend your life thinking - 'I'll just do this thing I hate for three years and then everything will be great afterwards', life may end up being quite a disappointment.
    Well Said! Just about the only sense I've read in this post!

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: May 17, 2012
New on TSR

Personal statement help

Use our clever tool to create a PS you're proud of.

Article updates
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.