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A/A* students, What's your secret?

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    (Original post by OwenFerny)
    It's a good idea to have goals, i.e. 'I want to go to Oxford, so I need to work very hard to get those grades or I will not make it.' Motivational videos are quite good too, I find this one particularly inspiring: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5fsm-...eature=related Get motivated. It won't seem like a chore to revise because its all leading towards something. Good luck.

    Note: I got Bs at GCSE, then AAB at A level, mainly because I had motivation to do well.
    Tell me why I did not know about this video months before my exams

    That video is THE cure for procrastination! My goodness!

    Thank you!
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    (Original post by OwenFerny)
    It's a good idea to have goals, i.e. 'I want to go to Oxford, so I need to work very hard to get those grades or I will not make it.' Motivational videos are quite good too, I find this one particularly inspiring: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5fsm-...eature=related Get motivated. It won't seem like a chore to revise because its all leading towards something. Good luck.

    Note: I got Bs at GCSE, then AAB at A level, mainly because I had motivation to do well.
    WOW that video was truly inspirational. This is the best reply so far. Because of you I actually think I can get the best. I think everyone should look at this video. I can guarantee it will give them a whole lot of confidence and they'll do they're best
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    (Original post by OwenFerny)
    It's a good idea to have goals, i.e. 'I want to go to Oxford, so I need to work very hard to get those grades or I will not make it.' Motivational videos are quite good too, I find this one particularly inspiring: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5fsm-...eature=related Get motivated. It won't seem like a chore to revise because its all leading towards something. Good luck.

    Note: I got Bs at GCSE, then AAB at A level, mainly because I had motivation to do well.
    I know the words to this off by heart...
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    Timetables DO NOT work for me - I'm a lazy bugger. But I tend to make sure I understand the topic vaguely and in the couple weeks before my exams I'll literally engulf my revision guide.
    Not really the best advice but it's worked for me.

    Also you should find out what kind of a learner you are ie. visual etc..
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    I explain Maths topics to my friend after I do my revision. If you can explain a topic to someone who doesn't understand it and they get it afterwards, then you know the topic well.
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    (Original post by hopingtobeadentist)
    What's your revision tips/techniques? What's your secret?
    Pick subjects that you really, truly are good at and love.

    No matter you intelligence, if you don't love your subject, you won't want to go home and pick up your textbooks after a day of studying.
    There's no shame in loving a subject you're not good at, but you can't expect an A* unless you're really pretty bright with respect to that subject.
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    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    My advise for English language/literature or generally any essay based exams is this simple anagram

    SECSI -- *thumbs up if you misread it* :rolleyes:

    S -> Statement
    E -> Evidence
    C -> Comment
    S -> Scheme of things
    I -> Interpretation

    SECSI Pwnz PEE(Point evidence explanation) :cool:

    People who write generally in SECSI structure tend to get A/A* comparison to the B grade student still on PEE. :eek:
    Wow, I tried this earlier on a practice question, and my answer got an A* instead of the usual B. Thanks
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    Go through a past paper. Mark it. See where the problems are. Revise in those areas using a revison guide.

    Rinse and repeat with as many different past papers in general. Then revise anything left over.

    It helps to give a bit of structure.
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    Work hard when learning the material the first time around. Seriously, if you do that then you'll know it all by revision time anyway.
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    Carried me through my GCSEs
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    I tile my walls with magic whiteboards and write memory triggers, key facts and things that I want to remember. After seeing them there for a few days, I can just remember them without realising that I ever learnt them- it's like magic!
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    (Original post by KnapAttackUK)
    Wow, I tried this earlier on a practice question, and my answer got an A* instead of the usual B. Thanks
    Can someone PLEASE tell me what is the scheme of things and interpretation :'(
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    (Original post by NeuralGroove)
    Pick subjects that you really, truly are good at and love.

    No matter you intelligence, if you don't love your subject, you won't want to go home and pick up your textbooks after a day of studying.
    There's no shame in loving a subject you're not good at, but you can't expect an A* unless you're really pretty bright with respect to that subject.
    Well that is a bit late for me as I am half way through my GCSE's :/
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    Well for GCSEs, As and A*s should not be a problem. I recommend reading through notes and topics you don't understand and then doing loads of past papers. The questions don't tend to vary too much from year to year. Also make sure you mark the papers and look at what you got wrong and whether the reason for you getting it wrong was because you didn't know it or because of exam technique. Make sure you time yourself especially for subjects like history and maths
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    (Original post by Minotauro)


    Carried me through my GCSEs
    Although CGP books are excellent for last minute revision, (not that many people who get A/A* do this), I actually avoid most CGP books nowadays. The information is too diluted, I feel. It skims over key topics rather than providing the gritty detail that distinguishes the A/A* knowledge in exams.

    The exam board endorsed textbooks provides an unmitigated covering of everything that needs to be known in a syllabus, whereas CGP books tend to lack in certain areas.
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    Work hard, plain and simple. December mock in maths as level c1, U grade. One month of living breathing and eating maths, I got a B. Goes without saying I learnt my lesson!
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    (Original post by hopingtobeadentist)
    Can someone PLEASE tell me what is the scheme of things and interpretation :'(
    (Original post by Mediterrasian)
    Scheme of things is looking at the bigger picture, so like if the evidence you've chosen relates to any main themes for example, or foreshadows anything. Basically, it's looking at the impact it has relating to the whole story of the book/poem.

    Interpretation is how you interpret the evidence, however if you want the A* mark, you have to give multiple. So for an example, using the word 'blue' (I'm too tired to think of anything else, sorry haha), it could be interpreted as showing sadness, but it can also be interpreted as showing coldness in the area because it's a cold colour.

    If you're doing Caroline Ann Duffy poems, Lord of the Flies, Educating Rita and/or Of Mice and Men and need any help on analysing quotes, feel free to message me.
    There
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    (Original post by jcarz)
    Although CGP books are excellent for last minute revision, (not that many people who get A/A* do this), I actually avoid most CGP books nowadays. The information is too diluted, I feel. It skims over key topics rather than providing the gritty detail that distinguishes the A/A* knowledge in exams.

    The exam board endorsed textbooks provides an unmitigated covering of everything that needs to be known in a syllabus, whereas CGP books tend to lack in certain areas.
    Meh, they're terrible for A level (If you want A's anyway)
    but I got 8 A/A*s at GCSE using CGP, I didn't rely on them completely, but they did help, a lot.

    and I did start my revision quite late.
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    (Original post by hopingtobeadentist)
    Well that is a bit late for me as I am half way through my GCSE's :/
    I'm sure it's not too late for you to start loving your subjects; in my opinion you should be able to pick out, at the very least, aspects of the courses that really interest you, even if only because they might one day tie in to, say, dentistry.
    At the end of your GCSEs, you need to be very honest about what it is you want to spend the next few years and perhaps your career doing. Only you can make that decision.

    Best of luck, I imagine it sounds daunting but really, it's very exciting.
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    (Original post by NeuralGroove)
    I'm sure it's not too late for you to start loving your subjects; in my opinion you should be able to pick out, at the very least, aspects of the courses that really interest you, even if only because they might one day tie in to, say, dentistry.
    At the end of your GCSEs, you need to be very honest about what it is you want to spend the next few years and perhaps your career doing. Only you can make that decision.

    Best of luck, I imagine it sounds daunting but really, it's very exciting.
    Yes, I enjoy most subjects such as English literature, Biology, Physics and maths ect..

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Updated: May 20, 2012
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