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Bsc(Hons), Msci(Hons), Msc..What are the differences???

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    For example Mathematics in Imperial College London. It has Bsc(Hons) Mathematics(3 years) and Msci(Hons) Mathematics(4 years). What are the differences?? If I compare it to NUS/HKU Bsc(Hons) 4 years, is NUS/HKU degree equivalent to Bsc(Hons) Mathematics or Msci(Hons) Mathematics in Imperial?? How about Msc???
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    (Original post by glgan1)
    For example Mathematics in Imperial College London. It has Bsc(Hons) Mathematics(3 years) and Msci(Hons) Mathematics(4 years). What are the differences?? If I compare it to NUS/HKU Bsc(Hons) 4 years, is NUS/HKU degree equivalent to Bsc(Hons) Mathematics or Msci(Hons) Mathematics in Imperial?? How about Msc???
    A BSc (Hons) is an undergraduate Bachelors degree with honours
    An MSc (Hons) is an undergraduate Masters degree with honours
    An MSc is a postgraduate Masters degree

    If you have an undergraduate degree, you should apply for the postgraduate Masters degree. If you don't have a degree, you should apply for either of the undergraduate degrees.

    A BSc (Hons) degree is equivalent to a BSc (Hons) degree, no matter how long it takes.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    A BSc (Hons) is an undergraduate Bachelors degree with honours
    An MSc (Hons) is an undergraduate Masters degree with honours
    An MSc is a postgraduate Masters degree

    If you have an undergraduate degree, you should apply for the postgraduate Masters degree. If you don't have a degree, you should apply for either of the undergraduate degrees.

    A BSc (Hons) degree is equivalent to a BSc (Hons) degree, no matter how long it takes.
    So does it mean that a 3 years Bsc(Hons) Mathematics in Imperial is still the same as a 4 years Bsc(Hons) Mathematics in National University of Singapore?? Why do NUS has an additional year??
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    (Original post by glgan1)
    So does it mean that a 3 years Bsc(Hons) Mathematics in Imperial is still the same as a 4 years Bsc(Hons) Mathematics in National University of Singapore?? Why do NUS has an additional year??
    Some countries have 4 year undergrad.. like Scotland and the US.
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    (Original post by Aaron_xyz)
    Some countries have 4 year undergrad.. like Scotland and the US.
    What are the advantages for having 4 years undergrad?
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    Strictly my opinion; the MSci is just a rip-off of the MSc programme. To say that the 4 year BSc is not equivalent to a 4 year MSci is just nonsense; they are the same and to say that the MSci is equivalent to the MSc is just total rubbish.

    MSci is just hiding itself under the name 'masters' but it's not even at all a Masters. It's just another UG degree.

    (Original post by glgan1)
    What are the advantages for having 4 years undergrad?
    Obviously you'll learn more.
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    (Original post by glgan1)
    What are the advantages for having 4 years undergrad?
    Practically none. I'll take maths as an example... If you're interested in the subject, and you think you'll take it on for longer (ie an MSc programme or a PhD) then perhaps an MSci is a valid option.

    However, you can just as easily stop at the BSc, and go for an MSc (which is usually more specialized, things like applied maths, financial maths, mathematical physics). There's no real distinguishing between BSc and MSci graduates, the government put them in to be competitive against Europe, Scotland and Americas' 4 year undergrads. It's basically just an extra undergrad year.

    Moreover, those who do an MSci have a more hefty weighting towards the final two years, which means you're doing modules that are slightly more difficult (but again, no different to a BSc). Someone who would have gotten a 2:1 if they'd just let go at a BSc might find fourth year modules a little taxing and could end up with a 2:2.

    The only advantage I can really see is that you get to do more modules from your degree, so there's a little more scope to find something you enjoy. Trust me though, by the time you get to third year, you'll know what type of maths you like and what you don't. Unless you're extremely intelligent and you're confident of coming out of an MSci with at least a 2:1, don't bother. Sign up for it at first, but drop the MSci in your second year, just in case.
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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    However, you can just as easily stop at the BSc, and go for an MSc (which is usually more specialized, things like applied maths, financial maths, mathematical physics). There's no real distinguishing between BSc and MSci graduates, the government put them in to be competitive against Europe, Scotland and Americas' 4 year undergrads. It's basically just an extra undergrad year.
    Exactly.

    You see how cunning universities in the UK are in making their business/money; by conning/deceiving the students to actually think that the MSci is actually a Masters where as a matter of fact, it's not; like you said, it's just a way for the UK to be competitive and may I add, to add 'more value' deceptively to its already short education system compared to the rest of the world who follow a 4 year structure.

    Moreover, those who do an MSci have a more hefty weighting towards the final two years, which means you're doing modules that are slightly more difficult (but again, no different to a BSc). Someone who would have gotten a 2:1 if they'd just let go at a BSc might find fourth year modules a little taxing and could end up with a 2:2.

    The only advantage I can really see is that you get to do more modules from your degree, so there's a little more scope to find something you enjoy. Trust me though, by the time you get to third year, you'll know what type of maths you like and what you don't. Unless you're extremely intelligent and you're confident of coming out of an MSci with at least a 2:1, don't bother. Sign up for it at first, but drop the MSci in your second year, just in case.
    Bare in mind though, some Unis don't accept 3-year BSc/BA if you want to do a Masters with them. That kind of duration is for Diplomas to them.
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    (Original post by glgan1)
    What are the advantages for having 4 years undergrad?
    Some countries don't teach to A2 standard so they have an additional year for that content.

    And in American uni's you have to take subjects other than your major so this gives time to fulfill those requirements along with your major.
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    I have heard someone told me before that some countries such as US and Singapore have 4 years programme because the additional year comprises general education studies(history of their country etc.) and free electives which are outside of their majors scope.

    (Original post by kka25)
    Exactly.

    Bare in mind though, some Unis don't accept 3-year BSc/BA if you want to do a Masters with them. That kind of duration is for Diplomas to them.
    Which universities don't accept 3 years BSc for master degree?


    So guys is it better to take 3 years BSc(Hons) then another year of Master MSc rather than taking a 4 years BSc(Hons) or MSci(Hons)??
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    (Original post by glgan1)
    I have heard someone told me before that some countries such as US and Singapore have 4 years programme because the additional year comprises general education studies(history of their country etc.) and free electives which are outside of their majors scope.



    Which universities don't accept 3 years BSc for master degree?


    So guys is it better to take 3 years BSc(Hons) then another year of Master MSc rather than taking a 4 years BSc(Hons) or MSci(Hons)??
    yes, it would seem so. Plus it would signal to employers that you have been screened for desirability twice...

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