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Got myself a desmond. What's the cheapest way of doing a second undergraduate degree?

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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    (Original post by ritchie888)
    We're not talking about the Open University, we're talking about whatever sorry excuse of a university you're talking about.

    When I said 'buy degrees online' I meant something like this:

    http://www.buydegree.org/

    "100% Legally issued university degree" - How can I lose!
    you've got a surreal sense of humour... I hope.
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    (Original post by Txi)
    Really ?

    You think a FTSE 100 company will look at a 2.1 from a top 30 U in the same light as a UOL ex 2.1 ?
    well it'll often be someone coming up via a non conventional route making comparison difficult... But tbh a lot of ftse companies hire massive numbers of grads and apparently don't even give much of a monkeys about the subject. Grad scheme fodder they might want naieve applicants to indoctrinate.
    Ultimately they're trying to get people who will be good employees and make them money, not giving prizes for most prestigious degree certificate.
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    NHS degrees are paid for by them even if it's your second time round. And you are entitled to NHS Bursary whilst you study aswell, but this isn't alot of money as far as I can tell! Although I can't imagine that this will be much use to you for engineering. I think architecture students get some help for a second degree too. Everybody else isn't entitled to anything so it may be cheaper to do a masters.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    A fair comparison would be between someone who got a 2:1 from LSE via the usual route and someone who got a 2:1 from LSE via UoL International.

    Its not exactly equivalent, no, because the UoLI graduate won't have completed an undergraduate dissertation. Other than than the exams are identical. It's hard to say which they would find more impressive, it depends what they are looking for. A kid's gotta be pretty smart and motivated to get a 2:1 from LSE working entirely on his own without attending a single lecture or seminar, or even once communicating with a lecturer, surely?

    Plus something like only 1 in 10 UoLI LSE graduates receive a 2:1 or higher, whereas something like 60% of straight LSE graduates do. Talk about standing out from the crowd.
    Sure, I agree but in my experience big employers tend to look down a bit at UOL ex.

    No good reason why as you have mentioned.

    but are you sure the course and the exams are identical to LSE, in that case a lot of people would chance it and take the external route, you'd be saving tens of thousands and could work at the same time .
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    well it'll often be someone coming up via a non conventional route making comparison difficult... But tbh a lot of ftse companies hire massive numbers of grads and apparently don't even give much of a monkeys about the subject. Grad scheme fodder they might want naieve applicants to indoctrinate.
    Ultimately they're trying to get people who will be good employees and make them money, not giving prizes for most prestigious degree certificate.
    Well that's good news.
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    (Original post by Txi)
    Sure, I agree but in my experience big employers tend to look down a bit at UOL ex.

    No good reason why as you have mentioned.

    but are you sure the course and the exams are identical to LSE, in that case a lot of people would chance it and take the external route, you'd be saving tens of thousands and could work at the same time .
    Yup, syllabus, contents, exams, grading criteria are all absolutely identical, I just looked at the two websites to make sure.

    The reason most people don't do it is because its not easy to self-teach an entire degree, especially if you work simultaneously. Not many people have that kind of motivation, in fact over 50% of people drop out.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Yup, syllabus, contents, exams, grading criteria are all absolutely identical, I just looked at the two websites to make sure.

    The reason most people don't do it is because its not easy to self-teach an entire degree, especially if you work simultaneously. Not many people have that kind of motivation, in fact over 50% of people drop out.

    Sure but with the costs and all these days, surely UOL ext would become much more appealing.

    You could enroll in external colleges who conduct tuition and work PT if you wanted, and still save a lot of money compared to some guy who's opted for Hull or whatever.

    In short are LSE not worried that their degrees will be short cut by this route ?
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    (Original post by hi-everybody)
    Having just flunked an exam I needed to score highly on to get a 2:1 I am now just waiting for confirmation of my 2:2 in chemistry.
    As everybody mentioned you should consider going into industry or doing a Masters with acceptance pending. Speaking from experience the right industry exposure will get you a lot further than doing more qualifications unless they're strictly necessary i.e. a lot of synthesis jobs want a Masters/MChem because of the depth of knowledge required.

    I got a 2:2 in a chemistry related discipline and it hasn't been too difficult getting a job - companies like to hire between September-November have a break during January and then go on another recruitment push in February. With education the silver lining is that even if you feel like you've underperformed you can still become what you want to be, it'll just take a bit longer.
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    (Original post by Txi)
    Sure but with the costs and all these days, surely UOL ext would become much more appealing.

    You could enroll in external colleges who conduct tuition and work PT if you wanted, and still save a lot of money compared to some guy who's opted for Hull or whatever.

    In short are LSE not worried that their degrees will be short cut by this route ?
    Who knows? It costs them next to nothing to run, all they have to do is send you a syllabus and then mark your exams each year along with all the regular undergrads.

    You can save a lot of money in the long run, you're right. But for your average 18 year old, finding £4k up front is probably less attractive than repaying £27k over the course of 30 years when they have a well paid job and it won't seem such a big deal. Plus, what happens when you drop out as half the people do, thats a load of money wasted right there.

    and of course, going away to university teaches you a lot more things than just what you learn in lectures.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Who knows? It costs them next to nothing to run, all they have to do is send you a syllabus and then mark your exams each year along with all the regular undergrads.

    You can save a lot of money in the long run, you're right. But for your average 18 year old, finding £4k up front is probably less attractive than repaying £27k over the course of 30 years when they have a well paid job and it won't seem such a big deal. Plus, what happens when you drop out as half the people do, thats a load of money wasted right there.

    and of course, going away to university teaches you a lot more things than just what you learn in lectures.
    The reasoning is quite straight forward.

    The External system is a hangover from the days of the Empire, but is a very big income stream for the University, for some people, this will be their only chance of getting a recognised degree, Nelson Mandela is the person normally cited in this regard, having read Laws whilst in prison. This isn't actually that uncommon - there is even procedure for students who can't register due to being incarcerated.

    The problem is that the programme is actually rock-hard. Except for Laws, all the programmes are administered by a particular college (LSE, Birkbeck etc) and after some debate, it was agreed that the degree certificates themselves would be indistinguishable (ie they say "University of London" "BA History" "Royal Holloway" or whatever - exactly as the regular ones") so the colleges will absolutely not jeopardise their reps.

    I can only speak for Laws, but the situation is actually quite comical in reality - the syllabus and exams are set by a conglomeration of the colleges as it is the largest programme by a long way - the numbers are sketchy, but there apparently more than 15,000 LLB undergraduates at any given time - possibly many more.

    Of those, the majority will be "1st years" who have either not taken exams, or who have failed them and not progressed. There are apparently a lot of people for whom there is considerable kudos in simply being registered and can say they "are reading Law at London". The number of people actually graduating isn't that big.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    These are the stats for last year's exams. A regular student would be crazy to enrol on such a programme if they didn't have to - with basically a zero chance of getting a 1st, and a very small chance of a 2i. A lot of the 2is are obtained by people already holding an undergraduate degree.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Ah yes, the University of London. What a sorry excuse for a university that is, one of its principal constituents is only ranked 2nd in the country ahead of Oxford.
    (Original post by cambio wechsel)
    the University of London International Programmes are the degrees with which graduates from the New College of the Humanities will end up, and that after paying 54 grand (up front) in tuition. They're real degrees.
    (Original post by Clip)
    The University of London programme they are referring to is the basis of the London Colleges like....UCL. University of London has always been an examining board first and foremost, and what they do is issue degrees to the colleges.

    And yes, you can read a BA or BSc for something in the region of £4000 total.

    You're not buying it. The syllabus and exams are from one of the colleges (eg LSE for Economics, Heythrop for Theology, RHUL for History), you sit those exams with thousands of other students, and if you pass your finals, you get a bona fide degree from LSE or wherever.

    Not making it up. It's gospel.
    (Original post by Joinedup)
    you've got a surreal sense of humour... I hope.
    From my quick Google on the original post, the university didn't look legit and the prices were dubious. I apologise.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Who knows? It costs them next to nothing to run, all they have to do is send you a syllabus and then mark your exams each year along with all the regular undergrads.

    You can save a lot of money in the long run, you're right. But for your average 18 year old, finding £4k up front is probably less attractive than repaying £27k over the course of 30 years when they have a well paid job and it won't seem such a big deal. Plus, what happens when you drop out as half the people do, thats a load of money wasted right there.

    and of course, going away to university teaches you a lot more things than just what you learn in lectures.

    Yep gotcha.

    Incidentally what happens if you are on a regular FT course at uni and then quit say after 1 year, I suppose the loan has to be paid back prorata ?

    But when, immediately after you quit of when you get a good job ?
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    (Original post by Txi)
    Yep gotcha.

    Incidentally what happens if you are on a regular FT course at uni and then quit say after 1 year, I suppose the loan has to be paid back prorata ?

    But when, immediately after you quit of when you get a good job ?
    You pay it back under the same conditions as if you completed your degree.

    The exception being if you drop out part way through a term and have already been given some money in advance - that bit has to be payed back straight away.
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    Open University lets you transfer your credits from your first two years then make the last year up with them - im thinking on doing this to bring my 2:2 to a 2:1 aswell.
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    (Original post by pshewitt1)
    i got myself an Ezio...he kicks desmonds butt
    Might want to aim for a Connors... Honors... get it? Aw man I crack myself up.
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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    Might want to aim for a Connors... Honors... get it? Aw man I crack myself up.
    have you seen the trailer :/ he's like the BNP..a contradictory Racist :L but yes excellent wordplay :P Don't get why i was negged twice

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