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IS University of Greenwich good in Law?

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    I have an offer from Greenwich and London met, after go through all the comments, I have decided to go with greenwich, I just want to know if anyone has any idea about it, and how are the employability of the graduates, how easy is to get an LPC and a pupilage and also a TC?
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    (Original post by avator)
    I have an offer from Greenwich and London met, after go through all the comments, I have decided to go with greenwich, I just want to know if anyone has any idea about it, and how are the employability of the graduates, how easy is to get an LPC and a pupilage and also a TC?
    Six months after graduating 35% are studying only, 8% are working and studying, and 44% are working only. Of the 52% working, 45% or 23.4% of the total are working in graduate jobs.

    Provided you get a 2:2 you will have no difficulty getting a place on the LPC.

    Pupillages are very hard to come by for people with very good degrees from very good universities. In 2010/11 there were 446 pupillages, of which only the holders of 30% were aged under 25. In other words only about 134 people took the simple conveyor belt-university at 18/19, [GDL], BPTC, pupillage. Not all of those will be law graduates.


    Training contracts are easier than this to get. Somewhere around 15-20% of all law graduates secure one. Obviously that figure includes all universities including those better thought of than Greenwich.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Six months after graduating 35% are studying only, 8% are working and studying, and 44% are working only. Of the 52% working, 45% or 23.4% of the total are working in graduate jobs.

    Provided you get a 2:2 you will have no difficulty getting a place on the LPC.

    Pupillages are very hard to come by for people with very good degrees from very good universities. In 2010/11 there were 446 pupillages, of which only the holders of 30% were aged under 25. In other words only about 134 people took the simple conveyor belt-university at 18/19, [GDL], BPTC, pupillage. Not all of those will be law graduates.


    Training contracts are easier than this to get. Somewhere around 15-20% of all law graduates secure one. Obviously that figure includes all universities including those better thought of than Greenwich.
    Have you heard about BPP university college?
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    (Original post by avator)
    Have you heard about BPP university college?
    I'm doing the LLB at BPP (and hoping to be a barrister or a legal academic although I realise it will be nearly impossible).

    If you're hoping that the stats from BPP will be better than University of Greenwich then I suspect the position at the moment is unclear. The LLB program at BPP is in its third year I believe, so the only graduates from it are those who did a '2 year accelerated' degree. Zero of those achieved pupillage (but thats entirely to be expected, very few at the top universities achieve pupillage before the BPTC and it's questionable how many even applied). There are a few graduates with pre-LPC training contracts from what I've heard. The newer the course, the more skeptically employers will view it. The fact that BPP is well-known for its post-grad courses (GDL, LPC, BPTC) will not impact much on how its LLB is viewed.

    You will need a first to be in with much chance, I suspect, although that will not be much different at Greenwich either.
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    Unless you get a very good first then I feel you will be extremely unlikely to get a good city Training Contract. The Bar is going to be largely off limits to Greenwich grads. You may even struggle at smaller provincial firms - the firm that my parents work at is the smallest in Norwich, and they look to recruit people from universities around the level of the UEA. Greenwich is below the level of the UEA.
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    (Original post by Sean9001)
    Unless you get a very good first then I feel you will be extremely unlikely to get a good city Training Contract. The Bar is going to be largely off limits to Greenwich grads. You may even struggle at smaller provincial firms - the firm that my parents work at is the smallest in Norwich, and they look to recruit people from universities around the level of the UEA. Greenwich is below the level of the UEA.
    Your university shouldn't determine the quality of your academia.
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    (Original post by iamjeeoh)
    Your university shouldn't determine the quality of your academia.
    Well it does, welcome to the law.
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    (Original post by Norton1)
    Well it does, welcome to the law.
    It has nothing to do with law. Its a silly claim. Look at all of the polytechnics. Plenty of successful people come out of them, including barristers and QC's. Just because you go to Oxford doesn't mean your better than someone who goes to London Met. The London Met student could easily obtain many more merits that the Oxford student.
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    (Original post by iamjeeoh)
    It has nothing to do with law. Its a silly claim. Look at all of the polytechnics. Plenty of successful people come out of them, including barristers and QC's. Just because you go to Oxford doesn't mean your better than someone who goes to London Met. The London Met student could easily obtain many more merits that the Oxford student.
    Plenty of very good graduates came out of the Polytechnics and there are indeed QCs that attended them.

    But the past is another country, they do things differently there.

    There are far more law students now than there were then and there are far more law students at pre-92 universities.

    Whilst the number of training contracts have expanded, they have not expanded at anywhere near the rate that law graduates have increased.

    The bar has changed more radically. Pupillage was easy to obtain, a tenancy was not. However, a pupillage is a year long recruitment process. Your degree mattered very little when the senior members of chambers and the clerk had the opportunity to see how you worked for a year.

    Posters on TSR tended to over-egg the importance of going to a "top" university but applicants destined for an ex-Poly tend to get very chippy about it. What you don't see on TSR is third years and recent graduates from ex-Polys saying how easy it all was for them and their mates.

    The university name does mean something because it tends to correlate to past academic performance and past academic performance has a correlation with academic ability.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Plenty of very good graduates came out of the Polytechnics and there are indeed QCs that attended them.

    But the past is another country, they do things differently there.

    There are far more law students now than there were then and there are far more law students at pre-92 universities.

    Whilst the number of training contracts have expanded, they have not expanded at anywhere near the rate that law graduates have increased.

    The bar has changed more radically. Pupillage was easy to obtain, a tenancy was not. However, a pupillage is a year long recruitment process. Your degree mattered very little when the senior members of chambers and the clerk had the opportunity to see how you worked for a year.

    Posters on TSR tended to over-egg the importance of going to a "top" university but applicants destined for an ex-Poly tend to get very chippy about it. What you don't see on TSR is third years and recent graduates from ex-Polys saying how easy it all was for them and their mates.

    The university name does mean something because it tends to correlate to past academic performance and past academic performance has a correlation with academic ability.
    At the end of the day your life is what you make of it, therefore the same applies to your career path and you can be a barrister regardless of your university of choice. I'm going to Brighton to do Law, but then I'd like to do my masters at LSE or City. I don't know if I have any chance of becoming a barrister because I havn't applied yet, but I intend to see where I can go and hope to achieve the best. I'm determined and I've gone from failing GCSE student to one of the highest achievers at Alevel.
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    (Original post by iamjeeoh)
    At the end of the day your life is what you make of it, therefore the same applies to your career path and you can be a barrister regardless of your university of choice. I'm going to Brighton to do Law, but then I'd like to do my masters at LSE or City. I don't know if I have any chance of becoming a barrister because I havn't applied yet, but I intend to see where I can go and hope to achieve the best. I'm determined and I've gone from failing GCSE student to one of the highest achievers at Alevel.
    Good luck.

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