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Please Help, I'm standing on the brink of DISASTER!!

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    I am currently at university in Scotland studying History. I will pay a total of roughly 7300 for my whole degree. I have just completed first year last week.

    However, since I can rembember (primary school days) I have wanted to be a physiotherapist. The reason why i didn't apply for it was because I messed around in school during GCSEs and was therefore refused entry for the higher tier science paper. So when it came to my 6th form application i didn't have the BB needed to study science A-level, I more than likely could have argued with them to let me, but as Uni of Ulster was my only option at the time (only a rare number of NI students outside Belfast will go to non-Irish/liverpool universities or even consider them.

    Anyway Uni of Ulster at the time accepted PE as a science, but instead of PE I took a stupid sports related 12unit BTEC, and found a few months in that this wouldn't get me onto physiotherapy. I then decided to abandon my ambitions to become a physio and pursue a history degree aiming at law/journalism/business afterwards.

    So here I am after my first year of this degree. Employment prospects look bleak and both the fields I am looking at will be really hard to get into. I checked uni stats and saw that a large number of history students from this uni aren't in grad jobs, a frightening high number are sales assisstants and cashiers apparently. I intend to do a post-grad and hopefully will avoid such a destiny, but it has recently occurred to me that the grad-jobs available to me aren't jobs I want to do forever. I'd rather have a more hands on, people interacting and with a flexiblity to travel and work outdoors at times.



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    I may have a chance to do A-level biology next year and have it completed by June 2013. The problem is that it would be in a different sitting and I am worried some universities will think I am a bit or a nomad on the career highway with no real desire to be a pyhsio. My biggest fear is that I will end up with 5 rejections and end up with nothing. Even if I get an offer the hard part is still to come with A-level biology which would need an A-grade. Not only that, all but one universty (which I don't want to go to) will be charging £9000, so for my full history degree here, I'd pay less than one year of physiotherapy.

    Any advice?
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    Probably only the top universities will look unfavourably upon your sudden change of plan. If you're really determined, you could sign up to a degree course that has a science foundation year at the start? Pretty much anybody is accepted onto these courses, and you're guaranteed a place at that university if you meet the requirements during the foundation year.
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    (Original post by Retrodiction)
    Probably only the top universities will look unfavourably upon your sudden change of plan. If you're really determined, you could sign up to a degree course that has a science foundation year at the start? Pretty much anybody is accepted onto these courses, and you're guaranteed a place at that university if you meet the requirements during the foundation year.
    Don't think thats an option with the new fees. I have

    one year of studyy already + a fdn year = 2years

    3yrs Physio degree - 2yrs Previous Study = 1yr I have to pay for myself.
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    (Original post by herostraticflame)
    I am currently at university in Scotland studying History. I will pay a total of roughly 7300 for my whole degree. I have just completed first year last week.

    However, since I can rembember (primary school days) I have wanted to be a physiotherapist. The reason why i didn't apply for it was because I messed around in school during GCSEs and was therefore refused entry for the higher tier science paper. So when it came to my 6th form application i didn't have the BB needed to study science A-level, I more than likely could have argued with them to let me, but as Uni of Ulster was my only option at the time (only a rare number of NI students outside Belfast will go to non-Irish/liverpool universities or even consider them.

    Anyway Uni of Ulster at the time accepted PE as a science, but instead of PE I took a stupid sports related 12unit BTEC, and found a few months in that this wouldn't get me onto physiotherapy. I then decided to abandon my ambitions to become a physio and pursue a history degree aiming at law/journalism/business afterwards.

    So here I am after my first year of this degree. Employment prospects look bleek and both the fields I am looking at will be really hard to get into. I checked uni stats and saw that a large number of history students from this uni aren't in grad jobs, a frightening high number are sales assisstants and cashiers apparently. I intend to do a post-grad and hopefully will avoid such a destiny, but it has recently occurred to me that the grad-jobs available to me aren't jobs I want to do forever. I'd rather have a more hands on, people interacting and with a flexiblity to travel and work outdoors at times.



    Too long to Read?
    I may have a chance to do A-level biology next year and have it completed by June 2013. The problem is that it would be in a different sitting and I am worried some universities will think I am a bit or a nomad on the career highway with no real desire to be a pyhsio. My biggest fear is that I will end up with 5 rejections and end up with nothing. Even if I get an offer the hard part is still to come with A-level biology which would need an A-grade. Not only that, all but one universty (which I don't want to go to) will be charging £9000, so for my full history degree here, I'd pay less than one year of physiotherapy.

    Any advice?
    First off, what on earth is that bit in bold?
    Half of my year at school are at English/Scottish/Welsh unis. The other half are mostly at QUB some at UU and a few at college or not at uni.

    Secondly, you're clearly not happy doing what you're doing so you should definitely try and get into physiotherapy.
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    Hi there
    Maybe look at other routes like foundation years?
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    Go for it if it's what you want to do! I can't imagine many universities will look at you unfavourably for it, if anything they'll admire you for it, you clearly really want to do this course if you're willing to leave university, go through A-level again and reapply!

    I'm in pretty much exactly the same situation, i'm in first year and i'm currently looking at switching course for september, although i'm unsure whether it's possible and they may require that I resit a couple of A-levels, in that case i'm going to take a year out and resit them. Like you i've always wanted to do this course, for as long as i can remember, but for various reasons that I won't go into didn't apply for it.
    After a year on my current course I know that i've made a mistake by settling and i'm going to do all I can to change that. If it means I don't finish my degree until a couple of years after I had planned then so be, at least i'll be doing what I want!

    1 year of doing a degree that you don't really want to be doing is bad enough, i'd hate to feel the same about my degree when i'm coming to the final week of the 3rd year!
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    (Original post by herostraticflame)
    It is a hugely exaggarated statement yes. But you can't deny that those from outside Belfast, particulary the further west you go, most students will only consider NI unis, then southern ones. I saw a map of student destinations from my old school, about 70% all at UU/QUB, 5% down south, 25% in Great Britain and of the 25% there were large numbers in Liverpool and about 50% of the latter percentile would probably have been QUB rejects looking at medicine type subjects.

    Where are you from? Surely you aren't denying that NI students are ridiculously close minded when it comes to UCAS?
    I went to school in Lisburn, grew up in Dromore.
    I know there is always a large chunk who prefer to stay (I know someone who turned down Imperial for QUB!) but this is normally balanced out with those who leave. I reckon it's about 50/50.
    My mum studied at Edinburgh, my brother and sister both at Glasgow, and my eldest cousin at Oxford. My younger cousins both applied outside out NI but one was only accepted to QUB (Medicine) and the other stayed because of his gf (studying at QUB also).

    I suppose I have no idea how it's like out west. This is just from people I know in the Lisburn/Dromore/Banbridge area.
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    hi, I honestly think that you should go for it, do the bioology. If you are motivated enough, you can get the A. You're clearly not stupid, and you're now more mature. Your passion for physio is clearly deeply ingrained, as you haven't been able to let it go.

    Imagine yourself in ten years time. What do you want? Do you want to look back and think 'I wish I had tried again for physio'...

    I know the debt seems a lot, but all graduates leave with a hefty debt at the moment. Dont let that put you off.

    DO IT!!!!

    ps I'm 27 and am just fininshing my A levels as i wanted to be a vet when i was young but pissed about at school. ffs whats the worst that can happen? if it goes tits up you can always rejoin your history course and do post grad journalism...

    good luck
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    (Original post by Cll_ws)
    Go for it if it's what you want to do! I can't imagine many universities will look at you unfavourably for it, if anything they'll admire you for it, you clearly really want to do this course if you're willing to leave university, go through A-level again and reapply!

    I'm in pretty much exactly the same situation, i'm in first year and i'm currently looking at switching course for september, although i'm unsure whether it's possible and they may require that I resit a couple of A-levels, in that case i'm going to take a year out and resit them. Like you i've always wanted to do this course, for as long as i can remember, but for various reasons that I won't go into didn't apply for it.
    After a year on my current course I know that i've made a mistake by settling and i'm going to do all I can to change that. If it means I don't finish my degree until a couple of years after I had planned then so be, at least i'll be doing what I want!

    1 year of doing a degree that you don't really want to be doing is bad enough, i'd hate to feel the same about my degree when i'm coming to the final week of the 3rd year!
    Comforting to know there are others What is it you are studying now/looking to do?

    Yeah, if I stay I will probably think forever that I should be doing something else. It will probably only get worse as I go on as it means less student funding until it gets to the point where it is impossible for me to fund a physio degree.

    Certainly some universities have told me they accept different sittings, but I do expect a grilling if I am lucky enough to get an interview. Still need to hear back from the college to see if they will let me do the bio a-level though.
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    (Original post by herostraticflame)
    Certainly some universities have told me they accept different sittings, but I do expect a grilling if I am lucky enough to get an interview.
    then be honest. say that you are now more grown up (yup, they like things like that) and that you wanted to follow your life-long ambition. history was second choice, and you never stopped wanting to be a physio. so you were motivated enough to take extra time to meet the requirements, and to put off your history course. you made sacrifices, and believe that they will pay off. blah blah blah...
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    (Original post by herostraticflame)
    Comforting to know there are others What is it you are studying now/looking to do?

    Yeah, if I stay I will probably think forever that I should be doing something else. It will probably only get worse as I go on as it means less student funding until it gets to the point where it is impossible for me to fund a physio degree.

    Certainly some universities have told me they accept different sittings, but I do expect a grilling if I am lucky enough to get an interview. Still need to hear back from the college to see if they will let me do the bio a-level though.

    I'm studying Landscape Architecture, looking to switch to Architecture. Architecture wasn't available to me at the time of applying as I applied quite late, so as you can see I sort of went for the next most similar thing and settled for that, but it was probably a mistake looking at it now. I should of taken this year off and reapplied for this September. I did enjoy my course though, it just isn't what I want to do.
    If taking a year off is the only option, then i'll look to resit a couple of a-levels, probably just the exams as oppose to actually going back to college, as I know I can improve my a-levels because in a couple of them I only narrowly missed out on higher grades. It'll improve my chances I guess, as well as giving me something to do!
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    If you are unhappy and you really don't want to pursue your degree, and you are dead set on being a physio, then yes maybe it is a good idea to switch.

    Don't underestimate the worth of a History BA though. Especially one with such low fees.

    I've talked to a fair few physios of late, and to be honest, it doesn't seem like a fantastic career path. I'm not trying to slag it off at all, I think it depends on the person whether they enjoy it. Maybe though, before dropping everything to become a physio, you should try and get more of a feel for what it is like to be one? Could you talk to some physios? Or even better spend some time shadowing a physio?

    There are so many career paths out there that a solid subject like history opens up for you. What about Marketing, Sales, Buying, HR, PR, Consultancy, Management... I could go on and on. If you study physio you will be much more limited in your options after uni. The key here is work experience. A history BA + work experience has lots of career paths and good jobs waiting. A physio degree + work experience pretty much leads to one job, with limited career progression.

    I switched degree course. I'm not sure it was the best choice in retrospect.

    Just some food for thought.
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    (Original post by meow444)
    If you are unhappy and you really don't want to pursue your degree, and you are dead set on being a physio, then yes maybe it is a good idea to switch.

    Don't underestimate the worth of a History BA though. Especially one with such low fees.

    I've talked to a fair few physios of late, and to be honest, it doesn't seem like a fantastic career path. I'm not trying to slag it off at all, I think it depends on the person whether they enjoy it. Maybe though, before dropping everything to become a physio, you should try and get more of a feel for what it is like to be one? Could you talk to some physios? Or even better spend some time shadowing a physio?

    There are so many career paths out there that a solid subject like history opens up for you. What about Marketing, Sales, Buying, HR, PR, Consultancy, Management... I could go on and on. If you study physio you will be much more limited in your options after uni. The key here is work experience. A history BA + work experience has lots of career paths and good jobs waiting. A physio degree + work experience pretty much leads to one job, with limited career progression.

    I switched degree course. I'm not sure it was the best choice in retrospect.

    Just some food for thought.
    it is not so much I am unhappy here or anything, it's more that I feel I should be doing physiotherapy.

    How come you/they don't think it is such a good career?

    I did a weeks worth of shadowing exp. back in 2009, it was then that I was told there was a good chance my BTEC wouldn't suffice and when I checked it out it seemed to be true, it was the end of october by then and too late to change my subjects. I decided then to get off the ship and board another. Sadly today I am still wishing I was on it

    while I agree history is very transferable, the uni stats tell me that a degree from my uni in history may not even allow me to get the work exp. Although if I do stay I will be doing a wide range of extra cirric. to enhance my elmployment, but I will more than likely need to postgrad. in a business related field. I would feel so so depressed if I ended up living a home with no chance of a job after my degree while save for the 10k needed for the pg.courses I am looking at. Particularly when large numbers of my friends would be in grad jobs such as business and dentistry (I'm already a couple of years behind). I think it is this that is most frightening.

    What did to switch from and to what?
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    (Original post by herostraticflame)
    it is not so much I am unhappy here or anything, it's more that I feel I should be doing physiotherapy.

    How come you/they don't think it is such a good career?

    I did a weeks worth of shadowing exp. back in 2009, it was then that I was told there was a good chance my BTEC wouldn't suffice and when I checked it out it seemed to be true, it was the end of october by then and too late to change my subjects. I decided then to get off the ship and board another. Sadly today I am still wishing I was on it

    while I agree history is very transferable, the uni stats tell me that a degree from my uni in history may not even allow me to get the work exp. Although if I do stay I will be doing a wide range of extra cirric. to enhance my elmployment, but I will more than likely need to postgrad. in a business related field. I would feel so so depressed if I ended up living a home with no chance of a job after my degree while save for the 10k needed for the pg.courses I am looking at. Particularly when large numbers of my friends would be in grad jobs such as business and dentistry (I'm already a couple of years behind). I think it is this that is most frightening.

    What did to switch from and to what?
    Yes I'm afraid it does somewhat depend on your uni how much your degree is worth. If you are at a young/ex poly uni, like say Northumbria, rather than a top 20 uni, then it is generally better, in terms of graduate employment, to do a course that your uni is reputable for, and more practical/vocational courses are often the ones that these kind of unis excel in. However with the right work experience, I think you will have no problem getting a job. It is this that is key. Your degree really isn't the be all end all.

    As for work experience, I would recommend asking your uni careers centre, they might have some contacts within local industry or some vacancies or even some work experience schemes. Or you could try and arrange something yourself. A bit of unpaid work experience, even just a week or two, in a relevant area to your graduate career, will go much much further than having extracurriculars on your CV. There are lots of summer schemes you can apply for.

    Sorry I did read that bit about the BTEC but didn't consider it properly - it makes sense that you must have done some shadowing, I should have thought of that. I guess you probably have a better idea than me of what it is like to be a physio in that case. Anyway the reasons my physios have been complaining to me about their jobs are: low pay (my physio at the moment gets 19k), NHS bureaucracy/badly run, bad pensions since the cuts, monotony (deal with the same injury all the time, always just supervising classes in the gym which isn't very hands on), not much chance for career progression or change of career path.

    Don't let this stop you though from doing what you want. Just think carefully about all the pros and cons, ya know? And don't think your degree is worthless.

    Oh also, about postgrad. I think, again, employers really value work experience over postgrad. That said, if you want to do a masters but you're worried about the costs, have a look into doing one abroad. There are a lot of European countries where doing a masters is actually free (and they run courses in english!).

    I switched from economics and politics to english lit.
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    (Original post by meow444)
    Yes I'm afraid it does somewhat depend on your uni how much your degree is worth. If you are at a young/ex poly uni, like say Northumbria, rather than a top 20 uni, then it is generally better, in terms of graduate employment, to do a course that your uni is reputable for, and more practical/vocational courses are often the ones that these kind of unis excel in. However with the right work experience, I think you will have no problem getting a job. It is this that is key. Your degree really isn't the be all end all.

    As for work experience, I would recommend asking your uni careers centre, they might have some contacts within local industry or some vacancies or even some work experience schemes. Or you could try and arrange something yourself. A bit of unpaid work experience, even just a week or two, in a relevant area to your graduate career, will go much much further than having extracurriculars on your CV. There are lots of summer schemes you can apply for.

    Sorry I did read that bit about the BTEC but didn't consider it properly - it makes sense that you must have done some shadowing, I should have thought of that. I guess you probably have a better idea than me of what it is like to be a physio in that case. Anyway the reasons my physios have been complaining to me about their jobs are: low pay (my physio at the moment gets 19k), NHS bureaucracy/badly run, bad pensions since the cuts, monotony (deal with the same injury all the time, always just supervising classes in the gym which isn't very hands on), not much chance for career progression or change of career path.

    Don't let this stop you though from doing what you want. Just think carefully about all the pros and cons, ya know? And don't think your degree is worthless.

    Oh also, about postgrad. I think, again, employers really value work experience over postgrad. That said, if you want to do a masters but you're worried about the costs, have a look into doing one abroad. There are a lot of European countries where doing a masters is actually free (and they run courses in english!).

    I switched from economics and politics to english lit.
    I'm at Uni of Dundee, so by no means a bad university and a good degree (1:1) would be a huge advantage, that said the statistics didn't look so promising, think it was 70% in non-grad jobs.

    Yeah, those are cons of physiotherapy I've heard before, though the monotony is a new one. I don't plan on staying in the UK long after I qualify, really just to get some money together an exp. then I'd go abroad. While I agree to an extent about career progression I would have to point out that a large number of physios will go into the private sector also, wokring with sports teams for example. So while there is only 'one' job you can do, there is a wide range of areas you can work in as well as a wide range you can specialise in.

    There is also management as well, enough work exp. and the right qualifications e.g. pg in management, MBA etc also opens up those doors, just as it would with any other degree, that said, with a physio degree and work exp. I would be confined to health service management. Plus biology/PE teacher could also be on the cards.

    Can I just ask how long the physio you know has been working?

    also, what do you plan on doing after your degree?
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    (Original post by Cll_ws)
    I'm studying Landscape Architecture, looking to switch to Architecture. Architecture wasn't available to me at the time of applying as I applied quite late, so as you can see I sort of went for the next most similar thing and settled for that, but it was probably a mistake looking at it now. I should of taken this year off and reapplied for this September. I did enjoy my course though, it just isn't what I want to do.
    If taking a year off is the only option, then i'll look to resit a couple of a-levels, probably just the exams as oppose to actually going back to college, as I know I can improve my a-levels because in a couple of them I only narrowly missed out on higher grades. It'll improve my chances I guess, as well as giving me something to do!
    Where are you studying at the moment? I don't know about all universities, but Sheffield have a similar 1st year in both courses, so that it is supposed to be easy enough to swap. So maybe it would be an idea to ask your current tutors. As for A-levels, what do you currently have? If you have AAA/AAB/ABB then you probably won't have to resit. But resitting without lessons would be very difficult so that may be hard to do and possibly not worth it.
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    (Original post by herostraticflame)
    I'm at Uni of Dundee, so by no means a bad university and a good degree (1:1) would be a huge advantage, that said the statistics didn't look so promising, think it was 70% in non-grad jobs.

    Yeah, those are cons of physiotherapy I've heard before, though the monotony is a new one. I don't plan on staying in the UK long after I qualify, really just to get some money together an exp. then I'd go abroad. While I agree to an extent about career progression I would have to point out that a large number of physios will go into the private sector also, wokring with sports teams for example. So while there is only 'one' job you can do, there is a wide range of areas you can work in as well as a wide range you can specialise in.

    There is also management as well, enough work exp. and the right qualifications e.g. pg in management, MBA etc also opens up those doors, just as it would with any other degree, that said, with a physio degree and work exp. I would be confined to health service management. Plus biology/PE teacher could also be on the cards.

    Can I just ask how long the physio you know has been working?

    also, what do you plan on doing after your degree?
    Ah well the Uni of Dundee is a pretty decent uni I believe so yeah, no worries there I guess with a uni like yours, part of the reason there is going to be a higher % of people in non-grad jobs compared to students in towns like London or Manc or Birmingham, is because there are less grad schemes/jobs in Dundee and surrounds. If you are willing to move for a job after uni then it will make finding a grad job easier.

    Did you know that physiotherapy is on the list for the 'skilled workers visa' for Australia? Just in case that is somewhere you would like to immigrate to. I could imagine physios might be in demand in Canada and other countries too.

    I'm not sure how long my physio has been working, I think a couple of years maybe? Not super long anyway.

    My plan at the moment is to go into marketing, although I don't have much work experience. I think this is why I keep advising like everyone on TSR to get work experience :rolleyes: I've been applying to jobs and I really, really understand now the importance of relevant work experience. Certainly for marketing, your degree discipline and grades aren't that important. I've done loads of jobs, but none of them are relevant enough to properly support my application. I wish I had decided on this career earlier, then I would have probably gotten some better experience by now.
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    (Original post by herostraticflame)
    I am currently at university in Scotland studying History. I will pay a total of roughly 7300 for my whole degree. I have just completed first year last week.

    However, since I can rembember (primary school days) I have wanted to be a physiotherapist. The reason why i didn't apply for it was because I messed around in school during GCSEs and was therefore refused entry for the higher tier science paper. So when it came to my 6th form application i didn't have the BB needed to study science A-level, I more than likely could have argued with them to let me, but as Uni of Ulster was my only option at the time (only a rare number of NI students outside Belfast will go to non-Irish/liverpool universities or even consider them.

    Anyway Uni of Ulster at the time accepted PE as a science, but instead of PE I took a stupid sports related 12unit BTEC, and found a few months in that this wouldn't get me onto physiotherapy. I then decided to abandon my ambitions to become a physio and pursue a history degree aiming at law/journalism/business afterwards.

    So here I am after my first year of this degree. Employment prospects look bleek and both the fields I am looking at will be really hard to get into. I checked uni stats and saw that a large number of history students from this uni aren't in grad jobs, a frightening high number are sales assisstants and cashiers apparently. I intend to do a post-grad and hopefully will avoid such a destiny, but it has recently occurred to me that the grad-jobs available to me aren't jobs I want to do forever. I'd rather have a more hands on, people interacting and with a flexiblity to travel and work outdoors at times.



    Too long to Read?
    I may have a chance to do A-level biology next year and have it completed by June 2013. The problem is that it would be in a different sitting and I am worried some universities will think I am a bit or a nomad on the career highway with no real desire to be a pyhsio. My biggest fear is that I will end up with 5 rejections and end up with nothing. Even if I get an offer the hard part is still to come with A-level biology which would need an A-grade. Not only that, all but one universty (which I don't want to go to) will be charging £9000, so for my full history degree here, I'd pay less than one year of physiotherapy.

    Any advice?
    Well, I'm kind of in the same situation as you. I'm currently in my first year doing a psychology degree at a below average university. The employment prospects were bleak also... I was really apprehensive about reapplying to top universities as A) I didn't meet the entry requirements (resitting one alevel module in the summer) and B) I was aiming for a place at Exeter to do law.


    I gave it a shot and now I have a conditional offer to study law there next year!

    If you're not happy youve got to think you'll be doing this for the rest of your life!
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    (Original post by ellasmith)
    Well, I'm kind of in the same situation as you. I'm currently in my first year doing a psychology degree at a below average university. The employment prospects were bleak also... I was really apprehensive about reapplying to top universities as A) I didn't meet the entry requirements (resitting one alevel module in the summer) and B) I was aiming for a place at Exeter to do law.


    I gave it a shot and now I have a conditional offer to study law there next year!

    If you're not happy youve got to think you'll be doing this for the rest of your life!
    yeah I think I am almost certainly going to try for physio provided the college lets me take biology.

    good luck with your exams this summer then, hopefully you'll get into exeter.



    (Original post by meow444)
    Ah well the Uni of Dundee is a pretty decent uni I believe so yeah, no worries there I guess with a uni like yours, part of the reason there is going to be a higher % of people in non-grad jobs compared to students in towns like London or Manc or Birmingham, is because there are less grad schemes/jobs in Dundee and surrounds. If you are willing to move for a job after uni then it will make finding a grad job easier.

    Did you know that physiotherapy is on the list for the 'skilled workers visa' for Australia? Just in case that is somewhere you would like to immigrate to. I could imagine physios might be in demand in Canada and other countries too.

    I'm not sure how long my physio has been working, I think a couple of years maybe? Not super long anyway.

    My plan at the moment is to go into marketing, although I don't have much work experience. I think this is why I keep advising like everyone on TSR to get work experience :rolleyes: I've been applying to jobs and I really, really understand now the importance of relevant work experience. Certainly for marketing, your degree discipline and grades aren't that important. I've done loads of jobs, but none of them are relevant enough to properly support my application. I wish I had decided on this career earlier, then I would have probably gotten some better experience by now.
    I did yes, last time I checked Canada and New Zealand have them on their long term shortage lists as well. Definitely want to go abroad, wanted to since I had a since about my mid-teens. This is another huge factor in physiotherapy as well, it gives me more flexiblity to travel around the world. Mind you I may have to take a few exams in order to gain recognition in some places.

    Although I'm pretty set on switching right now, if I stay I'm probably be looking in marketing/advertising also. Got a list of things to do before I complete my degree that will hopefully make me more employable.
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Updated: May 13, 2012
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