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Radiotherapy/Radiography Job Prospects

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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    Hello, I am contemplating studying the MSC (Pre - Registration) in either of the aforementioned courses and was just wondering whether people had any knowledge of the job prospects in both careers.

    I feel that I would possibly gain more job satisfaction form Radiotherapy, however I am currently in the process of arranging a day in both departments to hopefully help me with my decision.

    I would also be interested if anyone has any idea of the stress levels in these careers, as I feel I want a position where I can switch of to some degree when I go home. I appreciate most professional jobs are going to carry a level of stress and therefore I am not anticipating that these are an easy option.

    Thanks
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    Well I'm in my first year of doing radiotherapy, and I mean it is a lot of work and you do have to study, but after spending the last month in placement it's very rewarding! It's basically a 9-5 job, but yeah, basically depends on your preference!


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    I'm currently applying for the Radiography course. I would think if you are looking for a job you can switch off from that it may be more easily done with a radiography job than the radiotherapy one. Although Radiotherapy is more 9-5 and Radiography can be all hours, there could be more of a bond build between you and patients in radiotherapy as you are constantly seeing them and dealing with their treatment for a period of time and that could be harder to switch off from. Then again, sights you may see in a radiography setting may also stick in your head. On the job prospects, both areas seem quite healthy when looking on the NHS job sites. Spending time at both is a good idea to see which one you would be more suited to. I did the same, before l went l did think radiography might be more for me and going on the shadow days confirmed it for me. Have fun on your visits
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    Ah cool, good luck with everything where have you applied?


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    Im a diagnostic radiographer and love the job. Although things have changed massively since I qualified 6 years ago. The job can be very stressful at times especially working out of hours in a busy trauma centre... although this can also be fun.

    Although Id guess this depends which hospital you work in some places are much quieter than others. As you come into doing your first nights on call post qualification you do actually have a lot of responsibility which is rewarding.

    There is massive change within the NHS at the moment especially as regards our working hours and out of hours pay arrangements under agenda for change. Whereas before you could double your salary by working "on call" this is changing so if your in it for big bucks think again.

    In the right trust though career progression can be fast if you work hard and you can specialise in lots of different areas as there has been a lot of role extension in recent years i.e. reporting/CT/MRI/interventional/Cardiac & cath labs. so as a diagnostic radiographer you do literally come across every patient.

    It definately isn't a "button pushing job" and for trauma patients almost all will require an urgent CT scan to assess their injuries which it is up to you to perform and know which protocol to use to assess the injuries, along with being incharge of the trauma team whilst in the scanner (you definately do make a difference).

    I cannot comment too much on the radiotherapy side but I would say they have a more pre-longed patient contact as they are seeing the same patient several times over. And the hours are generally 9-5 with some emergency cover for cord compressions.

    If you are looking into radiography id definately spend time in both areas before starting a course as the two branches of the profession are actually very different.
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    (Original post by brightonian)
    Im a diagnostic radiographer and love the job. Although things have changed massively since I qualified 6 years ago. The job can be very stressful at times especially working out of hours in a busy trauma centre... although this can also be fun.

    Although Id guess this depends which hospital you work in some places are much quieter than others. As you come into doing your first nights on call post qualification you do actually have a lot of responsibility which is rewarding.

    There is massive change within the NHS at the moment especially as regards our working hours and out of hours pay arrangements under agenda for change. Whereas before you could double your salary by working "on call" this is changing so if your in it for big bucks think again.

    In the right trust though career progression can be fast if you work hard and you can specialise in lots of different areas as there has been a lot of role extension in recent years i.e. reporting/CT/MRI/interventional/Cardiac & cath labs. so as a diagnostic radiographer you do literally come across every patient.

    It definately isn't a "button pushing job" and for trauma patients almost all will require an urgent CT scan to assess their injuries which it is up to you to perform and know which protocol to use to assess the injuries, along with being incharge of the trauma team whilst in the scanner (you definately do make a difference).

    I cannot comment too much on the radiotherapy side but I would say they have a more pre-longed patient contact as they are seeing the same patient several times over. And the hours are generally 9-5 with some emergency cover for cord compressions.

    If you are looking into radiography id definately spend time in both areas before starting a course as the two branches of the profession are actually very different.

    I wish I'd qualified 6 years ago. I'm just graduating this year and it's next to impossible to find a job, it's so grim. But actually just reading your post about the rewarding aspects of it made me remember why I want to do it so thanks for the unintentional pick me up

    Although out of curiosity, may I just ask what's so different now to the way it was 6 years ago?

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Updated: July 10, 2012
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