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EDEXCEL: AS Music UNIT 3 - 21/5/12

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    Hey gang,

    Couldn't find this thread so thought i would start for pre exam discussion of unit 3 (remember no post exam until 4.30am on the 22nd). I am really scared for this exam, I get really hung up about the listening papers and generally only score about 11/16 on each (on a good day) so any tips?

    Also I am working on, and will post on here when they're done, a complete set of contextual (10 mark) answers, ie one for every set work

    S
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    Hi there

    I'm trying to revise the Beethoven set work and I'm finding that there is so much to learn considering we've got two movements!

    Just wondering if you had any tips or revision tools to help?

    Thank youuuu
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    (Original post by samaanthaaah)
    Hi there

    I'm trying to revise the Beethoven set work and I'm finding that there is so much to learn considering we've got two movements!

    Just wondering if you had any tips or revision tools to help?

    Thank youuuu

    Well unfortunately there is only this resource for the Septet, but it is an EXCELLENT resource if you can spare 45 minutes to watch it:

    London Symphony Orchestra Seminar on Beethoven Septet
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    ah that's okay, it's on Beethoven's Symphony no 1 in C major

    thank you anyway!
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    (Original post by samaanthaaah)
    ah that's okay, it's on Beethoven's Symphony no 1 in C major

    thank you anyway!
    Ah I see! Must be a different board!

    ((On an unrelated part I've performed that Beethoven 1 ))
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    OK here it is! The promised 10 mark question answers for the vocal music (I will get instrumental done over the weekend before the exam!!)

    Now please bear in mind that these answers are not exclusive, they are just examples of what you could write, and are the first 10 points that came into my head for each work. Remember these are contextual questions so (almost) anything you can think of is probably worth a mark.

    Anyway, here they are in some convenient spoiler tags.

    My Mother Bids Me Bind my Hair - Haydn

    Spoiler:
    Show

    • Written for solo soprano and piano, often expected for soprano to accompany herself. This is evident in diatonic melody.
    • Melody dominated homophony with some heterophony (allows soprano to easily keep track of melody)
    • Small range (just an octave)
    • Conjunct melody, although some chromaticisim (For why, she cries, sit still, and weep)
    • Classical appogiatura ornamentation (lace my bodice blue) – only hint of melisma.
    • Basic word painting (The village seems asleep or dead) however this does not work second time due to strophic form.
    • Functional harmony with only small amounts of chromaticisim.
    • Every phrase begnins on an anacrusis.
    • Extensive introduction sets key and melody.
    • 6/8 compound duple time.





    Sing We At Pleasure - Weelkes

    Spoiler:
    Show

    • 5 parts, 2 sopranos (quintus and cantus) alto (probaby female), tenor and bass.
    • Fa-la-la refrain (typical of madrigals)
    • Fast, dance like feel (ballett)
    • Mostly imitative counterpoint however there are moments of homonphony, for example 'All shepherds in a ring'
    • Extensive use of imitation, for example first two bars of Quintusimmediately imitated by cantus.
    • Although no key signature it is in G major, however there are still modal influences such as missing F#s suggesting mixolydian mode.
    • Hemiola used at the end of sections (2 feel in 3)
    • All syllabic melody writing.
    • Functional harmony, perfect cadences and prepared suspensions etc.
    • 3 main rhythms in melody (dotted crotchet – quaver – crotchet. Crotchet – crotchet – crotchet. Minim – crotchet)




    Symphony of Psalms - Stravinsky

    Spoiler:
    Show


    • Variety of metres starting in 4/4, going into 2/2 with occasional 3/2 before remaining in 3/2 for the last section of the piece (excluding alleluia coda)
    • Lots of triplets used especially notable at the 'elijahs chariot' section in the flutes and piccolo.
    • Cross rhythms used extensively in 3rd slow section (163) in the timp, piano and harp part where a 4 minim ostianto is played many many times against 3/2 metre.
    • Meody is varied, often using conjunct (Lau-tau-de) and disjunct (Lau-hau-ta-hau-de e-um) passages.
    • Melody is diatonic a lot of the time however stravinsky does extensively utilise chromaticisim in some passages.
    • Mix of syllabic (DOM-IN-NUM) and melismatic (Lau-hau-ta-hau-de e-um) writing in the vocal parts.
    • Non-funcitonal harmony a lot of the time, for example finishing the piece on a C major chord with open fifths.
    • Non prepared dissonance left right and center.
    • Use of interrupted cadences.
    • Tonality does not follow any traditional patterns (eg. Cycle of fifths or relative major etc)




    Honey Don't - Carl Perkins

    Spoiler:
    Show


    • Rockabilly instrumentation; Clean electric lead guitar, acoustic rhythm guitar, drum kit, slap bass, male tenor vocal melody.
    • Slapback echo used on lead guitar (sound is taped and played back fractions of a second later to create artifical reverb)
    • Slap bass is a percussive way of playing where bass strings are plucked by pulling hard away from finger board and letting them snap back.
    • 12 bar blues progression with 8 bar verse and 16 bar chorus.
    • I I I I IV IV I I V IV I I is sometimes replaced with I I vib vib (flattened 6th chord C major).
    • 4/4 simple time but 12/8 compound shuffle feel.
    • One 3/2 bar at 83.
    • Walking bassline in bass often doubled by lead guitar in solo sections (heterophony)
    • Otherwise melody dominated homophony.
    • Improvised instrumental solos and scat.




    A Day in the Life - The Beatles

    Spoiler:
    Show


    • 1960s rock/blues band line up with 2 male vocalists (John Lennon and Paul McCartney but never singing at the same time), acoustic guitar, electric bass guitar and drum kit. However for this song extra instrumentation includes piano and a full orchestra mainly used for transitional sections.
    • Song uses no functional harmony from a cadential point of view but does utilise some common chord progressions such as a cycle of fifths before the final verse.
    • Most of the word setting is syllabic however there are sections of melisma such as the 'turn you ooooooonnnnnnn' line.
    • Studio was used as an instrument in adding effects such as overdubbing the orchestral atonal slide 4 times for a more powerful effect.
    • Modal influence in tonality, for example the song starts in G major however it omits the dominant (D major) chord and use of flattened seventh chord (f major).
    • Most of the melody is disjucnt with many leaps of 3rds and 4ths.
    • Reasonably slow tempo (77bpm) but the straight chrotchet accompaniment with little syncopation allows vocal parts to utilise rubato.
    • Word painting is utilised for example after 'now they know how many holes it takes to fill the albert hall' the piano plays a concerto like figure.
    • Common time with some 2/4 bars in bridge with lots of dotted rhythms.
    • Tonic pedal maintained in piano throughout orchestral slides.






    Phew there we are, hope that helps at least one person!

    S
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    (Original post by Salmonidae)
    OK here it is! The promised 10 mark question answers for the vocal music (I will get instrumental done over the weekend before the exam!!)

    Now please bear in mind that these answers are not exclusive, they are just examples of what you could write, and are the first 10 points that came into my head for each work. Remember these are contextual questions so (almost) anything you can think of is probably worth a mark.

    Anyway, here they are in some convenient spoiler tags.

    My Mother Bids Me Bind my Hair - Haydn

    Spoiler:
    Show

    • Written for solo soprano and piano, often expected for soprano to accompany herself. This is evident in diatonic melody.
    • Melody dominated homophony with some heterophony (allows soprano to easily keep track of melody)
    • Small range (just an octave)
    • Conjunct melody, although some chromaticisim (For why, she cries, sit still, and weep)
    • Classical appogiatura ornamentation (lace my bodice blue) – only hint of melisma.
    • Basic word painting (The village seems asleep or dead) however this does not work second time due to strophic form.
    • Functional harmony with only small amounts of chromaticisim.
    • Every phrase begnins on an anacrusis.
    • Extensive introduction sets key and melody.
    • 6/8 compound duple time.





    Sing We At Pleasure - Weelkes

    Spoiler:
    Show

    • 5 parts, 2 sopranos (quintus and cantus) alto (probaby female), tenor and bass.
    • Fa-la-la refrain (typical of madrigals)
    • Fast, dance like feel (ballett)
    • Mostly imitative counterpoint however there are moments of homonphony, for example 'All shepherds in a ring'
    • Extensive use of imitation, for example first two bars of Quintusimmediately imitated by cantus.
    • Although no key signature it is in G major, however there are still modal influences such as missing F#s suggesting mixolydian mode.
    • Hemiola used at the end of sections (2 feel in 3)
    • All syllabic melody writing.
    • Functional harmony, perfect cadences and prepared suspensions etc.
    • 3 main rhythms in melody (dotted crotchet – quaver – crotchet. Crotchet – crotchet – crotchet. Minim – crotchet)




    Symphony of Psalms - Stravinsky

    Spoiler:
    Show


    • Variety of metres starting in 4/4, going into 2/2 with occasional 3/2 before remaining in 3/2 for the last section of the piece (excluding alleluia coda)
    • Lots of triplets used especially notable at the 'elijahs chariot' section in the flutes and piccolo.
    • Cross rhythms used extensively in 3rd slow section (163) in the timp, piano and harp part where a 4 minim ostianto is played many many times against 3/2 metre.
    • Meody is varied, often using conjunct (Lau-tau-de) and disjunct (Lau-hau-ta-hau-de e-um) passages.
    • Melody is diatonic a lot of the time however stravinsky does extensively utilise chromaticisim in some passages.
    • Mix of syllabic (DOM-IN-NUM) and melismatic (Lau-hau-ta-hau-de e-um) writing in the vocal parts.
    • Non-funcitonal harmony a lot of the time, for example finishing the piece on a C major chord with open fifths.
    • Non prepared dissonance left right and center.
    • Use of interrupted cadences.
    • Tonality does not follow any traditional patterns (eg. Cycle of fifths or relative major etc)




    Honey Don't - Carl Perkins

    Spoiler:
    Show


    • Rockabilly instrumentation; Clean electric lead guitar, acoustic rhythm guitar, drum kit, slap bass, male tenor vocal melody.
    • Slapback echo used on lead guitar (sound is taped and played back fractions of a second later to create artifical reverb)
    • Slap bass is a percussive way of playing where bass strings are plucked by pulling hard away from finger board and letting them snap back.
    • 12 bar blues progression with 8 bar verse and 16 bar chorus.
    • I I I I IV IV I I V IV I I is sometimes replaced with I I vib vib (flattened 6th chord C major).
    • 4/4 simple time but 12/8 compound shuffle feel.
    • One 3/2 bar at 83.
    • Walking bassline in bass often doubled by lead guitar in solo sections (heterophony)
    • Otherwise melody dominated homophony.
    • Improvised instrumental solos and scat.




    A Day in the Life - The Beatles

    Spoiler:
    Show


    • 1960s rock/blues band line up with 2 male vocalists (John Lennon and Paul McCartney but never singing at the same time), acoustic guitar, electric bass guitar and drum kit. However for this song extra instrumentation includes piano and a full orchestra mainly used for transitional sections.
    • Song uses no functional harmony from a cadential point of view but does utilise some common chord progressions such as a cycle of fifths before the final verse.
    • Most of the word setting is syllabic however there are sections of melisma such as the 'turn you ooooooonnnnnnn' line.
    • Studio was used as an instrument in adding effects such as overdubbing the orchestral atonal slide 4 times for a more powerful effect.
    • Modal influence in tonality, for example the song starts in G major however it omits the dominant (D major) chord and use of flattened seventh chord (f major).
    • Most of the melody is disjucnt with many leaps of 3rds and 4ths.
    • Reasonably slow tempo (77bpm) but the straight chrotchet accompaniment with little syncopation allows vocal parts to utilise rubato.
    • Word painting is utilised for example after 'now they know how many holes it takes to fill the albert hall' the piano plays a concerto like figure.
    • Common time with some 2/4 bars in bridge with lots of dotted rhythms.
    • Tonic pedal maintained in piano throughout orchestral slides.






    Phew there we are, hope that helps at least one person!

    S
    These are amazing!! Thank you so much! I find it really hard coming up with stylistic features I'm always a few short

    You don't happen to have any of these for instrumental set works do ya?

    Thanks again!
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    hey guys, I've found the instrumental works easier to memorise essay bullet points for, so have worked mainly on those, and have just been listening to and following the score to revise for the listening question on the vocal works. Here's some of my 10 mark notes for the instrumentals (stylistic features that show it is in the ____ period)

    Corelli:
    • Hemiola bar 27
    • Diatonic/conjunct/triadic melodies
    • Melodies based around first few bars
    • Use of sequences
    • Suspensions, eg double suspension bar 29
    • Functional harmony with cadences
    • 1 chord per beat
    • Modulates to closely related keys
    • Binary form
    • Polarised/Imitative/fugue-like/contrapuntal texture
    • Stretto entries
    • Use of basso continuo


    Beethoven
    • Ornaments
    • Some chromatic melodies
    • Periodic phrasing
    • Sudden dynamic changes
    • Sequences
    • Diatonic harmonies
    • One chord per bar
    • Cadential 6/4 bar 97
    • Use of pedals
    • Use of alberti bass
    • Modulates to closely related keys
    • Sonata form, with slow introduction
    • Melody dominated homophony texture


    Berlioz
    • Chromaticism bar 55/56
    • Solo viola, was uncommon before romantic period
    • Woodwind family is prominent in melody
    • Con sord., ppp, extremes in dynamics
    • Use of idee fixe
    • Diminished 7ths in harmony
    • Use of harmonics in harp
    • Use of crooked horns, wouldn't have been crooked if composed later
    • Unusual choice of instruments, piccolo, harp, cor anglais
    • Programmatic nature


    Schumann
    • Wide range of rhythms - syncopation, running semiquavers, constant triplet quavers
    • Extreme tempo changes in no 11
    • Periodic phrasing
    • Chromaticism in no 11
    • Diminished 7ths in no 1
    • Little/no modulations
    • Rounded binary/rondo form common in romantic period
    • Miniatures/character pieces
    • Use of secondary dominant (dominant of the dominant) in no 11



    Hope this helps! now back to physics... haha
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    Thank you so much! It really helped a lot. I'm doing physics as well lol
    Btw does anyone know what is the grade boundary for music? like approximately, coz I really think that I will fail my listening part.. It's so hard
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    Great we have 10 markers for every set work now.

    (Original post by vivzcly)
    Thank you so much! It really helped a lot. I'm doing physics as well lol
    Btw does anyone know what is the grade boundary for music? like approximately, coz I really think that I will fail my listening part.. It's so hard
    The grade boundaries seem to be pretty close to 80% for A so you're looking at about 54/80 raw. I also struggle with the listening but remember its all on pieces you've studied so things like key changes you probably know/can guess
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    (Original post by SteelScar)
    These are amazing!! Thank you so much! I find it really hard coming up with stylistic features I'm always a few short

    You don't happen to have any of these for instrumental set works do ya?

    Thanks again!

    (Original post by cantstop)
    hey guys, I've found the instrumental works easier to memorise essay bullet points for, so have worked mainly on those, and have just been listening to and following the score to revise for the listening question on the vocal works. Here's some of my 10 mark notes for the instrumentals (stylistic features that show it is in the ____ period)

    Corelli:
    • Hemiola bar 27
    • Diatonic/conjunct/triadic melodies
    • Melodies based around first few bars
    • Use of sequences
    • Suspensions, eg double suspension bar 29
    • Functional harmony with cadences
    • 1 chord per beat
    • Modulates to closely related keys
    • Binary form
    • Polarised/Imitative/fugue-like/contrapuntal texture
    • Stretto entries
    • Use of basso continuo


    Beethoven
    • Ornaments
    • Some chromatic melodies
    • Periodic phrasing
    • Sudden dynamic changes
    • Sequences
    • Diatonic harmonies
    • One chord per bar
    • Cadential 6/4 bar 97
    • Use of pedals
    • Use of alberti bass
    • Modulates to closely related keys
    • Sonata form, with slow introduction
    • Melody dominated homophony texture


    Berlioz
    • Chromaticism bar 55/56
    • Solo viola, was uncommon before romantic period
    • Woodwind family is prominent in melody
    • Con sord., ppp, extremes in dynamics
    • Use of idee fixe
    • Diminished 7ths in harmony
    • Use of harmonics in harp
    • Use of crooked horns, wouldn't have been crooked if composed later
    • Unusual choice of instruments, piccolo, harp, cor anglais
    • Programmatic nature


    Schumann
    • Wide range of rhythms - syncopation, running semiquavers, constant triplet quavers
    • Extreme tempo changes in no 11
    • Periodic phrasing
    • Chromaticism in no 11
    • Diminished 7ths in no 1
    • Little/no modulations
    • Rounded binary/rondo form common in romantic period
    • Miniatures/character pieces
    • Use of secondary dominant (dominant of the dominant) in no 11



    Hope this helps! now back to physics... haha
    I haven't but this kind chap has
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    Why, oh why, do we have to study Symphony of Psalms? It's possibly the worst piece of music I have ever heard.
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    (Original post by samaanthaaah)
    Hi there

    I'm trying to revise the Beethoven set work and I'm finding that there is so much to learn considering we've got two movements!

    Just wondering if you had any tips or revision tools to help?

    Thank youuuu
    I'm quite sure that we have to know just one movement from the Beethoven. Although, it is quite long and has multiple sections- a possible cause of the confusion? The only only set work where we have to know multiple movements is the Schuman.


    (Original post by Reversal)
    Why, oh why, do we have to study Symphony of Psalms? It's possibly the worst piece of music I have ever heard.
    Lol, Stravinsky owns! My favourite!



    I posted this in another thread:

    "For super-detailed notes go to the Edexcel site, click 'teacher support materials' and you will see a highly detailed PDF for each set work: :http://www.edexcel.com/quals/gce/gce...s/default.aspx

    I have just finished making my own condensed notes on each set work. Check them out:https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B_o...Nms2QlJRU19EQQ

    They were written for me, and me alone, but hopefully you will find them useful.

    I have bullet-pointed each set of notes (one bullet point- one mark) and grouped features into those we will be asked about in the comparison question (Melody, texture...). I have five points for each heading. On that question we get asked about two features for two set works. Thus; full marks! Hopefully.....
    "
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    (Original post by Lobz)

    I have just finished making my own condensed notes on each set work. Check them out:https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B_o...Nms2QlJRU19EQQ

    "
    Hey thanks for sharing your notes! The google docs link doesn't seem to be working it just comes up with error 404. Do you mind fixing the link?
    Thanks
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    Stupid Google...

    Here you go: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B_o...Nms2QlJRU19EQQ
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    (Original post by Lobz)
    I have bullet-pointed each set of notes (one bullet point- one mark) and grouped features into those we will be asked about in the comparison question (Melody, texture...). I have five points for each heading. On that question we get asked about two features for two set works. Thus; full marks! Hopefully.....
    "
    I'm in the middle of doing this right now! You're notes are good though, helpful for when I get stuck

    (Original post by Reversal)
    Why, oh why, do we have to study Symphony of Psalms? It's possibly the worst piece of music I have ever heard.
    The great thing about Stravinsky is there are so many easy marks to be had off it
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    I'm just going over notes and practising QU 5 (four-part SATB) now.

    This has got to be my most chilled exam..... It's just those consecutive fifths and octaves that piss me off! LOOL
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    (Original post by Lobz)
    I'm just going over notes and practising QU 5 (four-part SATB) now.

    This has got to be my most chilled exam..... It's just those consecutive fifths and octaves that piss me off! LOOL
    I am the most worried about the listening test, I get pretty inconsistent results on those
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    [QUOTE=Lobz;37630905]I'm quite sure that we have to know just one movement from the Beethoven. Although, it is quite long and has multiple sections- a possible cause of the confusion? The only only set work where we have to know multiple movements is the Schuman.





    My bad! im doing aqa board, ooopss looks like im going to do well on monday.. ahaha
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    (Original post by Lobz)
    I'm just going over notes and practising QU 5 (four-part SATB) now.

    This has got to be my most chilled exam..... It's just those consecutive fifths and octaves that piss me off! LOOL
    I keeep doing that! Its not even the soprano bass ones, its in the alto and tenor -_- GAH.

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