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Gcse Of Mice and Men

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    (Original post by Tplox)
    does anyone know what questions may come up??
    What exam board are you on? Different exam boards have used different themes/characters already.
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    (Original post by own)
    Anyone got igcse edexcel literature on Tuesday?

    Found some notes on injustice on my pc.

    Crooks- Injustice is due to his skin colour, people don’t look past the skin.
    • He’s intelligent- Sad that he lives in a barn, and doesn’t deserve to be so lowly ranked among the men. The fact that he lives in a barn, connotes animal imagery, emphasising how low this rank is (medicine some his some animals). He has academic potential but this is wasted.
    • Admirable because he tries to rise up by reading, admirable as he has self respect/ integrity.
    • He felt the injustice as a child when his father did not want him to play with white kids so that he wouldn’t be hurt by the realisation of racism. This makes him bitter: ‘Nobody goes to heaven’. Also this reminds us that racism is learned rather than right, it’s due to people’s love for power over anything. Shown through Lennie as he comes to talk to him.
    • Crooks is stereotyped because people don’t look beneath the surface (superficial society). Only we see his potential and passion. Steinbeck does not agree with this, shown through Slim (the moral conscience of the book), Slim talks to him, and He calls him ‘Mr Slim’.
    • Beaten by the boss, called ‘crooks’ and ‘nigga’.
    • Bitter due to injustice, torture’s Lennie about George and wants to gain power.
    • The fact that he allows no-one in his room is ironic, it gives him the power which he wants, however simultaneously it drives people away and hurts him. Pride rules Crooks.
    • Apparently an A* point- Steinbeck gives no solution, like it is in real life, emphasising that it is too great a problem in society. Tries to rise up against Curley’s wife however is put straight back down.
    Curley’s wife- Victim of discrimination
    • Men stay away from her, and is called a ‘tart’. She dresses provocatively- Red for danger. This danger due to Curley, and could get them in trouble. ‘Jailbait’.
    • She wants attention, because she is lonely, she dresses up to get this attention but in doing so, drives people away. Tells people she is lonely, and talks to Lennie even though he’s a ‘dum dum’, although this desire for attention is her downfall.
    • Men don’t like her because they can’t have her and don’t want to be sexually frustrated, which is selfish as they view her as a sex object.
    • She is sometimes hard to relate to such as when she says she could get crooks ‘strung up’.
    • Steinbeck doesn’t promote the discrimination, shown through Slim, who calls her ‘good lookin’. And discrimination is learned, shown by Lennie’s not minding her.
    • ‘All the pain from her face was gone’- life was always a struggle, trying to impress people and be seen, showing she is happy in death.
    • Injustice due to her marriage could have been a star but ended up marrying a unloving husband. Shown by the only time we see them together is when she is dead, and Curley is mad possibly because Lennie has taken something which is his. Ownership of women in such times.
    Thankyouuu as well. this has been really helpful!!!! Thankyou so much
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    (Original post by Gomez Hendrix)
    hi..
    what is the exam on tuesday (poetry or of mice and men plus an insector calls)

    also does anybody know a site where i could print off the poems together..i have lost my anthology OOPS!!1

    Im on the board aqa and think that its poetry thursday and of mice and men/inspector calls tuesday.

    Goodluck!

    and not sure about the poems sorrry!
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    (Original post by Gomez Hendrix)
    hi..
    what is the exam on tuesday (poetry or of mice and men plus an insector calls)

    also does anybody know a site where i could print off the poems together..i have lost my anthology OOPS!!1
    Here's the site , i hope you'll find it useful
    http://anthology.aqa.org.uk/index.asp?CurrMenu=12
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    (Original post by MATTTT)
    I have got this exam as well and thanks to whoever started this thread, some really helpful points on here... Also check out this website great for inspector calls and Mice & Men..
    http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/micemen/context.html
    Thanks. I'm doing the same two texts too. Really good stuff!
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    (Original post by cardigansandjeans)
    Wow!! This is really good and really helped me!!! Thankyou soooo much for putting this up, this is amazinggg you are amazingggggg
    Glad to help
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    So is it right to say that the most likey question everyone thinks is gonna come up is CW and Crooks??

    Anyone have awesome notes for slimmm?

    Anyone have notes for AQA poems Relationships closter???

    Thanks!
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    And you people do not do not forget this clever part:

    "the best laid plans of mice and men often go awry"- Scottish poet Robert Burn's poem 'To a Mouse'. Hence the reader technically knows all along that George and Lennie's dream won't come true. The breaking of the dreams is foreshadowed.

    The setting of the Salinas Valley is metaphoric since Salinas in Spanish means solitary. And the loneliness of the men is significantly pivotal to the plot.
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    ^Robert Burns*
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    (Original post by jLou711)
    ^Robert Burns*
    Whoops I started thinking about Robert Browning the poet who I studied at GCSE's. Interestingly i googled Robert Browns who I just googled is a famous botanist who is Scottish.
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    (Original post by sm3lly2ooo)
    So is it right to say that the most likey question everyone thinks is gonna come up is CW and Crooks??

    Anyone have awesome notes for slimmm?

    Anyone have notes for AQA poems Relationships closter???

    Thanks!
    Some Slim quotes with meanings:

    • p. 55-56 "A tall man...a temple dancer". Full description of personality. "Prince of the ranch". Lyrical description.

    • p. 57 "You guys...confidence without demanding it." Good listener. Non-judgemental.

    • p. 57 "Ain't many guys...scared of each other." Comment on friendship. Accepts George and Lennie.

    • p. 64 "Maybe he ain't bright...worker." Judges people on actions.

    • p. 65 "Slim neither encouraged...receptive." Trustworthy. People, e.g George confide in him.

    • p. 66 "...and saw the calm, Godlike eyes...him." Status. Imagery.

    • p. 74 "Candy looked...Slim's opinions were law." Slim is important. Decides about the dog. Men look up to him.

    • p. 77 "Oh! Hello, Crooks...matter." Treats Crooks differently.

    • p. 89-90 "Well you been askin' me...what do you expect me to do about it?" Will defend himself against Curley. Strength.

    • p. 92 "If you don't tell...an' then will you get the laugh." Sorts out situation. Authority over Curley.

    • p. 107 "Guys don't come into a coloured guy's room very much. Nobody been here but Slim." Slim behaves differently. Lack of prejudice?

    • p. 133 "Then Slim went quietly over to her...the spell was broken." Different reaction. Calm language. Use of metaphor to suggest influence on others.

    • p. 134 "Slim sighed. 'Well I guess we got to get to him.'" Sympathetic. Non-judgemental. Tries to divert Curley.

    • p. 148 "Slim came directly...very close to him." Understands. Protects George. Respects him.


    Sorry if the page numbers are off for you, I'm just going off my copy. I've used passages of text rather than a few words so it helps if you've got the text with you. Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by Roshniroxy)
    And you people do not do not forget this clever part:

    "the best laid plans of mice and men often go awry"- Scottish poet Robert Burn's poem 'To a Mouse'. Hence the reader technically knows all along that George and Lennie's dream won't come true. The breaking of the dreams is foreshadowed.

    The setting of the Salinas Valley is metaphoric since Salinas in Spanish means solitary. And the loneliness of the men is significantly pivotal to the plot.
    Sorry, I hate to be picky but Salinas means salty in Spanish and I think you mean Soledad which is solitude. You could however say that the this salty river could represent a river of tears (hence the salty river) which George and Lennie are following; this means that they are constantly on a path of sadness and discontentment.

    They start the book in Soledad (solitude) and the whole cycle is formed since they also end the overlay in solitude as well (the loneliness of George after he killed Lennie). This cycle could link in with the water snake and heron: at the beginning, the water snake escapes the heron but in the final scene the water snake is eaten and replaced by another snake, further exemplifying this cycle of disappointment (supported by Crooks saying "Nobody never gets to heaven").

    I really like your point about the name of the novella though i remember reading that poem and instantly relating it to the book!

    Good luck in your exam
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    (Original post by Dandaman9999)
    Sorry, I hate to be picky but Salinas means salty in Spanish and I think you mean Soledad which is solitude. You could however say that the this salty river could represent a river of tears (hence the salty river) which George and Lennie are following; this means that they are constantly on a path of sadness and discontentment.

    They start the book in Soledad (solitude) and the whole cycle is formed since they also end the overlay in solitude as well (the loneliness of George after he killed Lennie). This cycle could link in with the water snake and heron: at the beginning, the water snake escapes the heron but in the final scene the water snake is eaten and replaced by another snake, further exemplifying this cycle of disappointment (supported by Crooks saying "Nobody never gets to heaven").

    I really like your point about the name of the novella though i remember reading that poem and instantly relating it to the book!

    Good luck in your exam
    I did this exam last year lol, I'm only here to help and yes sorry I totally forgot it was Soledad not Salinas that meant lonely.

    Your point about the snake reminds me that the beginning I forgot what it's called where lennie and geroge are sitting can be seen as a representation of the garden of eden.
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    (Original post by Roshniroxy)
    I did this exam last year lol, I'm only here to help and yes sorry I totally forgot it was Soledad not Salinas that meant lonely.

    Your point about the snake reminds me that the beginning I forgot what it's called where lennie and geroge are sitting can be seen as a representation of the garden of eden.
    Oh right lol never mind and yeah, the bit at the beginning symbolises the Garden of Eden which simply shadows the Dream which George is narrating and is quite unrealistic because of the whole Dust Bowl that occurred. But the imagery of paradise definitely comes up at both ends of the book, when the first and final retellings of the dream are completed
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYYo2BIUOfU&feature=plcp

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmvOA1KnxQU&feature=plcp

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    (Original post by Dandaman9999)
    Oh right lol never mind and yeah, the bit at the beginning symbolises the Garden of Eden which simply shadows the Dream which George is narrating and is quite unrealistic because of the whole Dust Bowl that occurred. But the imagery of paradise definitely comes up at both ends of the book, when the first and final retellings of the dream are completed
    I suppose the snake and the heron symbolism has a touch of irony to it as the snake is supposedly evil with the heron being the symbol for good, however here the heron eats the snake. The snake therefore could be seen as a representation of Lennie as although Lennie did do a 'bad thing' by killing Curley's wife the reader does feel grief. Furthermore I remember Lennie scared the snake away at one point and by that he replaced himself as the prey which creates an ominous sense of foreboding as Lennie is the prey but only a human can prey on a human.

    Again this reminds me of Steinbeck's use of animals to create imagery and foreshadow events which others could mention in their exams- Lennie and the bear is the one that springs to my mind.
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    (Original post by Roshniroxy)
    I suppose the snake and the heron symbolism has a touch of irony to it as the snake is supposedly evil with the heron being the symbol for good, however here the heron eats the snake. The snake therefore could be seen as a representation of Lennie as although Lennie did do a 'bad thing' by killing Curley's wife the reader does feel grief. Furthermore I remember Lennie scared the snake away at one point and by that he replaced himself as the prey which creates an ominous sense of foreboding as Lennie is the prey but only a human can prey on a human.

    Again this reminds me of Steinbeck's use of animals to create imagery and foreshadow events which others could mention in their exams- Lennie and the bear is the one that springs to my mind.
    A very interesting viewpoint!
    The fact Steinbeck compares Lennie to animals such as dogs, bears, coyotes, lions, etc. could obviously because of his largeness and brute strength but could also be because he is George's pet in a way and this wild beast is in captivity under George (which is why he only listens to George when he says "Go get 'im Lennie" when Curley was attacking him). Also, this imagery of animals represents that Lennie is seen as sub-human, firstly because of his incapibility to understand the simplest of issues (being a "dum-dum"), and secondly because he is also incapable of telling the various stages of moral corruption. This lack of understanding of goodness can be seen when Lennie doesn't even realise the difference between killing the small puppy and killing Curley's wife: they are the same to him, just another soft creature he has accidentally killed.
    And obviously the way George 'put Lennie down' also exemplifies Lennie's below-human characteristics: the same way in which somebody would kill their pet to save it from further pain and suffering.
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    (Original post by Dandaman9999)
    A very interesting viewpoint!
    The fact Steinbeck compares Lennie to animals such as dogs, bears, coyotes, lions, etc. could obviously because of his largeness and brute strength but could also be because he is George's pet in a way and this wild beast is in captivity under George (which is why he only listens to George when he says "Go get 'im Lennie" when Curley was attacking him). Also, this imagery of animals represents that Lennie is seen as sub-human, firstly because of his incapibility to understand the simplest of issues (being a "dum-dum"), and secondly because he is also incapable of telling the various stages of moral corruption. This lack of understanding of goodness can be seen when Lennie doesn't even realise the difference between killing the small puppy and killing Curley's wife: they are the same to him, just another soft creature he has accidentally killed.
    And obviously the way George 'put Lennie down' also exemplifies Lennie's below-human characteristics: the same way in which somebody would kill their pet to save it from further pain and suffering.
    Really interesting I suppose I have always been so busy in thinking of Lennie as the symbol of innocence in this cruel ruthless society and his death marking the death of goodness and innocence I never thought about it like that. It is a fair point but I suppose I personally can't imagine thinking of Lennie as sub-human an animal, I go more with the point of view that Lennie is the symbol of innocence but also everyone is capable of changing but Lennie isn't. Lennie does not change unlike everyone else, Lennie stays the same and is persistent with his one dream.

    It is Realism Vs Idealism. Where people like Lennie and Curly's wife are idealists who believe in the American dream whereas the cynics are George, Crooks and Candy who understand that there is no such a thing, in Crooks own words: 'Nobody never gets no land and nobody gets no heaven'. Therefore the death of Lennie and Curly's wife is the death of the American Dream and perhaps all innocence in the american society of the the thirties.

    Lennie is the one who is unchanged- despite the evils he commits he remains pure even in his death.
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    (Original post by Zoelingua)
    What exam board are you on? Different exam boards have used different themes/characters already.

    i am aqa
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    Hey guys, hope your exam went really well (which I'm sure it did) can't wait to see the array of A*s that people will be posting on here in a few months !

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