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Where can I take my Psychology degree?

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    Hello

    I'm in my first year of Psychology, but, unlike others, I have no idea where I'd like to work in the future. I honestly don't think I want to do anything related to Psychology. I'm very interested in Science, Politics and debate, counting Christopher Hitchens, Stephen Fry and Richard Dawkins amongst my heroes.

    I would like a job I really enjoy, one that doesn't feel like work, but more like a hobby, but still with a decent wage. I've tried looking on job websites, but nothing has really caught my eye.

    What would you recommend I do?
    Thanks
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    To the Cleaners
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    To the bank.
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    (Original post by Kasad)
    I would like a job I really enjoy, one that doesn't feel like work, but more like a hobby, but still with a decent wage. I've tried looking on job websites, but nothing has really caught my eye.
    On a more serious note, psychology is quite transferable towards things like Marketing and Human Resources (I'm led to believe).

    Regarding the above quote, not many people find that I'm afraid. You might need to be a little more open to what's available or you might be a long time looking
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    (Original post by Kasad)
    Hello

    I'm in my first year of Psychology, but, unlike others, I have no idea where I'd like to work in the future. I honestly don't think I want to do anything related to Psychology. I'm very interested in Science, Politics and debate, counting Christopher Hitchens, Stephen Fry and Richard Dawkins amongst my heroes.
    Start over at university, this time choosing a degree relevant to what you want to do later?

    (Original post by Kasad)
    I would like a job I really enjoy, one that doesn't feel like work, but more like a hobby, but still with a decent wage.
    Good luck with that.
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    (Original post by chad_bro_chill)
    Start over at university, this time choosing a degree relevant to what you want to do later?
    In regards to that, have I completely ruined my life, so to speak? Some people seem to think any degree is a path to a future job... Are you inferring my Psychology degree will only be useful in getting jobs concerning Psychology? If so, maybe I should change degree...

    The crux of my problem is that I have no idea what I want to do in the future.
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    (Original post by Kasad)
    In regards to that, have I completely ruined my life, so to speak? Some people seem to think any degree is a path to a future job... Are you inferring my Psychology degree will only be useful in getting jobs concerning Psychology? If so, maybe I should change degree...

    The crux of my problem is that I have no idea what I want to do in the future.
    Don't worry, it's not true. Granted, it's not going to walk you into a job, but if you don't know what you want to do then what degree would you switch to anyway? Psychology, as long as you study it at a half decent uni, is the first step towards graduate qualifications that allow you to practice as a Psychologist, but only about 15% of graduates actually do this. It's a transferable degree because it's literate, numerate and teaches you a lot of skills. There are a hell of a lot of jobs out there these days that don't require a particular degree. My advice would just be to spend some time over summer thinking about what you'd like to do as a career, and then start accumulating work experience and knowledge about it. Psychology will only 'ruin your life' if you graduate without any ideas or experience - or you graduate and realise you actually wanted to do medicine or something requiring an equally specific undergrad.
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    (Original post by alexmagpie)
    Don't worry, it's not true. Granted, it's not going to walk you into a job, but if you don't know what you want to do then what degree would you switch to anyway? Psychology, as long as you study it at a half decent uni, is the first step towards graduate qualifications that allow you to practice as a Psychologist, but only about 15% of graduates actually do this. It's a transferable degree because it's literate, numerate and teaches you a lot of skills. There are a hell of a lot of jobs out there these days that don't require a particular degree. My advice would just be to spend some time over summer thinking about what you'd like to do as a career, and then start accumulating work experience and knowledge about it. Psychology will only 'ruin your life' if you graduate without any ideas or experience - or you graduate and realise you actually wanted to do medicine or something requiring an equally specific undergrad.
    Thank you for your kind words, you have improved my mood! I had always hoped it was a transferable degree.

    My problem, as others have told me, is that I have very broad interests, and have been told that "I would be good at whatever I do". While I know this means I wouldn't be good at absolutely everything (Medicine, for example) I do feel I could do a lot of things if I set my mind to it. I think this is the biggest problem I found when moving to study only a single subject at degree.

    What kind of jobs, other than Medicine, would surprise me to find they require a specific degree? It would frustrate me to find I was excluded from a job I wanted to do because of my degree...
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    (Original post by Kasad)
    In regards to that, have I completely ruined my life, so to speak? Some people seem to think any degree is a path to a future job...
    No, you have not ruined your life. It's not as bad as you might think. As the person above me has said, you really need to figure out what you would like to do after uni. It doesn't mean that whatever job you start your career with will dictate how the rest of your life goes, but depending on the industry you decide to go into it might be hard to switch to another field later on. You need to do some deep soul-searching and critical analysis of your interests, what job you would enjoy and the "form" of the job (office, lab, out in the field, in a production plant, service job interacting with customers...). Then get out there and apply to jobs/internships and hope for the best.

    (Original post by Kasad)
    What kind of jobs, other than Medicine, would surprise me to find they require a specific degree? It would frustrate me to find I was excluded from a job I wanted to do because of my degree...
    While it is true that there is a large number of jobs that don't require a specific degree (and therefore you would qualify for these with your Psych degree), there is also a very small number of jobs that DO specifically require a Psych degree (i.e. they don't accept other degrees). So your degree does not really put you at an advantage compared to other applicants, unless you wanted to become a professional psychologist, which you have already said does not interest you.

    Furthermore, there are plenty of jobs that require specific degrees. Medicine, law, dentistry, engineering are the first that come to mind (and I'm sure there are more), but also plenty of science jobs (e.g. chemistry, bio, physics...) and business jobs (e.g. accounting) which are not open to people with arts degrees.
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    (Original post by chad_bro_chill)
    You need to do some deep soul-searching and critical analysis of your interests, what job you would enjoy and the "form" of the job (office, lab, out in the field, in a production plant, service job interacting with customers...). Then get out there and apply to jobs/internships and hope for the best.

    While it is true that there is a large number of jobs that don't require a specific degree (and therefore you would qualify for these with your Psych degree), there is also a very small number of jobs that DO specifically require a Psych degree (i.e. they don't accept other degrees). So your degree does not really put you at an advantage compared to other applicants, unless you wanted to become a professional psychologist, which you have already said does not interest you.

    Furthermore, there are plenty of jobs that require specific degrees. Medicine, law, dentistry, engineering are the first that come to mind (and I'm sure there are more), but also plenty of science jobs (e.g. chemistry, bio, physics...) and business jobs (e.g. accounting) which are not open to people with arts degrees.
    Thanks for your reply. With regards to your first paragraph, what's the best place to research the forms of jobs you speak of? I feel this would give me a better idea of where I'd like to work.

    Slightly confused about your second paragraph, did you mean my degree doesn't put me at a disadvantage?

    While I am interested in the Sciences, I don't feel I could ever just do a single one for the rest of my life...
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    (Original post by Kasad)
    Slightly confused about your second paragraph, did you mean my degree doesn't put me at a disadvantage?
    There is a distinction between the types of jobs: those that don't require a specific degree and those that do.

    Your degree in psychology doesn't put you at a disadvantage for the jobs open to all degrees. But it also doesn't put you at an advantage for jobs requiring a specific degree since you're not interested in the only job that truly requires a psych degree (psychologist).

    Vocational degrees like medicine/law/engineering also don't put you at a disadvantage for jobs open to all degrees. But they DO give you an advantage for the relevant jobs over candidates with other degrees. For example, if 2 people are competing for the same engineering job, the one with the relevant engineering degree will be much more likely to get the job than the other candidate who has a degree in something other than engineering.
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    (Original post by chad_bro_chill)
    There is a distinction between the types of jobs: those that don't require a specific degree and those that do.

    Your degree in psychology doesn't put you at a disadvantage for the jobs open to all degrees. But it also doesn't put you at an advantage for jobs requiring a specific degree since you're not interested in the only job that truly requires a psych degree (psychologist).

    Vocational degrees like medicine/law/engineering also don't put you at a disadvantage for jobs open to all degrees. But they DO give you an advantage for the relevant jobs over candidates with other degrees. For example, if 2 people are competing for the same engineering job, the one with the relevant engineering degree will be much more likely to get the job than the other candidate who has a degree in something other than engineering.
    Ah, that makes sense now! And is good to hear. But puts me in the mindset that, as I'm not doing a degree that requires my specific degree, it's almost pointless? But then I disagree with myself, as I am picking up "transferable skills". My only wonder is if I wouldn't be happier studying another subject... But my above problem stands that I find bits of all subjects rather interesting.
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    (Original post by Kasad)
    But my above problem stands that I find bits of all subjects rather interesting.
    I think that applies to a lot of people, but in the end you just have to pick something you think you will enjoy and see what happens. There is no way to be sure it will be the "right" choice, just trust your instincts. Of course, doing some thinking and research about what will happen AFTER university is also an important step (which I think you might have slightly overlooked) before embarking on a degree.

    I think many students enjoy certain aspects of a broad range of degrees. But you can't spend the rest of your life going to university and studying every single subject which interests you.. That's why you have spare time to pursue other interests. Back when I was 15-16, in addition to chemistry and chemical processes, I was very interested in history and international relations (Cold War was my favorite topic) and also particle physics (CERN particle accelerator and all that) and evolutionary biology (fascinated by Darwin etc..). Now I'm studying chemical engineering which has nothing to do with the last 3 topics I mentioned but that does not mean I've lost interest in those. I keep up to date with what's going on in those fields from time to time, I read newspapers, journal articles, books etc.. My point is you're never going to find a degree subject which encompasses ALL of your academic interests. And that's a good thing, otherwise it would make you a very dull person.

    So either move forward with your psych degree and start figuring out where to go from here OR start over with a degree that more closely matches your interests and will give you opportunities to get the career you want
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    (Original post by chad_bro_chill)
    I think that applies to a lot of people, but in the end you just have to pick something you think you will enjoy and see what happens. There is no way to be sure it will be the "right" choice, just trust your instincts. Of course, doing some thinking and research about what will happen AFTER university is also an important step (which I think you might have slightly overlooked) before embarking on a degree.

    I think many students enjoy certain aspects of a broad range of degrees. But you can't spend the rest of your life going to university and studying every single subject which interests you.. That's why you have spare time to pursue other interests. Back when I was 15-16, in addition to chemistry and chemical processes, I was very interested in history and international relations (Cold War was my favorite topic) and also particle physics (CERN particle accelerator and all that) and evolutionary biology (fascinated by Darwin etc..). Now I'm studying chemical engineering which has nothing to do with the last 3 topics I mentioned but that does not mean I've lost interest in those. I keep up to date with what's going on in those fields from time to time, I read newspapers, journal articles, books etc.. My point is you're never going to find a degree subject which encompasses ALL of your academic interests. And that's a good thing, otherwise it would make you a very dull person.

    So either move forward with your psych degree and start figuring out where to go from here OR start over with a degree that more closely matches your interests and will give you opportunities to get the career you want
    I think you hit the nail on the head when you said I seem to have overlooked it. I intend to do a lot of research and soul searching after these exams are over.
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    What's this about how you can't go into graduate medicine with a psychology degree? I know 2 people that have, and one other who did medicine after a degree in music!
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    (Original post by jennaz77)
    What's this about how you can't go into graduate medicine with a psychology degree? I know 2 people that have, and one other who did medicine after a degree in music!
    Really?
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    (Original post by Kasad)
    Really?
    Yeah lol. Very sure about the psychology cases, although I think the guy with the music degree did some sort of foundation course first.
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    Like so many others you take yourself to the job centre and sign on! IMHO there's no point doing a degree without serious prospects of a job at the end of it.. especially with fees at 9k a year! Moral of the story here? Do your research on the course and the employment prospects before you apply to uni!
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    (Original post by littlemissmidget123)
    Like so many others you take yourself to the job centre and sign on! IMHO there's no point doing a degree without serious prospects of a job at the end of it.. especially with fees at 9k a year! Moral of the story here? Do your research on the course and the employment prospects before you apply to uni!
    Surely when applying for a job they'd always take the person with a decent degree over another with no degree? The employment prospects for Psychology seem pretty broad (or very narrow if you want to do Applied Psychology - but I don't), I made this thread just to check I wasn't limiting my job prospects by taking a Psychology degree.
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    (Original post by Kasad)
    Surely when applying for a job they'd always take the person with a decent degree over another with no degree? The employment prospects for Psychology seem pretty broad (or very narrow if you want to do Applied Psychology - but I don't), I made this thread just to check I wasn't limiting my job prospects by taking a Psychology degree.
    the main problem with psychology seems to be competition.. its a hugely popular subject churning more people out than there are jobs, so you have to be exceptional to get a job right out of uni.. i would start looking for experience over the summer.. even if its not paid

    if i were you i would be doing all i could to make sure that i was the one that employers will pick!

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