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To all the people volunteering at the Olympics...

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    Competition for paid jobs is higher and much stricter. We'll be working alongside those that are getting paid so you can always mention that you took over work from them from time to time. Volunteering shows you are prepared to go the extra mile, even if it means not being paid. Someone looking at your CV will know it's not just about money and you will still have the passion for a job. All things you can mention in an interview. Especially if it's the field that the rest of your CV portrays like me. You can say they hired you for your past skills in the area.

    They want things to run smoothly so it won't be an easy job and you are expected to work hard, another thing you can mention. The paid jobs let you delegate a lot. So you may end up just telling others what to do, something else you can put in your CV. Working in another job and still taking time off to help the community, providing your services to leave a better impression for spectators and tourists.
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    (Original post by Gryffprefect)
    Apologies if that wasn't your intention but I'm getting tired of being bashed on for being a Games Maker.
    Stop referring to yourself by the silly 'Games Maker' moniker then, for a start.
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    'Games Maker'
    Its not a moniker that I would have chosen, but its what we are stuck with, and it could have been worse. Certainly calling it 'silly' is not helpful, it is the correct terminology which we have no control over.
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    (Original post by Gryffprefect)
    My reason is that the role that I've gotten as a Games Maker is 100 times better than any paid role I could have gotten at the Olympics. Most paid roles are in security, catering and cleaning whist I've gotten a Games Maker role on the medical team as first responder. Tell me what role would you rather take?
    And even though you get paid to do the others, the wages are probably nothing to boast about. Anyway, I already live in London and have a full time, well paid job so I why would I want to take time off to do a mundane, rubbish and low wage paid job when I could be a part of history by being a Games Maker.

    In terms of my CV, I think that looking after spectator medical needs would look so much better than cleaning toilets for the two weeks.
    14 pounds per hour is not low wage.
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    I realise I'm coming into this thread a little late, but I want to add some things, because I think many people on here (understandably) are of student-age and therefore are volunteering for a variety of reasons but as has come up the 'it looks good on my CV' thing may be a major factor.

    From my perspective, I'm a teacher, and I'm giving up nearly 3 weeks of my summer holidays in order to volunteer at the Olympics. I'm spending nearly £200 on a campsite for the duration and will spend more than that when it comes to food, etc.

    Why? It's fun OP have you never volunteered? Yeah I could get paid to do it, but then it's a job, and I don't want a job. 1-I don't want a contract and be tied into it,2- I don't want to feel like people think I'm doing the work I'm doing just for the pay - I want to do it because I want to try to make these Olympic Games one of the most memorable for the people who are a part of it.

    I'm a driver, which means I will work face-to-face with all types of people - Olympics committees, athletes, journalists, diplomats, and not just a quick "Hello" and check their ticket, no I'll have them in the back of my car for some period of time, so I'm going to really be able to show them how friendly we are (especially us Geordies ) and hope they have a good time here in the UK

    If you speak to anyone who is volunteering this year who has volunteered at other major sporting events they will all rave about how much fun it is - yes it's demanding work but so what? If you're the type of person who only works hard when you're getting paid then that's your loss, I like to work hard to give a good service, and as I say, help ensure the Games are successful and memorable.

    OP - you have a right to your own opinion, get paid if you like, but please don't throw your toys out of the pram because you can't understand why so many people would do it for free :rolleyes:

    Summary: I can't wait to spend 17 nights in a campsite getting grubby and minging, working 10-hour days ferrying people around in fancy new BMWs and then spending my days off just chilling around the campsite with other Games Makers Paid? No thanks
    1- There are many types of contracts on volunteering. If you want the experience you won't quit. Simple.

    2- There's the problem. Why do you care what people think about you? :rolleyes:
    I like to work hard BUT if I can work hard + getting paid = better.
    I am not throwing my toys out of the pram, my point was that such a commercialised event (whose main reason to exist is profit) has been so successful into getting free workforce by creating a nice story (ever heard of the Bible) where the "spirit" of the Olympic is amazing, etc.
    If Olympics would be a really sport-focused event, then I would understand why people (who like sports) volunteer but it is not. It is nice to work in the Olympics if you like the idea of the Olympic spirit, etc but it is also nice to know that the idea of the Olympic spirit and the like are made out of businesses needs.
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    (Original post by El Torres)
    1-Competition for paid jobs is higher and much stricter. We'll be working alongside those that are getting paid so you can always mention that you took over work from them from time to time. Volunteering shows you are prepared to go the extra mile, even if it means not being paid. Someone looking at your CV will know it's not just about money and you will still have the passion for a job. All things you can mention in an interview. Especially if it's the field that the rest of your CV portrays like me. You can say they hired you for your past skills in the area.

    2- They want things to run smoothly so it won't be an easy job and you are expected to work hard, another thing you can mention. The paid jobs let you delegate a lot. So you may end up just telling others what to do, something else you can put in your CV. Working in another job and still taking time off to help the community, providing your services 3-to leave a better impression for spectators and tourists.
    1- Not really. Thanks to the many volunteers there are so many vacancies that I have applied for several well-paid jobs a month after the deadline, have been interviewed, being offered all the positions I applied for and been able to choose the one I most liked. They are basically taking anyone.

    2- 21st century societies want hard-working people be it in volunteering or not.

    3- Sorry to be so harsh but most spectators and tourists will see so many faces that they won't remember you, they will remember about athletes, places, products but not about the guy who is working his ass for free in a highly stressful event.

    P.S. Some of my friends are actually doing both free (but really worth it, in front of the TV cameras and stuff and not just something no one will notice) and paid jobs. This is the way to go, man. Be passionate, but also be smart.
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    (Original post by Divingbrit)
    Its not a moniker that I would have chosen, but its what we are stuck with, and it could have been worse. Certainly calling it 'silly' is not helpful, it is the correct terminology which we have no control over.
    You realise that Games Maker is a term made to be a boost, right? You are a Games Assistant at maximum, Games Makers are the VIP guys and the sponsors that have put the money for the event.
    But hey, as long as it helps you to perform better, everything is okay.
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    OP, I get where you're coming from. But I think some people have a point in regards to volunteering. If you're not doing it for the money then you must really enjoy it.

    I'm not a volunteering kind of person. I did a couple of positions but I have to withdrawn because I can't keep travel and food expenses going because I'm poor. I always have to give up and look for a paid job
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    (Original post by Chronist)
    1- Not really. Thanks to the many volunteers there are so many vacancies that I have applied for several well-paid jobs a month after the deadline, have been interviewed, being offered all the positions I applied for and been able to choose the one I most liked. They are basically taking anyone.
    OK OK, we get it, you're getting paid for working at the Olympics, well done you! Oh how bad I feel because I'm volunteering, I think I'll quit right now and bow down to how amazing you are and completely accept that you've made the better decision :rolleyes:

    Over the top? Probably, but it is clear you've made this thread to try and 'brag' about the fact that you're being paid when others are volunteering their time. Yawn. I honestly couldn't care less about it, I'm happy to be volunteering my time as it'll be fun

    (Original post by Chronist)
    You realise that Games Maker is a term made to be a boost, right? You are a Games Assistant at maximum, Games Makers are the VIP guys and the sponsors that have put the money for the event.
    But hey, as long as it helps you to perform better, everything is okay.
    You do realise that if the 70,000 volunteers "Games Makers" were not there, the Olympic Games would fall apart? Yes, without sponsorship it wouldn't work either, but the point is is that they've used this name as....yes...a boost...because we are volunteering and we like to feel like we're making a big impact - which we are, if everyone in the country was like you and demanded to be paid, the Games would be hugely more expensive than before.

    Do you actually have a massive chip on your shoulder about Games Makers?

    EDIT: I take it by the neg rep then the answer to that final question is "Yes, yes I do" haha

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Updated: June 11, 2012
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