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    hi, i am intrested and want to learn programming, which one would be the best to start of with for beginners?????
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    I'd say Python or Ruby are good places to start

    Good luck and enjoy
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    I heard people say that HTML or c programming was a good place to start any reason python is good?????
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    (Original post by datta01)
    I heard people say that HTML or c programming was a good place to start any reason python is good?????
    C is also quite a good place to start but I think Python is easier for beginners. Also, just to let you know, HTML isn't a programming language
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    Python is the one I'd recommend, though I started with PHP.
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    I have to learn quickly because my aim is to learn JAVA, can i start java without doing anything else before it???
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    Python is very nice to start with, you tend to see results a little faster and you can focus more on the problem-solving/algorithmic aspect without getting too bogged down in a difficult language
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    (Original post by datta01)
    I have to learn quickly because my aim is to learn JAVA, can i start java without doing anything else before it???
    I tried doing that (learning Java) when I first started programming but I failed miserably Java is hard to learn, so I'd recommend going for an easier language first, just to focus on problem solving and algorithms (as Seanyboy57 suggested) and 'getting into' programming
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    Thanks
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    Another one I'd recommend is BBC Basic, used that for A level computing and now I'm going into C++ a bit, using the online tutorials for that but I'll be understanding more of what's going on.

    EDIT: The hate on bbc basic XD.

    EDIT 2: At least tell me what's so wrong with bbc basic, I know it's simpler than the rest but it's still fun to use and relatively easy to get into.
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    I would recommend c#. Thank me later
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    If you want to get into programming, the honest truth is that it probably doesn't matter too much which language you choose - the real issue is which book you choose to learn it from. A good book will get you programming, and a bad book will cripple you as a programmer. Choose your language, and then look on Amazon for the books with the best reviews. If you search for books published by O'Reilly you will probably find some good ones, they have a good reputation.

    These things said, Java is not tremendously beginner friendly since it is built around some advanced concepts and can often assume that you know things that you might not. For this reason, I would suggest you might like to start with C++ which is a precursor to Java and which lends itself to easing into Java. A lot of people are saying Python, but C++ is much more similar to Java in a lot of ways and so you would probably find the transition easier from that direction.
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    (Original post by datta01)
    I heard people say that HTML or c programming was a good place to start any reason python is good?????
    html is very easy and mixing it in with php and java script in web designing, can be a good start to understanding very basic concepts of java.
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    (Original post by Bobifier)
    If you want to get into programming, the honest truth is that it probably doesn't matter too much which language you choose - the real issue is which book you choose to learn it from. A good book will get you programming, and a bad book will cripple you as a programmer. Choose your language, and then look on Amazon for the books with the best reviews. If you search for books published by O'Reilly you will probably find some good ones, they have a good reputation.

    These things said, Java is not tremendously beginner friendly since it is built around some advanced concepts and can often assume that you know things that you might not. For this reason, I would suggest you might like to start with C++ which is a precursor to Java and which lends itself to easing into Java. A lot of people are saying Python, but C++ is much more similar to Java in a lot of ways and so you would probably find the transition easier from that direction.
    I've never used a book and I currently run a software development firm. I've always found books over-complicating things and expecting you to have some knowledge already.
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    (Original post by pixelfrag)
    I've never used a book and I currently run a software development firm. I've always found books over-complicating things and expecting you to have some knowledge already.
    What type of software do you develop? And how did you learn to develop the software?
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    Java is ok to learn, there are plenty of tutorials online and forums where you can ask for help (like this one ;-) ).

    There's bound to be people around to answer your questions pretty promptly.

    A good resource for Java is the trails from oracle - linky - they're about halfway down & they walk you through some examples quite well.

    Pascal is another good one which was actually designed to be a language used primarily for teaching, it's used in many colleges during a computing A-level. There are again forums & websites to learn from.

    I have found that books tend to be far too expensive and a real bore to learn from - much easier using free online tutorials and just asking for help when you're stuck/have a question.
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    (Original post by non)
    What type of software do you develop? And how did you learn to develop the software?
    I started off by looking at source code of malware actually, following tutorials to build malware from years back (for research purposes ofc) and Visual Studio has this clever feature called intellisense which allows you to explore it's languages very easily. After lots of research, following tutorials, taking software apart, learning how people do things I then started making algorithms for different processes and implementing them with my own knowledge. Two years ago I felt I was proficient enough to start developing my own software for commercial use so I did. I started off with my surveillance tool that you can use to control many pcs remotely at once (www.clientmesh.com)(Programmed in VB.NET) and I made a screencapture tool that let you "snip" areas of your screen and it would automatically upload the image and give you the link you can share. I've also made several free-to use projects, one being a tool for music artists to popularize their music and view other peoples (www.noiserush.com)(Uses HTML/CSS/JavaScript/PHP) (Will remove links if requested, I am not attempting to advertise).

    I looked at a book once, and put it down a few minutes later..just weren't for me
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    Start with Java. Don't bother with python or the C variants, they're too complex for beginners to really succeed in. (Python is too simple)

    Here's what I'd recommend you use to type/compile : http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/pac...-372/indigosr2

    Here's a set of easy to follow beginners' tutorials : http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...8&feature=plcp

    If you have any questions, feel free to ask.
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    Some of it comes down to your environment.

    You have Visual Studio or want to get in a not-so-legal way? C#
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    (Original post by n65uk)
    Some of it comes down to your environment.

    You have Visual Studio or want to get in a not-so-legal way? C#
    C# is not a good choice for beginners. Why bother with the pointless sentence you just wrote? Any fool can tell that it's synonymous for a pirating website, so you may as well have typed that instead.

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