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Programming!

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    (Original post by n65uk)
    Some of it comes down to your environment.

    You have Visual Studio or want to get in a not-so-legal way? C#
    Visual Studio Express C# is both fantastic and free.
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    (Original post by n65uk)
    Some of it comes down to your environment.

    You have Visual Studio or want to get in a not-so-legal way? C#
    Just get the express edition of VS to get it for free basically.
    Edit: woops the person above got there first D:

    (Original post by Inverse)
    C# is not a good choice for beginners. Why bother with the pointless sentence you just wrote? Any fool can tell that it's synonymous for a pirating website, so you may as well have typed that instead.
    IMO It is good for a beginner, it teaches general programming concepts, it's features allow you to progress quickly and the syntax is a good base too. I started off with vb6, then vb.net, then c#. But I'd have been fine starting at c#.
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    The problems on Project Euler are a good way to develop your problem solving / algorithm skills.

    http://projecteuler.net/

    If you are good at maths you should be able to understand the process for solving most of the problems.
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    (Original post by Inverse)
    C# is not a good choice for beginners. Why bother with the pointless sentence you just wrote? Any fool can tell that it's synonymous for a pirating website, so you may as well have typed that instead.
    Visual Studio has an express edition. One may only need to pirate it to get the full edition if required.

    As for whether it's good for beginners - such a sentence is always subjective.
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    (Original post by pixelfrag)
    IMO It is good for a beginner, it teaches general programming concepts, it's features allow you to progress quickly and the syntax is a good base too. I started off with vb6, then vb.net, then c#. But I'd have been fine starting at c#.
    (Original post by n65uk)
    Visual Studio has an express edition. One may only need to pirate it to get the full edition if required.

    As for whether it's good for beginners - such a sentence is always subjective.
    It all depends on a lot of things; but generally speaking, (in my experience) those who have well-regarded programming occupations and have gotten very far with programming and its diverse possibilities started with Java as a majority.
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    (Original post by Inverse)
    It all depends on a lot of things; but generally speaking, (in my experience) those who have well-regarded programming occupations and have gotten very far with programming and its diverse possibilities started with Java as a majority.
    I don't think occupation and success correlates with which programming language you start off with (well occupation possibly since you might be best at the language you start off with) however I think the main thing is the requirement to be able to think logically and reasonably with structure. Then comes the development of algorithms and being able to implement them using the language you choose.

    Whether you choose java or c# isn't too big of a difference when starting off, so you need to look at other things such as the capabilities of the language, the IDEs and etc. Visual Studio is amazing for learning due to the intellisense feature and general layout, netbeans always felt so cluttered as did eclipse for me. I myself tried java at a very young age, didn't like it too much though. Though right now I should probably take it up again, the biggest thing that attracts me is the ease of cross-platform capability.
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    I think mine went something in the order of HTML, Visual Basic .NET, SQL, PHP, CSS, PIC assembly code, Python. I did try learning C but abandoned it before I gained a thorough working knowledge of it. I do think VB is great for beginners - it taught me all of the basic principles of programming and the barrier to entry isn't very high. Don't learn any assembly languages yet, they're a pain!
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    (Original post by pixelfrag)
    I don't think occupation and success correlates with which programming language you start off with (well occupation possibly since you might be best at the language you start off with) however I think the main thing is the requirement to be able to think logically and reasonably with structure. Then comes the development of algorithms and being able to implement them using the language you choose.

    Whether you choose java or c# isn't too big of a difference when starting off, so you need to look at other things such as the capabilities of the language, the IDEs and etc. Visual Studio is amazing for learning due to the intellisense feature and general layout, netbeans always felt so cluttered as did eclipse for me. I myself tried java at a very young age, didn't like it too much though. Though right now I should probably take it up again, the biggest thing that attracts me is the ease of cross-platform capability.
    Quite possibly, although I and many others strongly believe that Java (with Eclipse) is a very convenient and more organised method of learning programming.
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    (Original post by pixelfrag)
    I started off by looking at source code of malware actually, following tutorials to build malware from years back (for research purposes ofc) and Visual Studio has this clever feature called intellisense which allows you to explore it's languages very easily. After lots of research, following tutorials, taking software apart, learning how people do things I then started making algorithms for different processes and implementing them with my own knowledge. Two years ago I felt I was proficient enough to start developing my own software for commercial use so I did. I started off with my surveillance tool that you can use to control many pcs remotely at once (www.clientmesh.com)(Programmed in VB.NET) and I made a screencapture tool that let you "snip" areas of your screen and it would automatically upload the image and give you the link you can share. I've also made several free-to use projects, one being a tool for music artists to popularize their music and view other peoples (www.noiserush.com)(Uses HTML/CSS/JavaScript/PHP) (Will remove links if requested, I am not attempting to advertise).

    I looked at a book once, and put it down a few minutes later..just weren't for me
    I really want to learn how to program software or how to create websites this summer holidays. So what do you think I should try and learn first and which language? Because I'll have lots of spare time and I want to aim to one day create my own business.
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    (Original post by Inverse)
    It all depends on a lot of things; but generally speaking, (in my experience) those who have well-regarded programming occupations and have gotten very far with programming and its diverse possibilities started with Java as a majority.
    This will also depend on what your experience is. For example, if you have not programmed (and programmed well) in the language you will not know how it is, and even then it's only for you personally. You may have found Java easy but somebody in this thread has already said they found Java hard to get to grips with.
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    (Original post by non)
    I really want to learn how to program software or how to create websites this summer holidays. So what do you think I should try and learn first and which language? Because I'll have lots of spare time and I want to aim to one day create my own business.
    Download Visual Basic 2010 Express Edition, google "vb.net tut" and work your way through. Join programming forums and post for help, ideas and look for tutorials.
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    (Original post by n65uk)
    This will also depend on what your experience is. For example, if you have not programmed (and programmed well) in the language you will not know how it is, and even then it's only for you personally. You may have found Java easy but somebody in this thread has already said they found Java hard to get to grips with.
    I'm no professional, but I agree that it's completely subjective; however this thread is asking for advice, and I am simply giving my 2c.
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    - If you want to learn programming for the Web plump for HTML5
    - If you want to learn desktop/enterprise development learn C#

    Simples
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    (Original post by xumanah)
    - If you want to learn programming for the Web plump for HTML5
    - If you want to learn desktop/enterprise development learn C#

    Simples
    Thanks but what do you mean by web plump? Also, is desktop development creating software and enterprise is creating business websites? What do you use java or C++ for? I don't know much about programming.
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    (Original post by n65uk)
    Some of it comes down to your environment.

    You have Visual Studio or want to get in a not-so-legal way? C#
    Students can the latest version of Visual Studio free from Microsoft's DreamSpark programme, why the hell would you pirate it?
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    (Original post by non)
    I really want to learn how to program software or how to create websites this summer holidays. So what do you think I should try and learn first and which language? Because I'll have lots of spare time and I want to aim to one day create my own business.
    I would start with creating websites.
    Why? Because it is a basic place to start, and your work can yield useful results even as a early beginner.

    Neither HTML nor CSS are programming languages, but I would start with them. They will enable you to make good looking, static web pages (you have to type out all the content).

    Once you have done that, you can move to web programming either in JavaScript or PHP, both of which will teach you programming just as well as C#, Java, or C++.

    EDIT:
    If you disagree, that's fine, but can you at least leave a comment explaining why what I said is so horribly incorrect?
    I strongly believe that most people who decide they "want to learn to program" will fail unless they have a useful task they can actually achieve while doing it. Building a website is an easy way of getting useful results, which encourages people to continue.
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    I started on Java for a module in my degree. It's fun, if not just because actually using command prompt makes me feel like an ub3r l33t h4X0r.
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    (Original post by non)
    Thanks but what do you mean by web plump? Also, is desktop development creating software and enterprise is creating business websites? What do you use java or C++ for? I don't know much about programming.
    'plump for' means 'choose'. So the sentence could be written as "If you want to learn programming for the Web then you should choose HTML5".
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    I started with PHP, its ok but not the greatest in the world. If you would like to start with Java then once you get your head around how to layout your code, its pretty straight forward. On a side note I have also never read a physical book, I find them dull and boring. I prefer forums and video tutorials online, its always good to have access to the main docs too
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    I personally would recommend Delphi Pascal. It was my first language. The only problem is it's not that popular, so online tutorials are harder to come by but not impossible to find. I had a proper teacher teach me to program using Delphi though.

    Another good starting language would be Python.

    I'd stay away from C++, C, C# or Java to begin with. C#, C++ and Java all use OOP (well C++ can be procedural), and you should really learn procedural programming and how to program before learning the OOP paradigm. As for C, it will probably be too complicated and in depth to really get anywhere to start with.

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