Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Why are doctors seemingly so incompetent?

Announcements Posted on
Complete this short survey for a chance to win an iPad mini! 22-09-2014
Got a question about Student Finance? Ask the experts this week on TSR! 14-09-2014
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by madders94)
    This! You see the doctors once, maybe twice a day, the nurses are there constantly and they're (usually) always cheerful, friendly but they know what they're doing. There's something about doctors that puts me on edge (maybe the fact that very few of them ever smile and they always have that look on their face like "Am I doing this wrong?"), whereas nurses are always comforting and smiling and put you at ease. The HCAs on the ward I was on were the same - maybe being grumpy and nervous is just a doctor thing
    i got a girl who was clearly a first year doctor who didn't have a clue how to put my IV in, she kept stabbing at my hand, she was rubbish. it was pretty stupid because my veins are huge and pop right out - you couldn't miss them. thankfully a nurse came over and told her to get out of the way, then jabbed it right in.
    i saw 5 doctors and only one of them was proactive at all!
    • 15 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Disclaimer: I respect doctors highly. The title is not literal, it's directed at the several I've seen.

    I've rarely had a successful doctors appointment. They either don't look into anything thoroughly, tell me to live with it or fob me off. Here's some things I've been to them about:

    - I was curious about spots on my foreskin, which were obviously fordyce spots. The doctor told me it was a fungal infection.

    - The same doctor told me nothing could help flat feet, and when I suggested insoles he was like "oh yes that could work"

    - I went to one doctor about my tight foreskin, he said a circumcision is the only option after looking at it when flaccid. It's mild and only tight when erect; circumcision is a last resort. Stretching techniques and steroid cream are viable treatment options, so why tell me I needed an operation? I went to another and she said it will fix itself without looking at it. I'm nearly 19.

    - I have had a constant post-nasal drip for over 2 years which is annoying and always feels like I have a mild cold, in addition to it ruining my voice (I love to sing so obviously wanted it checked out). I was told by another doctor to live with it. It's typically a sign of allergies, it would have been nice to receive advice on that.

    - I have acne scars on my face and back, I brought this up with yet another doctor AND a dermatologist, and they both said absolutely nothing could help scarring. Not laser treatment, not dermabrasion, chemical peels, subscision, fillers or any of the other many treatments effective on different types of scarring.

    - I'm chronically tired and always feel mildly short of breath and get out of breath walking up the stairs, but two different doctors kept saying I'm fit and healthy. I didn't even have a physical. One of the basic things doctors should do, especially if always out of breath and tired.

    - When my Mum took me to a doctor regarding chest pains which seemed to happen when swimming he mentioned asthma, but did nothing about it. A casual "it sounds like it could be asthma" - I'm no expert but something was wrong there too...

    - I've been suffering from what has been diagnosed as depression since 2008, I've seen a counsellor, a psychiatrist and had my meds altered and changed a few times with absolutely no improvement. This one may not be incompetent doctors but surely they would have looked for other causes as my symptoms were unexplainable...

    Fair enough if I went to one and they made a common error, but every time I go to the doctors I feel I may as well have booked an appointment with a carpet cleaner. It has forced me to try and find out what's wrong with me myself which leads people to think I'm OCD or something.

    Would anyone else lose faith in doctors if all they had was disappointing appointments? And do you agree these are bad experiences?
    Perhaps because the doctors we see most regularly - GPs - are the ones least worth putting your faith in. Even with the specialists you get a few lemons.
    • 10 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by madders94)
    My GP is amazing. I went in with something completely different (a rash) and just one symptom he picked up on and it turned out I had a UTI. If I'd left it much longer I could have ended up in hospital. I did actually end up in hospital for it (it didn't clear up and then progressed into a kidney infection that three rounds of antibiotics didn't fight off), but he sorted all that out for me and got me straight onto a ward, advised me on pain medication, done all the tests, didn't just write me off, and is now doing a referral to a specialist and for a scan to try and work out why it hasn't gone yet, and has also offered to send evidence to the exam boards because it's screwed up my exams.

    The doctors in the hospital were different. Tip to any medical students, when you're doing that thing when one of the doctors takes you around all the beds, try not to look at the patient as either some block of meat you want to cut into or some circus freakshow attraction. I've never felt so uncomfortable in my life.

    True. I had eight of them once come charging up to me at 8am. All stood round my bed in a busy ward, only one spoke to me whilst the others all stared. They then took off muttering to each other before one then shouted back "Have you had a bowel movement today Miss Daisydaffodil?"

    Worse was then I had an operation under spinal, turned round and saw a gang of nurses/doctors watching through a glass screen. OK it was a procedure hardly anyone was familiar with - and I had a rare and apparently exciting reaction to a drug - but that didn't mean I wanted random staff having a gander!

    They need to remember they are dealing with humans and not just objects that require fixing!

    Hospital doctors tend to be awful awful people - although my uro consultant is lovely and always holds my hand whilst talking to me.. GPs though are a bit of a mix - my current GP is a lifesaver and don't know what I'd do if I didn't have her at the other end of the phone, others though that I've met have been terrible!
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kka25)
    :mad:

    Would you want my shoe? You can have it and throw it at that incompetent noob.

    :console:

    Thank you :P
    :hugs:
    • 10 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Last time I went to a doctor with a simply query, I left with a broken jaw =/ Damn fool poked me with a needle :-(
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Took my partner 2 years and hundreds of appointments later to get someone to understand what was going on with him.

    I'm sorry but when someone goes to the doctors countless times with testicular pain the doctor would do something about it?? Nope.

    He had to go out and get his own help, he got in contact with the local NHS trust and complained and then got a councillor to get the doctors off their ass and do something about it.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I would say that you get a huge range of doctors. I think sometimes people give GPs flack because they won't tell them what they want to hear. One of these occasions would be a girl that came in when I did work experience at a GP and asked if she could get hair removal on the NHS because it was 'bothering her' and the GP basically said no, explained that her case was extremely minor in the view of the hospital and that if it wasn't causing her any mental turmoil there wasn't much he could say to try and convince them otherwise - she seemed pretty annoyed when she left but what more could he do? I imagine she's gone home like 'oh that doctor was useless he wouldn't help me!'.

    I personally have actually been pretty lucky on the being referred for problems front, unfortunately they've not quite figured out what's wrong with me. I do have one personal complaint though, that a doctor diagnosed me with 'depression' when I was 13 and now it's slapped across my notes, every time I go to the doctor whether it be a chest infection or glandular fever they try and suggest it's related to depression. There was no way in hell I was depressed - it really was hormones and my parents being over zealous and naive.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by M1011)
    Last time I went to a doctor with a simply query, I left with a broken jaw =/ Damn fool poked me with a needle :-(
    A broken jaw from a needle...?


    Though I did once end up bleeding profusely from the ear when an idiot of a GP tried to take my temperature and stabbed the machine in, and then when I got a bit weepy with shock he just sort of handed me some tissues and went "well you've got a fever and the pain probably means it's an ear infection" no, love, the pain is probably you ripping part of my ear open.
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rosee92)
    yes of course it's called hypophosphatasia, it's a genetic disease which is passed through recessive genes, so his parents won't show signs of it. Basically there's not enough phosphorus in the skeleton, which results in weak bones, in young children it seems similar to rickets. No cure, only treatment is getting lots of vitamin d which is the only thing which helps with the pain. As there are different stages (dependent on when it becomes 'visible') it's worth going to see a specialist because they might be able to do more for him. message me if you have any more questions
    His parents were describing exactly the same things as you did, about having pains going up the stairs and such and as soon as I saw your post it hit me instantly. Thank you, I'll pass it on to the boys parents. Poor kid, only 11 and already has these pains :\

    Thanks again!
    • 10 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ohlavelle)
    A broken jaw from a needle...?


    Though I did once end up bleeding profusely from the ear when an idiot of a GP tried to take my temperature and stabbed the machine in, and then when I got a bit weepy with shock he just sort of handed me some tissues and went "well you've got a fever and the pain probably means it's an ear infection" no, love, the pain is probably you ripping part of my ear open.
    It was a blooming big needle... No I jest. I had like 4 vaccinations for a holiday to Egypt and turns out I don't react well with Typhoid. Cue comical black out in the middle of boots
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    The trouble is there are many hyporhondricacts that go to the doctor wanting something wrong with them and being given a prescription is some kind of reward and medal. The truth is:
    For the following there could be many reasons behind it:
    Stomach paiin - menstrual pain, acid indegestion, trapped wind etc
    Headaches- stress,dehydration

    Get my drift
    • 3 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I don't know why but after reading this thread yesterday I booked an appointment with my GP today to discuss some of my symptoms.

    Basically I've done my own research and it's come down to either depression or hypothyroidism and although my councilor suggested I may be depressed a few month back I don't quite feel like I am now. I've had some of the symptoms for well over a year now and some have only appeared in the last six months.

    Anyway, I want to suggest the hypothyroidism/possible depression to my doctor today but I worry that he'll just dismiss me like he's done with the problems beforehand. Do you guys think that mentioning that I've done research etc. will help? How can I get something done? I don't want to be fobbed off again.
    • 7 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Let us know what they say
    I've just got back, and I have to say, the experience was very pleasant. It's worth mentioning, however, that the doctor I saw has a reputation for being incredibly affable, unlike the guy I normally see (who, funnily enough, was being disparaged by two ladies long in the tooth right in front of me).

    Anyway, I was prescribed a long-term course of steroid nasal sprays. I have to use them for around three months or so before being able to tell if they're completely useless or not. I am, of course, an optimist, so I remain confident this will finally rid me of my sinus affliction.
    • 12 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ohlavelle)
    I would say that you get a huge range of doctors. I think sometimes people give GPs flack because they won't tell them what they want to hear.
    I've been accused of this. I went to see a GP in March due to having some hearing problems and she said that it's blocked wax and that my ears should be syringed. That was done and two weeks later, I was still having problems. I was told to come back in 2 months. Not being happy with the response, I went back a few days later and got told off it.:mad:

    I'm sorry; but I get sensory overload, which bloody hurts. What else am I meant to do?:mad:

    For the most part, I have seen some wonderful GPs. I went to see one a few years ago and he said he doesn't know what's wrong. (not reassuring; but better than just chucking medication at me) He decided that I should see a neurologist.

    2 years later, I am still no closer to finding out what's wrong.
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    My friend was hospitalised with some mysterious illness towards the end of last summer. Was ment to be living with him at uni this year but he had to take the year out.

    Over the course of the 3-4 weeks in hospital he was diagnosed with around 8 different diseases by different doctors who'd pay him a 5 minute visit each day. Poor lad was started on treatment for loads of stuff then taken off it when it didn't have any effect.
    • 20 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by daisydaffodil)
    True. I had eight of them once come charging up to me at 8am. All stood round my bed in a busy ward, only one spoke to me whilst the others all stared. They then took off muttering to each other before one then shouted back "Have you had a bowel movement today Miss Daisydaffodil?"

    Worse was then I had an operation under spinal, turned round and saw a gang of nurses/doctors watching through a glass screen. OK it was a procedure hardly anyone was familiar with - and I had a rare and apparently exciting reaction to a drug - but that didn't mean I wanted random staff having a gander!

    They need to remember they are dealing with humans and not just objects that require fixing!

    Hospital doctors tend to be awful awful people - although my uro consultant is lovely and always holds my hand whilst talking to me.. GPs though are a bit of a mix - my current GP is a lifesaver and don't know what I'd do if I didn't have her at the other end of the phone, others though that I've met have been terrible!
    Definitely this. It reminded me of a pack of vultures, at one point I thought they were waiting for me to burst into tears, they looked so excited when I was in pain. I think they should really ask whether you mind having student doctors before they let them come in and just stare at you. I was feeling exposed enough because I was 17 on a ward with people where the youngest was in her 30s and most were in their 60s, and I was scared and alone.

    And yet the student nurses were absolutely brilliant - one spent about 20 minutes sat with me when I was on my own and gave me advice about training to be a midwife, the others were all really lovely. One of the student doctors was brilliant, she couldn't get a cannula in me (I don't think anyone ever will be able to, my veins are terrible) so she didn't bother trying to stick me again and again to try and do it, she knew I was nervous so she prescribed all medication by mouth and just took blood tests the normal way

    So there's always going to be a mix I guess
    • 20 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Another problem I had with a doctor was when I needed more pain medication but my doctor wasn't in so I had to go to another, and despite there being extensive notes from the past month and a half from both my GP and the hospital saying it was pyelonephritis, she said the pain was rib and muscle pain probably from some injury (despite me saying I hadn't injured myself). :facepalm2:
    • 20 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by avéry)
    I don't know why but after reading this thread yesterday I booked an appointment with my GP today to discuss some of my symptoms.

    Basically I've done my own research and it's come down to either depression or hypothyroidism and although my councilor suggested I may be depressed a few month back I don't quite feel like I am now. I've had some of the symptoms for well over a year now and some have only appeared in the last six months.

    Anyway, I want to suggest the hypothyroidism/possible depression to my doctor today but I worry that he'll just dismiss me like he's done with the problems beforehand. Do you guys think that mentioning that I've done research etc. will help? How can I get something done? I don't want to be fobbed off again.
    Take a list of your symptoms and rather than mentioning the research, just say that hypothyroidism has been mentioned to you and you're concerned, and would they be able to do anything just to rule it out to put your mind at ease? Then you'll know if it's hypothyroidism or not, and if it isn't then talk about the depression. If they write you off, try again with another doctor, another practice, anything.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Given a list of symptoms I think computers are already better at general diagnosis than the average doctor. People are scared of technology though so ho hum.
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AlmostChicGeek)
    Hey!

    I know right? It really insane. My new doctor is better - he is young and new so I think that may be why. When I went to see him when I was considering going private he was so lovely, and I was so upset, so that helped a lot.

    I would try a new doc if you can - one will eventually listen (I hope!).

    Have you finally got treatment now?

    And yeah I know, my first doc was pissed off that I had researched - I printed some stuff off the internet - but they weren't helping so I tried to help myself.

    I'm lucky I know a few people that have it, so they could give me some advice. I think it would be a good idea to join a community, it can be really hard going it alone!

    I mean it was so hurtful when one doctor was like 'I can't believe you are in as much pain as you say you are' basically just not believing me at all. You start to wonder if you are just going to have to live in pain forever!

    I was kinda glad they found some, in a petty way, just to prove to them I hadn't been lying!
    Yeah, my GP was eventually brilliant and I'm seeing a rather well-known gyno in the endo field (after being treated like crap by my local hospital's gyno department and my GP kicking up a fuss and having me referred to a much better hospital). I think half the battle with chronic illness is getting someone who will listen and understand, because once that happens it's amazing how much better you feel!
    (It's also amazing how many non-specialised doctors (even gynos) still believe the old endo myths.)
    Do you use any online groups? Because endo-resolved.proboards.com is one of the best I've come across (not too whiny and a real 'community' feel).
    R.e. Pain- I think that Endo girls/women are so hardcore with their pain management that doctors just disbelieve how mucbh pain we can deal with. I know that most of the pain that I now deal with is something that I never would have been able to live with a few years ago... I now have an amazing tolerance to pain and ability to grin and bear it.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: June 5, 2012
New on TSR

TSR Freshers' blogs 2014

Read what TSR's freshers have to say as they head off to uni

Article updates
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.