Bring Back the 11 plus?


    Rep:
    I don't know if any of you know what the 11+ is, but it's the old education system which was abolished about 35 years ago.
    You took an exam in Year 6 which would determine which secondary school you went to, whether that be a grammar school (for the bright students) or a secondary modern (for the less able). This would mean that those who were bright at this age effectively got a better education than those who were not and the secondary modern students would receive a more practical education.
    There are several arguments for and against the system as it has been news recently about a possible return.
    Mainly people are against it as it does not give people of that age equal chances, and if you flunk the test but are actually clever then you wouldn't have another chance again.
    However, people like the idea as it takes away the private school system and bright children of all backgrounds can receive a very good education, regardless of their parents income or relying on scholarships which are sometimes far and few between.
    Anyway, I'd love to hear your views.

    Rep:
    It's still around :confused:

    And in reply to :
    regardless of their parents income or relying on scholarships which are sometimes far and few between.
    Most successful 11+ students have benefitted from private tuition in some form , something that parents on poor income would struggle to afford on a regular basis. Unless of course their parents are educated themselves to teach their child through the process.

    Rep:
    I took the 11 plus?

    Rep:
    I took it?

    Rep:
    The 11+ is definitely still around- albeit only in counties that still have grammar schools (so I believe).

    Rep:
    We didn't have to take it but that was because we're in Wales where there aren't grammar schools.

    Rep:
    11 plus is still around as others have said...

    Rep:
    (Original post by madders94)
    We didn't have to take it but that was because we're in Wales where there aren't grammar schools.



    (Original post by thompsonic7)
    The 11+ is definitely still around- albeit only in counties that still have grammar schools (so I believe).
    I didn't take it and I've lived in England; namely Warwickshire since I was born

    Rep:
    I took it

    Rep:
    (Original post by desijut)
    11 plus is still around as others have said...
    Good thing you said it again then.

    Rep:
    It's not around at the moment per se, since nowadays you apply to any grammar schools and take their individual tests, rather than the mass testing of the 1960s - so those people who say they took it.... you didn't really

    Rep:
    (Original post by Tulian)
    Most successful 11+ students have benefitted from private tuition in some form , something that parents on poor income would struggle to afford on a regular basis. Unless of course their parents are educated themselves to teach their child through the process.
    I know you said 'most', but at my school very few students get tutored through. It's not in the most affluent area, which is possibly why, but I personally don't know anyone who received tutoring to pass. I haven't ever been tutored to be honest. My mum helped me work through practice papers perfectly fine and her highest qualifications are GCSEs (I don't know exactly what you meant by that last sentence) :dontknow:

    Rep:
    11-12 is too young to be fretting about serious exams that may decide the rest of your future. You get enough of that through the rest of your life.

    Rep:
    I am against the 11+ exam and the concept of Grammar v Secondary Modern Schools in general, as like many have said above, it is too much of a life changing event to have your future cemented by how you perform at an exam at the age of 11.

    I do believe in flexible streaming though in the same school system, were children of different abilities can be streamed to either stretch or support them were necessary, and all get a decent education, and can even move between streams as they develop.

    Rep:
    (Original post by Holmeboy)
    I am against the 11+ exam and the concept of Grammar v Secondary Modern Schools in general, as like many have said above, it is too much of a life changing event to have your future cemented by how you perform at an exam at the age of 11.

    I do believe in flexible streaming though in the same school system, were children of different abilities can be streamed to either stretch or support them were necessary, and all get a decent education, and can even move between streams as they develop.
    That'll never happen, its far too sensible.

    Rep:
    I went through this process.

    Splitting kids up at 11 for different educations is the biggest load of horse crap going.

    Elitist education is very hard to justify.

    Rep:
    (Original post by Holmeboy)
    I am against the 11+ exam and the concept of Grammar v Secondary Modern Schools in general, as like many have said above, it is too much of a life changing event to have your future cemented by how you perform at an exam at the age of 11.

    I do believe in flexible streaming though in the same school system, were children of different abilities can be streamed to either stretch or support them were necessary, and all get a decent education, and can even move between streams as they develop.
    I think grammar schools are a good idea. The atmosphere generally encourages higher levels of academic achievement and it can help bring out the best in people.

    You argue that 11 is too young an age to be put into a life-changing situation like this. If going to a grammar school really is that big of a benefit, why would you try and prevent them from existing?

    The fact is that for the 11+ you are competing with your peer group so I do think it is a fair test. I know that some people get private tuition for the 11+, but that ends up cheaper than sending your kids to private schools (which many see as the alternative way of getting a good education). Besides, many schools do help with 11+ preparation and there is always an element of inequality and unfairness in everything. I think grammar schools give low income families a way of sending children to good schools. In that respect, grammar schools allow for a more meritocratic approach to education.

    If you really believe that at 11 someone is too young, there is an equivalent entry test to the 11+ for people in Year 8 (and there's also one for sixth form entry) so they can transfer into grammar school for Year 9.

    Taking this argument to the extremes, it's kind of like arguing that the university admissions process shouldn't be based on our grades.

    Rep:
    (Original post by heyAmy)
    I don't know if any of you know what the 11+ is, but it's the old education system which was abolished about 35 years ago.
    You took an exam in Year 6 which would determine which secondary school you went to, whether that be a grammar school (for the bright students) or a secondary modern (for the less able). This would mean that those who were bright at this age effectively got a better education than those who were not and the secondary modern students would receive a more practical education.
    There are several arguments for and against the system as it has been news recently about a possible return.
    Mainly people are against it as it does not give people of that age equal chances, and if you flunk the test but are actually clever then you wouldn't have another chance again.
    However, people like the idea as it takes away the private school system and bright children of all backgrounds can receive a very good education, regardless of their parents income or relying on scholarships which are sometimes far and few between.
    Anyway, I'd love to hear your views.
    The 11+ (and the tripartite system) is still around in some areas, including mine.

    Rep:
    (Original post by madders94)
    We didn't have to take it but that was because we're in Wales where there aren't grammar schools.
    WALES rhymes with FAILS.

    Rep:
    I took the 11+ in year 9 to move to a grammar school. I obviously had quite a few marks deducted for my age. I don't think people realise if they didn't do the 11+ there is still a chance to go to a selective school, most of my friends could have easily gotten in but didn't want to try. Plus my parents did all 3 of our verbal reasoning practice and although my older brother failed (and ended up going to a private school) my younger brother will be joining me at the grammar school next year

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: June 4, 2012

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