Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Another squat form check thread

Announcements Posted on
    • Thread Starter
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Thanks to everyone who commented on my last thread! I tried to incorporate a lot of the advice given into my squat and I took some more videos from a training session yesterday.

    You can find the other thread here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...php?p=37761606


    In my new video, I dropped the weight down to 100kg and I've included a set from the side to check on depth.

    I'd appreciate it if anyone could give me some more tips on how to make it better.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8C3Jz2UND0
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Your depth is better now, doesn't look like a leg press either.

    Your knees are still not tracking over your toes - bring your feet in a little more.
    • 13 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    grip still too wide, stance a touch too wide still, knees not quite tracking over toes - your toes need to be turned out about 5 degrees less, and you need to narrow it a tiny bit. Depth is better but you're just hitting parallel and you dive bomb it - control it on the way down - the eccentric portion is important too.

    From the side on view, you're also breaking at the knees first, instead of the hips.
    Attached Thumbnails
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	yoursquat.png 
Views:	93 
Size:	128.9 KB 
ID:	152990  
    • 8 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I'm no expert at squats but you're too wide. Your thighs/knees pointed one way and your toes another. Excellent pic by HFerguson.

    Also you aren't controlling it.

    From the side you don't quite look like you're sitting in to it? Your knees are gonna have too much strain on them. What I do/have done is pick up the bar only and go right down to the ankle to find your natural position (if you're ankles are flexible enough). That's a squat. It shouldn't be majorly different with weights. If you're finding a big difference, most likely your balance is messed up because you're going too heavy too quick.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Erm, a FYI @ the experts above my post.

    Wide grip on squats adds stability. if you dont understand this concept, feel free to stop posting advice.

    Also, same goes for the stance. You do not have your legs pointing forwards, you have them pointing outwards to get ALL of the muscle in your legs firing.

    It is a squat, not an up-down motion.
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HARRY PUTAH)
    Erm, a FYI @ the experts above my post.

    Wide grip on squats adds stability. if you dont understand this concept, feel free to stop posting advice.

    Also, same goes for the stance. You do not have your legs pointing forwards, you have them pointing outwards to get ALL of the muscle in your legs firing.

    It is a squat, not an up-down motion.
    Closer grip is more stable since it forces the upper back to be tighter, probably more than you would be able to voluntarily contract it with a wide grip. But close grip and tight shoulders do not agree at all..
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    The only thing I'm picking up on is the fact that your feet seem angled out a little more than you'd like for a narrow stance squat. But my understanding of olympic style squats is pretty limited anyway.
    • Thread Starter
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HARRY PUTAH)
    Erm, a FYI @ the experts above my post.

    Wide grip on squats adds stability. if you dont understand this concept, feel free to stop posting advice.

    Also, same goes for the stance. You do not have your legs pointing forwards, you have them pointing outwards to get ALL of the muscle in your legs firing.

    It is a squat, not an up-down motion.
    Ya, I don't know why people have negged you, but I find slightly outwards feet/a wide stance gives me a better base to push from and is just generally more comfortable too.



    (Original post by silent ninja)
    I'm no expert at squats but you're too wide. Your thighs/knees pointed one way and your toes another. Excellent pic by HFerguson.

    Also you aren't controlling it.

    From the side you don't quite look like you're sitting in to it? Your knees are gonna have too much strain on them. What I do/have done is pick up the bar only and go right down to the ankle to find your natural position (if you're ankles are flexible enough). That's a squat. It shouldn't be majorly different with weights. If you're finding a big difference, most likely your balance is messed up because you're going too heavy too quick.
    My natural full squat position doesn't have a neutral spine, so with any sort of load that probably wouldn't end too well. I think it might have something to do with hamstring flexibility.

    But otherwise, my body tends to follow the same line with a weight and without, as in, my knees tend to be ahead of my ankles even without any weight just to maintain balance. From watching some olympic lifters, their knees seem to be pretty far forward too - I understand it's putting more strain on the knees, but how bad is it actually?



    (Original post by HFerguson)
    grip still too wide, stance a touch too wide still, knees not quite tracking over toes - your toes need to be turned out about 5 degrees less, and you need to narrow it a tiny bit. Depth is better but you're just hitting parallel and you dive bomb it - control it on the way down - the eccentric portion is important too.

    From the side on view, you're also breaking at the knees first, instead of the hips.

    The thing with the foot angle is that I find if my feet point forwards too much, my knees tend to cave in more and there is more of a lack of balance...

    But yeah, I'll try and go down a little more controlled.

    This may sound like a stupid question, but how do I break at the hips first?
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LookIt'sPete)
    This may sound like a stupid question, but how do I break at the hips first?
    The best cue is push your hips backwards without bending your knees, like you're about to do a good morning.
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    The width of your squat is fine – that’s a pretty normal stance for a squat.

    The reason the knees are folding in is when you allow the weight to drop you at the bottom of the squat your hips roll under you – this causes the knees to flex inwards.

    Control the weight more, lower yourself by pushing the hips back and forcing the knees out, weight on outside and heel of foot. When you reach a point where your hips would ‘roll’ under you – stop and come back up.
    Even if it doesn’t quite hit depth you will develop the flexibility through squatting to do it (doesn’t hurt to add a few other stretches in too).

    Aside that it isn’t a bad starting point at all.
    • Thread Starter
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    The width of your squat is fine – that’s a pretty normal stance for a squat.

    The reason the knees are folding in is when you allow the weight to drop you at the bottom of the squat your hips roll under you – this causes the knees to flex inwards.

    Control the weight more, lower yourself by pushing the hips back and forcing the knees out, weight on outside and heel of foot. When you reach a point where your hips would ‘roll’ under you – stop and come back up.
    Even if it doesn’t quite hit depth you will develop the flexibility through squatting to do it (doesn’t hurt to add a few other stretches in too).

    Aside that it isn’t a bad starting point at all.
    Ah cheers for the advice. Yeah, when I look in a side mirror, I can see my hips coming under after a certain point, but that's not quite at a parallel level... If you look at my other video, that's about where I stop and then come back up. Do you think it would be best to try and get more depth now (like in this video) or would it be best to continue with my old style and working on th flexibility slowly?

    Also, what is your opinion on foot angle?
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LookIt'sPete)
    Ah cheers for the advice. Yeah, when I look in a side mirror, I can see my hips coming under after a certain point, but that's not quite at a parallel level... If you look at my other video, that's about where I stop and then come back up. Do you think it would be best to try and get more depth now (like in this video) or would it be best to continue with my old style and working on th flexibility slowly?

    Also, what is your opinion on foot angle?
    Old style and work on flexibility - forcing depth never works.

    Whatever suits you, some people have them straight, some angled out - it's an indavidual thing.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    From watching some olympic lifters, their knees seem to be pretty far forward too - I understand it's putting more strain on the knees, but how bad is it actually?
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	front-vs-back[1].jpg 
Views:	32 
Size:	26.0 KB 
ID:	153179

    People don't hurt their knees because the knees go past the toes, as the Olympic lifters demonstrate. What will hurt your knees is letting the bar shift forwards of the midfoot.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Don't understand why people are saying his feet are too angled and stance too wide. It's a squat, not a leg press, you need the wide stance to get into the hole.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    The best advice for squatting i have ever had is to pretend you are a bear taking s **** in the woods, at this position you are at you most comfortable and your feel should be in the optimal position to suit YOU.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Also, whilst driving up you are using you back too much, drive form the heels through your gluteus and finally through your hip to improve the strength in you hip thrusters. Other than that looking good. Don't listen to the people who say your legs are too far apart and toes too angled, for feet must be angled to avoid injury and to add support. Legs must be wide because you are going below parallel and more strain is put on the ankles, knees and hips. A wide stance is needed when going low due to lack of flexibility in ankles, knees and hips.
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    If you're hitting depth, your toes are angled out in the first place and the knees track over your toes, I don't see why it matters so much how wide your stance is or how far out your toes are. Within reason ofc.
    • 13 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HARRY PUTAH)
    Erm, a FYI @ the experts above my post.

    Wide grip on squats adds stability. if you dont understand this concept, feel free to stop posting advice.

    Also, same goes for the stance. You do not have your legs pointing forwards, you have them pointing outwards to get ALL of the muscle in your legs firing.

    It is a squat, not an up-down motion.
    I'd have to disagree about the grip width, narrower = tighter upper back, better bar shelf, or at least that's what I've heard countless times and seem to find works best for me, but I'm happy to be corrected on this?


    (Original post by tooosh)
    If you're hitting depth, your toes are angled out in the first place and the knees track over your toes, I don't see why it matters so much how wide your stance is or how far out your toes are. Within reason ofc.
    if stance is too wide, knees will never truly track with toes and more torsional force on the knee joint. You have to have a level of groin flexibility and external rotator strength to ensure knees and toes track perfectly. If people don't have that external rotator strength or mind-muscle connection/don't know how to consciously activate external rotators (which can be difficult coming out of the hole), they will compensate at the knee joint and the femur will internally rotate, rather than the femur being externally rotated.
    • Thread Starter
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Man, so much contrasting information

    Just out of interest, to the people giving advice, what level would you say you are? Both in terms of experience/technique, and raw weight that you can lift.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LookIt'sPete)
    Man, so much contrasting information

    Just out of interest, to the people giving advice, what level would you say you are? Both in terms of experience/technique, and raw weight that you can lift.
    Cant agree more

    To be fair well done to you, your depth is actually a squat rather then a silly little down and up

    watch these guys
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GtPN-...6689AD6ACB3871

    Good Luck

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: June 3, 2012
New on TSR

GCSE mocks revision

Talk study tips this weekend

Article updates
Useful resources

Articles:

Exercise tipsNutrition advice

Quick link:

Unanswered fitness threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.