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GIANT WR QUOTE LIST For AQA A2 Love Through The Ages Exam 20.06.2012

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    I haven't yet seen a thread collecting together wider reading quotes for the AQA LITA3 exam (on the theme of 'Love Through The Ages' on the 20th June 2012, so I thought I'd start one for revision purposes. Add in your wider reading quotes, with a few details such as date, title, author, relevant theme/plot details/ context etc if you can/ want to. Thank you and good luck for the exam!

    ROMANTIC/PASSIONATE LOVE
    "Romantic love has been diluted into paperback form and has sold thousands and millions of copies" p.165 ORANGES ARE NOT THE ONLY FRUIT, Jeanette Winterson
    "Excellent wretch! perdition catch my soul/ But I do love thee! and when I love thee not / Chaos is come again." l.3.3.90-3 OTHELLO, William Shakespeare
    "As he held her and tasted her, and as she curved in further and further toward him, with her own lips, new to herself, drowned and engulfed in love, yet solaced and triumphant, he was thankful to have an existence at all, if only as a reflection in her wet eyes." TENDER IS THE NIGHT, F.Scott Fitzgerald.

    LOVE & GENDER
    “…men were for that, beam and idea, girder and logarithm; but somehow Dick and Nicole had become one and equal, not apposite and complementary; she was Dick too, the drought in the marrow of his bones.” p.209 TENDER IS THE NIGHT, F.Scott Fitzgerald
    "I would cross seas and suffer sunstroke and give away all I have, but not for a man, because they want to be the destroyer and never be destroyed." p.165 ORANGES ARE NOT THE ONLY FRUIT, Jeanette Winterson

    TRANSGRESSIVE LOVE
    "... an old black ram is tupping your white ewe" l.1.1.87 OTHELLO, William Shakespeare
    "would dream of allowing our only daughter... ...to marry into a cloak-room, and form an alliance with a parcel." THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST, Oscar Wilde
    "...that I loved the wrong sort of people. Right sort of people in every respect except this one; romantic love for another woman was a sin." p.125 ORANGES ARE NOT THE ONLY FRUIT, Jeanette Winterson
    "Such leaps across boundaries were the stuff of daily romance." p.38 ATONEMENT, Ian McEwan

    PARENTAL/ FAMILIAL LOVE
    "My noble father/ I do perceive here a divided duty./ To you I am bound for life and education" l.1.3.180 OTHELLO, William Shakespeare

    LOVE & MARRIAGE
    "Even being lied to constantly, though hardly like love, was sustained attention; he must care about her to fabricate so elaborately and over such a long stretch of time. His deceit was a form of tribute to the importance of their marriage." p.148 ATONEMENT, Ian McEwan

    I'll add more as I come across them in my revision. Feel free to include additional themes!

    Poetry WR notes; Click image for larger version. 

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    (Original post by PhysicsGirl)
    I haven't yet seen a thread collecting together wider reading quotes for the AQA LITA3 exam (on the theme of 'Love Through The Ages' on the 20th June 2012, so I thought I'd start one for revision purposes. Add in your wider reading quotes, with a few details such as date, title, author, relevant theme/plot details/ context etc if you can/ want to. Thank you and good luck for the exam!

    ROMANTIC/PASSIONATE LOVE
    "Romantic love has been diluted into paperback form and has sold thousands and millions of copies" p.165 ORANGES ARE NOT THE ONLY FRUIT, Jeanette Winterson
    "Excellent wretch! perdition catch my soul/ But I do love thee! and when I love thee not / Chaos is come again." l.3.3.90-3 OTHELLO, William Shakespeare
    "As he held her and tasted her, and as she curved in further and further toward him, with her own lips, new to herself, drowned and engulfed in love, yet solaced and triumphant, he was thankful to have an existence at all, if only as a reflection in her wet eyes." TENDER IS THE NIGHT, F.Scott Fitzgerald.

    LOVE & GENDER
    “…men were for that, beam and idea, girder and logarithm; but somehow Dick and Nicole had become one and equal, not apposite and complementary; she was Dick too, the drought in the marrow of his bones.” p.209 TENDER IS THE NIGHT, F.Scott Fitzgerald
    "I would cross seas and suffer sunstroke and give away all I have, but not for a man, because they want to be the destroyer and never be destroyed." p.165 ORANGES ARE NOT THE ONLY FRUIT, Jeanette Winterson

    TRANSGRESSIVE LOVE
    "... an old black ram is tupping your white ewe" l.1.1.87 OTHELLO, William Shakespeare
    "would dream of allowing our only daughter... ...to marry into a cloak-room, and form an alliance with a parcel." THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST, Oscar Wilde
    "...that I loved the wrong sort of people. Right sort of people in every respect except this one; romantic love for another woman was a sin." p.125 ORANGES ARE NOT THE ONLY FRUIT, Jeanette Winterson
    "Such leaps across boundaries were the stuff of daily romance." p.38 ATONEMENT, Ian McEwan

    PARENTAL/ FAMILIAL LOVE
    "My noble father/ I do perceive here a divided duty./ To you I am bound for life and education" l.1.3.180 OTHELLO, William Shakespeare

    LOVE & MARRIAGE
    "Even being lied to constantly, though hardly like love, was sustained attention; he must care about her to fabricate so elaborately and over such a long stretch of time. His deceit was a form of tribute to the importance of their marriage." p.148 ATONEMENT, Ian McEwan

    I'll add more as I come across them in my revision. Feel free to include additional themes!
    Your list is fabulous, but I noticed that you have stuck to certain texts as opposed to flying off and using every piece of literature. I am just asking if you find this more beneficial, at the moment I am confused with my own revision
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    (Original post by KHagan17)
    Your list is fabulous, but I noticed that you have stuck to certain texts as opposed to flying off and using every piece of literature. I am just asking if you find this more beneficial, at the moment I am confused with my own revision
    I know exactly what you mean! I'm now thinking it would be better to focus on a select few pieces- I have so much, it's now become a struggle to sort through them all!

    Your list is great! I find Jeannette Winterson to be very useful in making links etc.. I have not read the novel you refer to, but 'Written on the body'.

    I'll include a few of my quotes here:

    Betrayal/affairs:

    " Oddly, your hands should be full with all that taking but when you open them there's nothing there. " Written on the body, Jeanette Winterson

    "in a marital bed, the tarnished spoon of your body
    stirring betrayal, your heart over-ripe at the core." Carol Ann Duffy, Adultery

    Marriage:

    “how painful and humiliating it would be for Torvald, with his manly independence, to know that he owed me anything!”Henrik Ibsen, A Doll's House (play)

    Charles hopes to “have Ernestina in his bank and in his bed…and of course in his heart, too.” The French Lieutenant's Woman, Fowles ( parody of a Victorian novel)

    * I was just wondering how you were sifting through you wider reading/ how you choose which ones to learn?! I can't wait for this exam to be over. Also, how much emphasis are you placing on criticisms i.e: Marxist, Feminist? Thank you
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    (Original post by KHagan17)
    Your list is fabulous, but I noticed that you have stuck to certain texts as opposed to flying off and using every piece of literature. I am just asking if you find this more beneficial, at the moment I am confused with my own revision
    It depends on the kind of points you like to make in your exam essays. Obviously, the broader your wider reading, the easier you'll find it to make connections, but I tend to go for depth more, simply because I find it easier to go into detail on a few, carefully chosen texts than range briefly through a wide choice of texts; it suits my writing style more. It really depends on how you write and also how much WR you can hold in your head; I'm okay at memorizing the quotes, but I quickly forget the extra details if I try to learn too many! :-)
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    (Original post by PhysicsGirl)
    It depends on the kind of points you like to make in your exam essays. Obviously, the broader your wider reading, the easier you'll find it to make connections, but I tend to go for depth more, simply because I find it easier to go into detail on a few, carefully chosen texts than range briefly through a wide choice of texts; it suits my writing style more. It really depends on how you write and also how much WR you can hold in your head; I'm okay at memorizing the quotes, but I quickly forget the extra details if I try to learn too many! :-)
    I agree, I have 2-3 WR texts for each of poetry, prose and drama and have just analysed each to a point that allows me to cover a range of different aspects of love, relationships, marriage and sex to quite a bit of depth.

    On another note, do you know where I can get the raw mark grade boundaries please? (calculating how many marks I need makes me a little less nervous )
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    (Original post by confused dot com)
    I agree, I have 2-3 WR texts for each of poetry, prose and drama and have just analysed each to a point that allows me to cover a range of different aspects of love, relationships, marriage and sex to quite a bit of depth.

    On another note, do you know where I can get the raw mark grade boundaries please? (calculating how many marks I need makes me a little less nervous )
    You obviously can't get the raw mark grade boundaries for the exam coming up, because they're calculated based on how we do in the exam, but AQA helpfully publish all the previous raw mark to UMS conversion scales here; http://web.aqa.org.uk/UMS/index.php Just choose A2, then the year and exam you're interested in (it's LITA3, I believe, but I'm not entirely sure) and then tick the box that says 'convert multiple marks'. Hope that helps!
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    (Original post by PhysicsGirl)
    You obviously can't get the raw mark grade boundaries for the exam coming up, because they're calculated based on how we do in the exam, but AQA helpfully publish all the previous raw mark to UMS conversion scales here; http://web.aqa.org.uk/UMS/index.php Just choose A2, then the year and exam you're interested in (it's LITA3, I believe, but I'm not entirely sure) and then tick the box that says 'convert multiple marks'. Hope that helps!
    Sorry, I meant previous years' raw marks
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    (Original post by PhysicsGirl)
    It depends on the kind of points you like to make in your exam essays. Obviously, the broader your wider reading, the easier you'll find it to make connections, but I tend to go for depth more, simply because I find it easier to go into detail on a few, carefully chosen texts than range briefly through a wide choice of texts; it suits my writing style more. It really depends on how you write and also how much WR you can hold in your head; I'm okay at memorizing the quotes, but I quickly forget the extra details if I try to learn too many! :-)
    yeah I think I'm going to stick to the list I have now, I have a poem or two for each contextual stage, but going in depth for some of them. So I go from Wyatt for 16th C, to Gunn for 20th C etc, looking at comparisons and the themes. I prefer prose and drama to poetry
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    (Original post by confused dot com)
    I agree, I have 2-3 WR texts for each of poetry, prose and drama and have just analysed each to a point that allows me to cover a range of different aspects of love, relationships, marriage and sex to quite a bit of depth.

    On another note, do you know where I can get the raw mark grade boundaries please? (calculating how many marks I need makes me a little less nervous )
    Hi, sorry to butt in! Do you mean you have 2-3 wider reading links for each theme within each genre or just 2-3 for each genre? I worry that I won't be able to find links if I only have a few select quotes :/
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    (Original post by never too late)
    Hi, sorry to butt in! Do you mean you have 2-3 wider reading links for each theme within each genre or just 2-3 for each genre? I worry that I won't be able to find links if I only have a few select quotes :/
    Sorry, I meant 2-3 texts (except poetry where we have about 7 Keats poems) for each genre.
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    Wuthering Heights: Cathy says her love for Edgae will "change with the seasons" but her love for Heathcliff is "the eternal rocks beneath", showing C+H love as a impenetrable force and says "I am Heathcliff" showing that their love binds them as one and creating a need for fusion and replacing any thought of a higher being with each other, they will be together after death. C also doesn't marry H cause it would "degrade" her and Edgar would make her "rich" showing how society influences love and that marraige is often based on convenience rather than true love. In Jane Eyre, J won't marry John because she would "abandon" herself if she did so, because it would be a marraige not based on love. Also the idea of a "bride" being an "equal", and again ideas of love being impenentrable " something in my heart and bones linked me mentally to him, I was in love with him", that goes futher than appearances etc. Rochester says J is the "other half" of his "soul", showing inseperabiliy in love and the idea of their souls being joined after death. In Othello, Desdemona shows parental love and the difference in love "to you i'm bound for life and education, but I have a divided duty...here is my husband: my lord of duty". Othello thinks that if he kills her he will restore her to his faithful wife and be able to love her after: he does not love ehr unconditionally, he can only love her if she is pure "i will kill thee and love thee after" and she is "sweet" and "divine" when she is innocent and "whore" when she is presumed not to which she feels "undone" showing women who are seen as whores lose themseldves etc. In Ode to Melancholy by John Keates, personifaction of Beauty, Pleasure, joy pain etc heighten them and evelate them showing them to be neccessary to be experienced together and then can you only truly experience love.

    I would really appreciate if anyone has any notes on any poems as that's my weak point! Hope my ideas helped!
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    (Original post by NaomiHope)
    I would really appreciate if anyone has any notes on any poems as that's my weak point! Hope my ideas helped!
    Thank you for your ideas :-) I'm not sure if this will help or not, but I've print-screened the poetry section of my WR notes;
    Click image for larger version. 

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    (Original post by PhysicsGirl)
    Thank you for your ideas :-) I'm not sure if this will help or not, but I've print-screened the poetry section of my WR notes;
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Thank you! That's definately helpful!
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    How much wider reading has everybody actually done?! For prose, I'm on five texts and the same for drama. Less sure about poetry though - how many poems could you discuss in detail? Thanks!
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    (Original post by Joseph1994)
    How much wider reading has everybody actually done?! For prose, I'm on five texts and the same for drama. Less sure about poetry though - how many poems could you discuss in detail? Thanks!
    I ended up selecting 6 novels (not complete ones- I've read 4 of them, and other two are based on extracts), 6 dramas (again, two of which I haven't read in their entirety) and 6 poems to memorise quotes from. I know it doesn't sound like a lot, but I tried to make them as flexible as possible in terms of themes of love and I just could memorise enough detail if I included all of texts we studied! I'm not sure how many poems I could discuss in detail, but I am hoping question 1 is poetry- my drama and novel WR is a lot less wide ranging, so it'd be easier to fit into question 2, I think
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    Fair enough! I'm hoping for anything but poetry on Question 1!

    How are you structuring your essays? :P I've been going: Intro>Language of Extract A>Form/structure of Extract A>Language of Extract B/comparing to Extract A>Form/structure of Extract B/comparing with Extract A > WR1 > WR2 > WR3 > Conclusion. Also been dropping in brief WR references (for the texts I don't know in as greater detail) throughout.
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    (Original post by Joseph1994)
    Fair enough! I'm hoping for anything but poetry on Question 1!

    How are you structuring your essays? :P I've been going: Intro>Language of Extract A>Form/structure of Extract A>Language of Extract B/comparing to Extract A>Form/structure of Extract B/comparing with Extract A > WR1 > WR2 > WR3 > Conclusion. Also been dropping in brief WR references (for the texts I don't know in as greater detail) throughout.
    This is the plan I usually follow;

    (Original post by PhysicsGirl)
    Our teacher suggested to us this plan;
    Paragraph 1. Huge idea about the extracts and love
    Paragraphs 2., 3., 4., 5. (etc) Big ideas (that link to the central 'huge' idea) that contain detailed analysis f the extracts, as well as comparing & contrasting the two extracts against each other.
    Either in the above paragraphs, or separately, make specific and clear points about your WR (essay should be 30:70 of WR to Extracts, I've been told), selecting links and quotes that are relevant to both the extracts and your 'huge' idea.
    Paragraph 6. Return to your 'huge' idea and make a conclusion about it (try and say something new about if you can).

    Essentially, it's just about having a strong central argument that you explore throughout your essay. It's not that structurally detailed, and it's very generic but I find it helps keep me on task, and focused on the question as I tend to waffle if I don't have a strong central argument to refer to, which isn't great when I'm so tight for time anyway!
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    (Original post by NaomiHope)
    Wuthering Heights: Cathy says her love for Edgae will "change with the seasons" but her love for Heathcliff is "the eternal rocks beneath", showing C+H love as a impenetrable force and says "I am Heathcliff" showing that their love binds them as one and creating a need for fusion and replacing any thought of a higher being with each other, they will be together after death. C also doesn't marry H cause it would "degrade" her and Edgar would make her "rich" showing how society influences love and that marraige is often based on convenience rather than true love. In Jane Eyre, J won't marry John because she would "abandon" herself if she did so, because it would be a marraige not based on love. Also the idea of a "bride" being an "equal", and again ideas of love being impenentrable " something in my heart and bones linked me mentally to him, I was in love with him", that goes futher than appearances etc. Rochester says J is the "other half" of his "soul", showing inseperabiliy in love and the idea of their souls being joined after death. In Othello, Desdemona shows parental love and the difference in love "to you i'm bound for life and education, but I have a divided duty...here is my husband: my lord of duty". Othello thinks that if he kills her he will restore her to his faithful wife and be able to love her after: he does not love ehr unconditionally, he can only love her if she is pure "i will kill thee and love thee after" and she is "sweet" and "divine" when she is innocent and "whore" when she is presumed not to which she feels "undone" showing women who are seen as whores lose themseldves etc. In Ode to Melancholy by John Keates, personifaction of Beauty, Pleasure, joy pain etc heighten them and evelate them showing them to be neccessary to be experienced together and then can you only truly experience love.

    I would really appreciate if anyone has any notes on any poems as that's my weak point! Hope my ideas helped!
    This is brilliant - exactly what I needed! If I remember I will write up a few quotes from my poems!
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    Would family ever come up? It is love after all...
    I'm trying to analyse a voyage round my father by John Mortimer and failing miserably Great play, just do not know how to put it into WR.
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    Just wondering - what are the timings for this exam? Like how is it split?
    xx

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