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Is my job a bit embarrassing?

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    Anon or delete please, in case she reads this by some weird stretch of the imagination.

    Basically women, would you consider somebody who is 25 and a lifeguard as a serious partner? I went to uni but it wasn't exactly the best one and now I kind of just do this job full time.

    Is it a cool job to have or is it embarassing at this age? I don't think I'm ever going to get anything better so I am kind of content her. I know a girl and I was just wondering if it is something you'd consider?

    Skip all the fake "I'd love you for who you are " rubbish, would you be proud to take me home to your parents and say he's a full time lifeguard at the local pool? Is it good or bad in terms of prestige and being attractive to women...
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    I would have no problems in going out with a life guard, or introducing them to my parents. I don't really see what's embarrassing about it?
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    (Original post by amyshamblesxx)
    I would have no problems in going out with a life guard, or introducing them to my parents. I don't really see what's embarrassing about it?
    But as a career though. I'm doing the same work as teenagers (no disrespect) sitting at a pool getting paid no more than £8 an hour. Everybody else is off in good jobs etc, would you not expect me to strive for more by the time I'm 30? Have a better job, a proper job?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    But as a career though. I'm doing the same work as teenagers (no disrespect) sitting at a pool getting paid no more than £8 an hour. Everybody else is off in good jobs etc, would you not expect me to strive for more by the time I'm 30? Have a better job, a proper job?
    Well I would consider 'lifeguard' a proper job and £8 an hour is more than some of my friends earn. I work at an estate agents and some of colleagues are 18/19 so I don't think working with teenagers is an issue really.

    You said in your original post that you're quite happy and content with your job so I wouldn't worry about what other people think, I doubt a girl would be put off because you work as a lifeguard.
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    Well it's not embarrassing per se but the thing that would stand out for me is that you have a degree. I would expect you to have a little more ambition to be honest - even if it wasn't well-paid or intellectual at least something that uses more of your mental abilities.
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    (Original post by GdotL)
    Well it's not embarrassing per se but the thing that would stand out for me is that you have a degree. I would expect you to have a little more ambition to be honest - even if it wasn't well-paid or intellectual at least something that uses more of your mental abilities.
    Having a degree is so common that it doesn't really set you apart. There's only so many good jobs to go around.
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    (Original post by Dark Horse)
    Having a degree is so common that it doesn't really set you apart. There's only so many good jobs to go around.
    Of course, but I'd expect someone with a degree to at least have an office-type job rather than a service-industry one.
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    (Original post by GdotL)
    Of course, but I'd expect someone with a degree to at least have an office-type job rather than a service-industry one.
    :confused: why?
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    (Original post by GdotL)
    Of course, but I'd expect someone with a degree to at least have an office-type job rather than a service-industry one.
    Would that honestly bring more prestige?

    What if I just worked as a lifeguard, would that mean an instant no?
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    To be honest I'd be happy that you had a job at all. It would be more embarrassing for the girl to take you home to her parents and the question on what you do came up and you had to reply that you were unemployed.


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    (Original post by Rhiannan94)
    To be honest I'd be happy that you had a job at all. It would be more embarrassing for the girl to take you home to her parents and the question on what you do came up and you had to reply that you were unemployed.


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    But as a lifeguard, at 25. Would that be something you'd be happy with me doing for the rest of my life?

    That's what I want to know, being a lifeguard forever, would it be oaky?
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    (Original post by amyshamblesxx)
    :confused: why?
    I'd expect someone who enjoyed going to university, i.e. researching/evaluating/writing a dissertation, to prefer to be employed in using his mental abilities rather than physical. It's just a general assumption unless the OP has some mad passion for life-guarding and is so rich that he didn't mind being in debt just to formally pursue some academic interest.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Would that honestly bring more prestige?

    What if I just worked as a lifeguard, would that mean an instant no?
    I think it would bring more prestige as nobody really asks about the intricacies of office jobs and how senior you are in your department. I wasn't even initially talking about prestige, just that I thought it was more conventional for people who took degrees to be the type who preferred written work.

    Well, it wouldn't be an instant no! After all, I'd accept it quite happily from someone who hadn't undertaken a degree. Although personally I'd prefer someone who was more ambitious or keen for promotion. If lifeguarding is what you genuinely want to do for the rest of your life then seriously don't worry about it. The type of girl who would reject you on that basis wouldn't be compatible with you anyway.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    But as a lifeguard, at 25. Would that be something you'd be happy with me doing for the rest of my life?

    That's what I want to know, being a lifeguard forever, would it be oaky?
    Maybe not forever, but for now while you figure out what job you might love which could put your degree to good use it would be ok.


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    (Original post by GdotL)
    I think it would bring more prestige as nobody really asks about the intricacies of office jobs and how senior you are in your department. I wasn't even initially talking about prestige, just that I thought it was more conventional for people who took degrees to be the type who preferred written work.

    Well, it wouldn't be an instant no! After all, I'd accept it quite happily from someone who hadn't undertaken a degree. Although personally I'd prefer someone who was more ambitious or keen for promotion. If lifeguarding is what you genuinely want to do for the rest of your life then seriously don't worry about it. The type of girl who would reject you on that basis wouldn't be compatible with you anyway.
    Lol if they were higher up the ladder or did something particularly interesting, most people would work it into the conversation without needing to be asked.
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    I think a lifeguard is quite a cool job actually.
    It's much more attractive than an office type of job IMO, and £8 is not bad pay at all (:
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    Why does prestige matter at all?

    People lead different paths from their degrees all the time.

    As long as you're happy & financially sound, don't be constantly trying to conform to society.

    But then again if you were truely happy, you wouldnt be asking this question.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    But as a career though. I'm doing the same work as teenagers (no disrespect) sitting at a pool getting paid no more than £8 an hour. Everybody else is off in good jobs etc, would you not expect me to strive for more by the time I'm 30? Have a better job, a proper job?
    Because everyone is a barrister or surgeon amirite?

    OP, what matters is you're content with who YOU are. If you want another career go get it. If you're happy where you are then fine, any potential girlfriend should be happy that you're happy where you're at, and a solid job to boot.


    (Original post by GdotL)
    Of course, but I'd expect someone with a degree to at least have an office-type job rather than a service-industry one.
    Why?

    If we accept degrees are common as muck now and jobs are a scarce commodity, a lot of graduates simply have to take what they can get. This is ignoring the fact of reality that just because you have a degree (especially in this give-everyone-a-degree climate) doesn't suddenly make you lean towards office work or whatever.

    A job's a job and more importantly if it pays well enough then what does it matter?
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    (Original post by Studentus-anonymous)
    Why?

    If we accept degrees are common as muck now and jobs are a scarce commodity, a lot of graduates simply have to take what they can get. This is ignoring the fact of reality that just because you have a degree (especially in this give-everyone-a-degree climate) doesn't suddenly make you lean towards office work or whatever.

    A job's a job and more importantly if it pays well enough then what does it matter?
    If his life ambition was to be a lifeguard I don't see the advantages of doing a degree and incurring the associated costs. He doesn't seem to just be taking what he can get, he is pretty happy with his choice so it's not that factor.
    Well it pays well enough now but it could be a different story if he decides to have a family or if his physical health declines.
    He was asking a personal question to any girls and I just gave my opinion that it would affect me in a proper relationship, mainly for personality and ambition reasons.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Skip all the fake "I'd love you for who you are " rubbish, would you be proud to take me home to your parents and say he's a full time lifeguard at the local pool? Is it good or bad in terms of prestige and being attractive to women...

    So you'd rather someone loved you because of your job than for you? That "fake rubbish" you are referring to is the meat and potatoes of love. :rolleyes:

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