Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Wow just wow, Norway are going to pay for breivik to have "friends" whilst in Prison

Announcements Posted on
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    http://news.yahoo.com/prison-hire-pe...130652699.html

    I know Norway has always had a liberal prison system but I can't believe they're willing to spend more money on a guy that killed countless of children. It truly shows how great of a nation they really are. They're like epitome of Jesus with their kindness and compassion even towards the most sick prisoners.

    Inb4 right-wingers can't comprehend such acts of compassion and start chanting for death penalty/total isolation.
    • 6 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    no be fair, their reasoning there is actually pretty sound. he can't have normal associations, but they can't just leave him on his own forever either.

    people accuse Norway of having too soft a prison system, but from what I have read they have a far lower rate of repeat offenses. you can't argue with results, if criminals are less likely to commit a crime after leaving jail their system is working. rehabilitation is better than punishment, although Breivik is beyond rehabilitation
    • 3 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Probably for the best - he's mentally ill anyway, I doubt total isolation would help him recover. If he's going to ever go back into society, he needs a lot of support to make sure he's in a healthier state of mind.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I would be disgusted if my child was murdered in cold blood and my state's criminal justice system was this soft on them.
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by brendonbackflip)
    Probably for the best - he's mentally ill anyway, I doubt total isolation would help him recover. If he's going to ever go back into society, he needs a lot of support to make sure he's in a healthier state of mind.
    I doubt he'll ever rejoin society.
    • 3 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    That his 'punishment' involves spending the next 20 years in a state-paid hotel is an insult to his victims and their families. Norway is far too soft on this sort of thing.
    • 11 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    The Norwegian criminal justice system emphasises rehabilitation. I doubt they expect to get very far with Breivik, but at least they have the strength of principle to not bung him in a cell and leave him to rot in isolation.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    May sound harsh, but the victim should never matter. It's the offender who has the problem, not the victims. If it's possible to make someone a functional member of society again (which Norweigian law assumes is true) they should be made into that person, it's pointless having people sitting in prison feeling bad about what they've done. Do I think Breivik will be let out? No, he's seemingly insane and probably can't be rehabbed. But the way the law is in Norway they will try to fix him, if he is fixed then he should be let out.
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lucaf)
    no be fair, their reasoning there is actually pretty sound. he can't have normal associations, but they can't just leave him on his own forever either.

    people accuse Norway of having too soft a prison system, but from what I have read they have a far lower rate of repeat offenses. you can't argue with results, if criminals are less likely to commit a crime after leaving jail their system is working. rehabilitation is better than punishment, although Breivik is beyond rehabilitation
    I don't really think it's fair to say his beyond rehabilitation. His either mentally ill in which case a medical approach is the best way to achieve rehabilitation, obviously psychiatry isn't a field where it's easy to treat the patient but who knows it might have good success. Or there were social and environmental reasons in which case a look at the reasons and a program to combat these reasons is the best approach. Declaring someone unfixable isn't good for morale (placebo effect). I think the biggest obstacle to his rehabilitation is getting society to accept him (which I very much doubt) or physicians/guards to treat him as a normal patient/offender (which again I very much doubt can happen).
    • 22 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mufasaa)
    May sound harsh, but the victim should never matter. It's the offender who has the problem, not the victims. If it's possible to make someone a functional member of society again (which Norweigian law assumes is true) they should be made into that person, it's pointless having people sitting in prison feeling bad about what they've done. Do I think Breivik will be let out? No, he's seemingly insane and probably can't be rehabbed. But the way the law is in Norway they will try to fix him, if he is fixed then he should be let out.
    I would be interested to know what the re-offending rates are for those who are supposedly 'rehabilitated' in Norway. I know the re-offending rates for those coming out of British prisons is the best way to show that our system is just plain rubbish. But the systems are different. So yeh... would be interesting to know because I know a hundred better things that money could be spent on...
    • 8 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mufasaa)
    May sound harsh, but the victim should never matter. It's the offender who has the problem, not the victims. If it's possible to make someone a functional member of society again (which Norweigian law assumes is true) they should be made into that person, it's pointless having people sitting in prison feeling bad about what they've done. Do I think Breivik will be let out? No, he's seemingly insane and probably can't be rehabbed. But the way the law is in Norway they will try to fix him, if he is fixed then he should be let out.
    I honestly can't comprehend. It doesn't make me feel safe knowing that someone can murder me safely with the knowledge that they cannot be touched and even promised a life in comfort courtesy of those I would leave behind as well as the taxpayer.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Qaz25)
    I would be interested to know what the re-offending rates are for those who are supposedly 'rehabilitated' in Norway. I know the re-offending rates for those coming out of British prisons is the best way to show that our system is just plain rubbish. But the systems are different. So yeh... would be interesting to know because I know a hundred better things that money could be spent on...
    It's about 20%, Bastoy (where they send many bad offenders, rapists and such) has a 15% reoffending rate.
    • 6 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Roaroaroar)
    I don't really think it's fair to say his beyond rehabilitation. His either mentally ill in which case a medical approach is the best way to achieve rehabilitation, obviously psychiatry isn't a field where it's easy to treat the patient but who knows it might have good success. Or there were social and environmental reasons in which case a look at the reasons and a program to combat these reasons is the best approach. Declaring someone unfixable isn't good for morale (placebo effect). I think the biggest obstacle to his rehabilitation is getting society to accept him (which I very much doubt) or physicians/guards to treat him as a normal patient/offender (which again I very much doubt can happen).
    well I think they decided he wasn't mentally ill, or at least sane enough for being held accountable for his actions. while I know it is not impossible for him to be rehabilitated, and I agree they are obliged to try, having read his manifesto I cannot see him ever being a safe member of society. it takes a lot of conviction to do what he did, and somebody that set in their ways is unlikely to ever change. it would require him to admit to himself what he did was wrong, and I do not think anybody could let themselves take responsibility for murdering so many people, his sanity would not allow him to accept the guilt. he will continue justifying it because the alternative is probably worse than dying in prison.

    plus you are right, even if he admits the error of his ways I cannot see the public accepting him back. he is the biggest monster the country has seen in recent history
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Norway seems to have a great prison system, I doubt that we could afford it over here though.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Snagprophet)
    I honestly can't comprehend. It doesn't make me feel safe knowing that someone can murder me safely with the knowledge that they cannot be touched and even promised a life in comfort courtesy of those I would leave behind as well as the taxpayer.
    May not make you feel safe, but it'd mean there's fewer murderers and criminals on the street. Norway's got the second lowest homicide rate in the world after Austria (who lock up about 60% of the people we do), just over half of what we have. Obviously there's other factors at play but their system works.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    the idea of prison is to be a punishment.
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I agree with Norway.
    • 6 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Qaz25)
    I would be interested to know what the re-offending rates are for those who are supposedly 'rehabilitated' in Norway. I know the re-offending rates for those coming out of British prisons is the best way to show that our system is just plain rubbish. But the systems are different. So yeh... would be interesting to know because I know a hundred better things that money could be spent on...
    according to this, 20% http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...986002,00.html


    (Original post by Snagprophet)
    I honestly can't comprehend. It doesn't make me feel safe knowing that someone can murder me safely with the knowledge that they cannot be touched and even promised a life in comfort courtesy of those I would leave behind as well as the taxpayer.
    because punishing them does not really solve anything except satisfy the publics thirst for revenge. it does not undo the crime, and it increases the chances of them offending again.

    the first priority should be to be to protect the public, and then to try and prevent it from happening again. the conditions of our prisons may be a worse punishment, but they lead to a cycle of reoffences
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    the 9/11 bombers should have been rehabilitated if captured alive

    or wait, is rehabilitation aimed instead at petty criminals and the like. astonishing there are genuine claims that a mass-murder who meticulously planned his heinous atrocity for years can be brought back into society.
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lucaf)
    no be fair, their reasoning there is actually pretty sound. he can't have normal associations, but they can't just leave him on his own forever either.

    people accuse Norway of having too soft a prison system, but from what I have read they have a far lower rate of repeat offenses. you can't argue with results, if criminals are less likely to commit a crime after leaving jail their system is working. rehabilitation is better than punishment, although Breivik is beyond rehabilitation
    Repeat offenses is totally irrelevant in this case he is never getting out.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?

    this is what you'll be called on TSR

  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?

    never shared and never spammed

  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide the button to the right to create your account

    Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: June 23, 2012
New on TSR

Student crowdfunds degree

Graduate raises £26,000 online for Masters course

Article updates
Useful resources
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.