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Barrister or Solicitor?

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    I have always wanted to become a Barrister, rather then a Solicitor.
    However, I'm now having second doubts unfortunately, as there
    are clearly more firms then Chambers. It seems that it's easier to become a Solicitor then Barrister?

    It's harder to become a Barrister then a Solicitor I have always thought.
    Anyone else felt the same way?
    What modules can both Solicitors and Barristers do? I have done a few Mini Pupillages and have found out that both lawyers can do Land Law, not just Solicitors.

    Any advice? Thanks in advance
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    It is easier to become a solicitor than a barrister because the quality of applicants at the bar is higher for less places (something like that). Solicitors and Barristers can practice the same law but do different jobs within it. I suggest researching a lot more before making your mind up...
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    (Original post by sweetgyal24)
    I have always wanted to become a Barrister, rather then a Solicitor.
    However, I'm now having second doubts unfortunately, as there
    are clearly more firms then Chambers. It seems that it's easier to become a Solicitor then Barrister?

    It's harder to become a Barrister then a Solicitor I have always thought.
    Anyone else felt the same way?
    What modules can both Solicitors and Barristers do? I have done a few Mini Pupillages and have found out that both lawyers can do Land Law, not just Solicitors.

    Any advice? Thanks in advance
    Barristers and solicitors can practice any type of law - family/crime/commercial/property/human rights.

    The main difference is that barristers have higher rights of audience and can advocate in the courts such as the Supreme Court or the Court of Appeal - the higher courts, they also offer specialist advice. They have much less contact with clients and do a lot less of the "preparation" and paperwork involved in running cases.

    Solicitors have much more contact with clients and are often more involved in advising them. They do a lot more of the paperwork and can advocate in the lower courts such as the Magistrates' Court. They can also gain higher rights of audience like barristers.

    I found this on another forum on TSR, it might help you understand the differences a bit: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/shared/s..._Barrister.pdf

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Updated: June 11, 2012
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