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New Macbook Pro announced

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    ^ I managed to see one of the retina models in store this weekend, it's really nice looking.

    I was umming and ahhhing between the standard 15" and the retina, I ordered the retina in the end since I love the feature on my iPad/iPhone, since I mostly use my laptop for web browsing, iTunes etc I think it'll make a big difference for me - it's by no means a necessity but since I plan on keeping my new MBP for approx 4 years as I have my current MacBook I think it will 'futureproof' it to more of an extent than the non-retina would. The SSD also drew me to that one since I'm far too inept to install one myself on the 'old' model. Now just have to wait the 3-4 weeks to it arrive!
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    Equally if you're looking at the 'classic' Macbook Pro and the Retina Macbook Pro, the costs of externally putting the SSD/RAM almost starts to hit the MBPR price barrier. (Base is £1500, £150 for the equivalent Samsung 830 SSD and around £45 for your ram = around £1700, £99 less than a MBPR). Of course this model would also have the lower GDDR5 memory, a vastly inferior screen (both in gloss reduction, colour gamut/warmth and resolution/DPI), heavier and thicker

    If you're looking at the Macbook Pro classic 15" inch models, then I would say the MBPR is better value for money as they are priced competitively (within the Mac lineup). Get the MBPR if you have no need for the 'legacy' technology of an ODD and widespread need of RJ45. Though of course it is quite important to stress that you can use the thunderbolt adaptor.
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    (Original post by DomWall)
    PROBLEM:

    Hi, I am looking at getting a MacBook (and have been for a while) is it worth getting the retina display (I'm looking to do engineering at university) or should I just get the normal 15" Macbook with the anti-glare screen? Orrrrrrr. Do I not bother with the anti-glare and just get the normal screen, which is on offer at my local Comet for £999.
    The £999 is a good deal if it is the 15" MBP and you can put up with USB 2.0 and the old sandy bridge generation of processors and won't need the very good Nvidia Kepler chip. If you can live with that then £999 is a good deal and you can then use the funds you're going to save to buy on other things. (Extra cash is always a good thing, naturally).

    In relation to the original 15" anti-glare v MBPR. In this case, I myself, would go for the MBPR for the reasons I have posted above about the price range of the MBPR being competitive within the Mac lineup. The whole glossy v matte debate is solely a personal preference and I really do recommend you take a look at the MBPR in-store before you buy. One point I will make is that the MBPR has a huge reduction in the reflection of its glossy screen along with the beautiful Retina screen.

    I was playing around with it when we set up the MBPR after a few minutes I forgot that it was a glossy display which is test amount to the reduction of reflection levels in contrast to the previous glossy displays (which can look awful!)

    Edit; it's worth mentioning that the new Retina Macbook is IPS screens as well, which means it holds its colour/contrast so much better at all viewing angles in contrast to the previous panels. Again, go see for yourself.
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    Thanks for the help, I'll most likely hold out for the retina macbook then!
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    In other news, here is the engadget review of the MBPR.

    http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/13/a...isplay-review/

    They got 9 hours 22 on the battery (an average, not just a fluke). Wow.
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    (Original post by PVisitors)
    In other news, here is the engadget review of the MBPR.

    http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/13/a...isplay-review/

    They got 9 hours 22 on the battery (an average, not just a fluke). Wow.
    That is certainly impressive for such a powerful machine. Seems it is a wonderful piece of hardware as well as engineering, but I wouldn't expect anything less considering the price tag.

    I'm pondering over the 13" MB Air myself - £870 w/ student discount seems a pretty good deal considering the overall package. Just I'm not really a fan of the OS X interface, or any UNIX for that matter. Upgradability is also impossible, although non-removable batteries and soldered-on components are also being introduced in the Windows market... annoying.
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    I'm likely to purchase a Macbook of some description for uni this September but I'm currently unsure if I really need a 15-inch screen or if a 13-inch one would be more sensible...

    If I decided on a 15-inch screen I would in all likelihood opt for the 2.3GHz MBP w/ retina display (£1,799) and if I went for 13-inches I would probably get the 2.9GHz 'old' MPB (£1,249) or possibly the 13-inch Macbook Air (£999). Can anyone tell me the major differences between the three of these laptops apart from the obvious aesthetic/weight/display features.

    If I'm honest I don't understand what the specs for them on the website mean at all (ie. "2.5GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor (Turbo Boost up to 3.1GHz) with 3MB L3 cache"). Would the difference between the MBPw/RD's 2.3GHz and the 13i MBP's 2.9GHz processor be significant? I'm not a heavy user of computers by any means (I'm not a gamer/photographer/video editor) but would need this to last throughout my time at university and it would get frequent/heavy 'everyday' use. The price between these three options isn't really too much of an issue although it is a factor to a certain extent.

    Anyone able to offload some advice?
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    (Original post by UKiwi)
    I'm likely to purchase a Macbook of some description for uni this September but I'm currently unsure if I really need a 15-inch screen or if a 13-inch one would be more sensible...

    If I decided on a 15-inch screen I would in all likelihood opt for the 2.3GHz MBP w/ retina display (£1,799) and if I went for 13-inches I would probably get the 2.9GHz 'old' MPB (£1,249) or possibly the 13-inch Macbook Air (£999). Can anyone tell me the major differences between the three of these laptops apart from the obvious aesthetic/weight/display features.

    If I'm honest I don't understand what the specs for them on the website mean at all (ie. "2.5GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor (Turbo Boost up to 3.1GHz) with 3MB L3 cache"). Would the difference between the MBPw/RD's 2.3GHz and the 13i MBP's 2.9GHz processor be significant? I'm not a heavy user of computers by any means (I'm not a gamer/photographer/video editor) but would need this to last throughout my time at university and it would get frequent/heavy 'everyday' use. The price between these three options isn't really too much of an issue although it is a factor to a certain extent.

    Anyone able to offload some advice?
    1) MBA v MBP 13: I wouldn't really recommend the MBP13 unless you actively use the old ODD often. The new MBA is so much better than it, lighter, thinner, SSD storage (means the hard drive is significantly faster) and offering faster RAM and a much better resolution, the MBP13 resolution is really poor for a £999 laptop. However if you're considering spending £1200 for the high end 13" MBP. I would do the same with the MBA and either buy the 256gb upper end 13" MBA and put in the 8gb Ram via Apple's website as the RAM is soldered down so you can't customise it later down the line. Between these two the Air wins hands down and will feel much faster than the MBP13 for general usage because of its flash storage. The only benefit the MBP13 will offer is that it's processor is better than the Air, so if you do video/photo editing this will be pretty important. For general tasks such as browsing the internet, word processing etc then the Air is perfect.

    2) The MBPR: first of all, the processor on the MBPR isn't worse than the MBP13. It's lower than the 2.9Ghz in the MBP13 because it is a quad core (4 cores instead of 2) which increases performance, I can get technical, but that is the bottom line. Likewise the MBPR has the beautiful retina screen and faster storage than the MBPR and is using a faster generation of SSD storage compared to the MBA's flash memory. The MBPR will be a much better choice if you want to play games (either casually or often), it has a very good gfx chip in contrast to both the MBP13/MBA's integrated graphics. The MBPR will be able to play any game out at the moment on medium/high settings. The MBA/MBP13 will struggle on quite a lot of games with some not even playable at all.

    The MBPR comes down to whether you want a 15.4" laptop which is a powerhouse of performance but in a very light form factor (it's as light as the MBP13). If you feel you can justify spending the extra cash for a retina display, superior processor, SSD performance then get it. However, if you don't mind 'powerhouse' performance, lower screen resolution and losing 2 inches of screen size then the MBA13 w/ 8gb ram will be a very good choice. I myself personally would ignore the MBP13. It's a legacy computer which will be phased out by the end of next year when Apple launch the MBPR in 13".

    In terms of future proofing? The MBPR wins that hands down. Retina display resolution will slowly start become more and more prevalent for both Macs and Windows PCs plus it offers a significantly better processor over the MBA and the graphics card chip will ensure you can do casual gaming for some time. However the MBA will still get you 3 years of university.

    I've attached some benchmarks for the 13" MBA/MBP here; as you can see, the difference isn't negligible between them. Also added the MBPR for you to compare too. (higher score = better):
    Spoiler:
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    (Original post by PVisitors)
    ...
    Wow I really couldn't have hoped for a more comprehensive answer. Thanks so much for taking the time to write that, it's really helped me out.

    I guess given the above information it will come down to whether I feel the 15-inch screen is too big for what I'm looking for or not. For whatever reason I had always rejected the MBA as a genuine option as I was under the impression it quite 'gimmicky' and had heard it was almost like an iPad with a keyboard (same speed/memory) but that was obviously rather misinformed.

    I have to say having read that, a top-range MBA is quite an enticing prospect given the size/weight of it and the price difference between it and the MBPR...
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    (Original post by UKiwi)
    Wow I really couldn't have hoped for a more comprehensive answer. Thanks so much for taking the time to write that, it's really helped me out.

    I guess given the above information it will come down to whether I feel the 15-inch screen is too big for what I'm looking for or not. For whatever reason I had always rejected the MBA as a genuine option as I was under the impression it quite 'gimmicky' and had heard it was almost like an iPad with a keyboard (same speed/memory) but that was obviously rather misinformed.

    I have to say having read that a top-range MBA is quite an enticing prospect given the size/weight of it and the price difference between it and the MBPR...
    Well you were right; as of 2010 they were using crappy slow hard-drives and had /awful/ processors, but the second generation redesign replaced that with SSD which makes a significant difference and the latest Intel architecture which are producing superior ULV (low voltage processors) processors as a result of PC manufacturers now making ultrabooks. They've gone a full turn and they're now fantastic computers.

    And yeah, I recommend going to your local Apple store and having a look at both the MBA and MBPR. See whether the MBPR is a good size and weight for you and test out the Retina display and compare it to the 13" Air. I personally found the Retina to be a significant increase, but equally some people have said it hasn't blown them away, especially for the physical screen size as I find 13" laptop screen sizes too small. However saying that I have been very tempted with the 13" Air due to it's very good resolution of 1400x900 (that's higher than most windows 15.6" laptops and the same resolution as the classic 15" MBP) which gives more screen space seen on generic 13" laptops.

    The maxed out Air will definitely last at least 3 years of normal use, and will do it very very well but as I mentioned above but has quite big limitations on gaming and video/photo editing etc in contrast to the MBPR which will do the gaming/editing with relative ease for the next few years. To sum up, if you feel you're not going to game or use processor intense tasks on your laptop then the MBA will be a very good purchase.
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    (Original post by PVisitors)
    Well you were right; as of 2010 they were using crappy slow hard-drives and had /awful/ processors, but the second generation redesign replaced that with SSD which makes a significant difference and the latest Intel architecture which are producing superior ULV (low voltage processors) processors as a result of PC manufacturers now making ultrabooks. They've gone a full turn and they're now fantastic computers.

    And yeah, I recommend going to your local Apple store and having a look at both the MBA and MBPR. See whether the MBPR is a good size and weight for you and test out the Retina display and compare it to the 13" Air. I personally found the Retina to be a significant increase, but equally some people have said it hasn't blown them away, especially for the physical screen size as I find 13" laptop screen sizes too small. However saying that I have been very tempted with the 13" Air due to it's very good resolution of 1400x900 (that's higher than most windows 15.6" laptops and the same resolution as the classic 15" MBP) which gives more screen space seen on generic 13" laptops.

    The maxed out Air will definitely last at least 3 years of normal use, and will do it very very well but as I mentioned above but has quite big limitations on gaming and video/photo editing etc in contrast to the MBPR which will do the gaming/editing with relative ease for the next few years. To sum up, if you feel you're not going to game or use processor intense tasks on your laptop then the MBA will be a very good purchase.
    I sense I've got a rather difficult decision to make, although I imagine actually trying out the laptops in real life may really help. Maybe I'll fall in love with the MBPR, simply due to it's screen and design... It's happened before with me and Apple products.

    I hope you don't mind me picking your brain while I've got your attention... Say if I was to go for the top 13" MBA (256GB), would it be worth choosing the upgraded processor - '2.0GHz Intel Dual-Core Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.2GHz [+ £120.00]' on top of the increased RAM - '8GB 1600MHz DDR3L SDRAM [+ £80.00]'? Or do you think that is unnecessary... Similarly would it be beneficial to upgrade the £1,799 MBPR to 16GB RAM (+£160) if I was to opt for that computer?
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    (Original post by UKiwi)
    I sense I've got a rather difficult decision to make, although I imagine actually trying out the laptops in real life may really help. Maybe I'll fall in love with the MBPR, simply due to it's screen and design... It's happened before with me and Apple products.

    I hope you don't mind me picking your brain while I've got your attention... Say if I was to go for the top 13" MBA (256GB), would it be worth choosing the upgraded processor - '2.0GHz Intel Dual-Core Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.2GHz [+ £120.00]' on top of the increased RAM - '8GB 1600MHz DDR3L SDRAM [+ £80.00]'? Or do you think that is unnecessary... Similarly would it be beneficial to upgrade the £1,799 MBPR to 16GB RAM (+£160) if I was to opt for that computer?
    The Air's processor upgrade, I couldn't give a definitive answer as it is actually a modest cpu upgrade (and the price is modest for Apple too) but my gut tells me to stick to not bothering paying for .2 ghz of clock speed. You won't really notice a huge difference for the price. I think the 512gb SSD option for the Air is extortion too and I definitely wouldn't recommend that.

    The second one, also a reasonably tricky question given the soldered RAM so it's not user replaceable forcing you to buy straight from Apple (sad face). However for the usage you said? I would say probably not. By the time 8gb RAM isn't enough the GPU will be dated and your battery health declining. 8gb will be last and still go strong for another 4 years. I don't want to give a definitive answer as this is a question which is splitting the camp at Mac enthusiast forums. People in favour of 16gb argue that it helps retain value should you want to sell it after around 3 years but it's not something I really agree with as after around 3-4 years the GPU and Processor technology will have advanced significantly which would counter the 16gb RAM, hell it will probably be DDR4 Ram by that time. You're not doing any intense stuff so if it was my choice I would just stick with the standard 8gb.
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    (Original post by PVisitors)
    The Air's processor upgrade, I couldn't give a definitive answer as it is actually a modest cpu upgrade (and the price is modest for Apple too) but my gut tells me to stick to not bothering paying for .2 ghz of clock speed. You won't really notice a huge difference for the price. I think the 512gb SSD option for the Air is extortion too and I definitely wouldn't recommend that.

    The second one, also a reasonably tricky question given the soldered RAM so it's not user replaceable forcing you to buy straight from Apple (sad face). However for the usage you said? I would say probably not. By the time 8gb RAM isn't enough the GPU will be dated and your battery health declining. 8gb will be last and still go strong for another 4 years. I don't want to give a definitive answer as this is a question which is splitting the camp at Mac enthusiast forums. People in favour of 16gb argue that it helps retain value should you want to sell it after around 3 years but it's not something I really agree with as after around 3-4 years the GPU and Processor technology will have advanced significantly which would counter the 16gb RAM, hell it will probably be DDR4 Ram by that time. You're not doing any intense stuff so if it was my choice I would just stick with the standard 8gb.
    That pretty much clears things up, I imagine I'll stick with the 8GB of RAM unless I can convince my mum to pay for more of it than the 50/50 we've discussed. Thanks for all your help, very much appreciated.

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