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Jobs for the socially awkward...

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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    Postman
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    (Original post by suncake)
    I think it would be a good idea to try to build up your confidence, not avoid having to do so by getting a job where you seclude yourself.

    I felt the same as you - socially awkward, generally hate 90% of all humans etc... But I got a job at Primark (lol) and found that it actually really helps to expose yourself to new people, who you would never usually talk to. Forcing yourself into awkward situations is sometimes the best way to learn to overcome them. I never imagined that I could confidently talk to customers, but it comes more naturally with time. Plus I'm sure you would also build relations with your co-workers over time, which is never a bad thing.
    I do think it's something I could overcome with time but part of the problem is it would probably be pretty clear from an interview that I'm really not personable. Hence why it would be easier to first gain experience in a role where I don't need to talk much.

    I'm not a social reject, I just get really nervous around people and tend to start mumbling and going red. :sad:
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    (Original post by Llamageddon)
    Whilst this sentiment does suggest a certain lack of understanding of personality types...
    Oh, I do understand OP's personality type - I just don't think it'll get her very
    far in life if she can't change it/cover it up.
    Maybe that is because I am more the flamboyant type myself, or because I
    work in an industry where socialising, networking, small-talking and
    communication in general is what can make the difference.

    (Original post by Llamageddon)
    You need to separate your personal and professional mannerisms...People just need to throw themselves in the deep-end and do things they don't like.
    Precisely. In OP's case, it's a very necessary annoyance. She needs to realise
    that communicating is not only unavoidable but also quite useful to progress in
    life and in one's career. You meet and get to know so many more people in a
    highly communicative job - which means more chances to impress people, start
    creating a network and maybe get better job offers.
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    (Original post by vls)
    Do they exist in the current economic climate? I'm not good with interviews or talking to people I don't know. What sort of employers would overlook this as it is not in the job description?

    Cleaning jobs spring to mind but I'm not too keen on the idea of scrubbing public toilets.
    I assume Argos would have little interaction with the public, if you were in the store room.
    A kitchen porter perhaps, you would only need to talk to kitchen staff.
    A maid in a hotel, cleaning rooms and what not.
    Maybe a job in a factory?
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    (Original post by vls)
    I do think it's something I could overcome with time but part of the problem is it would probably be pretty clear from an interview that I'm really not personable. Hence why it would be easier to first gain experience in a role where I don't need to talk much.

    I'm not a social reject, I just get really nervous around people and tend to start mumbling and going red. :sad:
    The way you get around this is by throwing yourself into it. Experience of social interaction prevents you from getting so flustered.
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    (Original post by vls)
    I do think it's something I could overcome with time but part of the problem is it would probably be pretty clear from an interview that I'm really not personable. Hence why it would be easier to first gain experience in a role where I don't need to talk much.

    I'm not a social reject, I just get really nervous around people and tend to start mumbling and going red. :sad:
    I was in a very similar position to you a couple of years ago and honestly, I think the best thing to do is to apply for as many jobs as possible and go to as many interviews as possible. I was absolutely terrified before my first interview, and messed it up pretty badly but afterwards I just realised that whether I got the job or not, that one interview really wasn't anything to be scared about - it wasn't going to have any big impact on my life. After that, every interview seemed much easier and not too much later I got my current job. I've been working in retail for 8 months and honestly I feel it's done more for my self-confidence than therapy for social anxiety did.

    In short, I'd advise you just to go to a couple of interviews safe in the knowledge that they really don't matter. If you still feel you don't want to work with people, at least you've got the interview experience to go for something like back-of-house work as has been suggested.
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    (Original post by vls)
    I do think it's something I could overcome with time but part of the problem is it would probably be pretty clear from an interview that I'm really not personable. Hence why it would be easier to first gain experience in a role where I don't need to talk much.

    I'm not a social reject, I just get really nervous around people and tend to start mumbling and going red. :sad:
    I think you just have to put on a bit of an act for the interview
    over time you will start to feel more comfortable with your colleagues
    and you will probably have more self confidence- sounds unrealistic, but trust me its a big satisfaction getting through that interview stage, even for a small job because you know that they like a certain quality about you
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    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    Oh, I do understand OP's personality type - I just don't think it'll get her very
    far in life if she can't change it/cover it up.
    Maybe that is because I am more the flamboyant type myself, or because I
    work in an industry where socialising, networking, small-talking and
    communication in general is what can make the difference.
    therefore your previous comment is invalid.

    OP.. I am the same as you.. well I think..

    I need to know what good jobs to do too. I don't want to be leaflet hander-outer all my life.
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    I used to be a very shy,socially awkward person. But i can promise you,retail changes that for the better. I was a waitress,then moved on to waterstone's,and am now at Greggs. I still get very anxious before work (ive always had bad anxiety issues which led to me becoming very introverted and shy),but when im there its actually fun and my shyness goes away. It is a serious confidence booster.

    However,if you really wish to avoid it,then thats ok. It can be distressing. My dad is like you OP - shy, not a fan of customer interaction. Since 16,his career has gone :carpet fitter,postman,asda distribution,warehouse/forklift truck operative. You could consider these roles.
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    (Original post by vls)
    I do think it's something I could overcome with time but part of the problem is it would probably be pretty clear from an interview that I'm really not personable. Hence why it would be easier to first gain experience in a role where I don't need to talk much.

    I'm not a social reject, I just get really nervous around people and tend to start mumbling and going red. :sad:
    Before my interview, I literally rehearsed what I would say for every possible question over and over in my head so I wouldn't sound too awkward. As people have already said, for more introverted people like us, who aren't as good at talking, there really is an element of acting needed for interviews!

    It depends on the extent of your shyness I guess, but I still think getting a job which involves talking + human interaction would really benefit you. But I realised that even in my job, in a busy clothing retailer, I can get away with not talking to anyone for aaages, unless customers ask me questions (who obviously you can't ignore)! Even if you kinda mumble at them or can't answer their questions, nothing bad can really happen, as long as you remain polite and say sorry. You'll probably never see them again anyway
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    (Original post by vls)
    Do they exist in the current economic climate? I'm not good with interviews or talking to people I don't know. What sort of employers would overlook this as it is not in the job description?

    Cleaning jobs spring to mind but I'm not too keen on the idea of scrubbing public toilets.
    Try to get a bar job. That'd force you to interact. And help you later on in life..
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    Moving trolleys around the car park
    This is actually very true. I work at Morrisons and they put the socially awkward ones in the car park and the warehouse.
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    (Original post by vls)
    Do they exist in the current economic climate? I'm not good with interviews or talking to people I don't know. What sort of employers would overlook this as it is not in the job description?

    Cleaning jobs spring to mind but I'm not too keen on the idea of scrubbing public toilets.
    Grave digger.
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    Drug testing guinea pig? Failing that, McDonalds? The primary requirement to work there is that you can point and grunt. You're overqualified.
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    (Original post by Dorito)
    why don't you try and increase your confidence and apply for jobs that you might feel uncomfortable in at first, as to overcome your shyness?

    ...or you could just run away from the problem all your life and try and find jobs where you don't have to talk to anyone.
    Well said.

    I mean I can be pretty shy, but I've recently got a job in a petrol station (till etc) and it's no problem.
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    - Get a driving job; bsolutely brilliant lifestyle.

    Otherwise,

    - Author
    - Photographer
    - Musician
    - Pro. golfer
    - IT programming etc..
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    [QUOTE=Madchester;38162311]- Get a driving job; bsolutely brilliant lifestyle.

    Otherwise,

    - Pro. golfer


    LOL! They have to interact with people!

    What a random choice. And ike she would do that as a part time job.
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    (Original post by vls)
    I do think it's something I could overcome with time but part of the problem is it would probably be pretty clear from an interview that I'm really not personable. Hence why it would be easier to first gain experience in a role where I don't need to talk much.

    I'm not a social reject, I just get really nervous around people and tend to start mumbling and going red. :sad:
    become a poet. write poetry. We'll buy it.
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    Moving trolleys around the car park
    LOL, I have seen these people at ASDA. They always seem to be sad, but great skill at moving like 100s of trolleys through the parking space, all at once.
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    (Original post by vls)
    Do they exist in the current economic climate? I'm not good with interviews or talking to people I don't know. What sort of employers would overlook this as it is not in the job description?

    Cleaning jobs spring to mind but I'm not too keen on the idea of scrubbing public toilets.
    I think you should start believing in yourself and become more confident rather than avoiding situations/jobs you don’t feel you can’t achieve in.

    You will find life so much easier when you do

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