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If there's a triplet does it mean there are 2 adjacent carbons?

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    Can someone explain this? HOW many adjacent carbons on singlet and doublets?
    Can you explain how to use the (n-1) rule?
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    ermm, pretty sure any elememtary physical textbook or NMR textbooks would teach you this in the first couple of pages.
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    It's not to do with the number of carbons - its the number of hydrogens coming off the adjacent carbon, + 1 to the number and that gives you the amount of splitting in that peak.

    If the adjacent carbon has 0 hydrogens, add 1 and you get 1. So the peak will just be a singlet and appear as a single line with no splitting.

    If the adjacent carbon has 1 hydrogen, add one and you get 2. So the peak will split into 2, and is called a doublet.

    And so on...
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    (Original post by shengoc)
    ermm, pretty sure any elememtary physical textbook or NMR textbooks would teach you this in the first couple of pages.
    why even comment?....
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    (Original post by clad in armour)
    why even comment?....
    the whole idea of the forum is to direct people in difficulties where to look and that was exactly what i did.
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    (Original post by Abbers)
    Can someone explain this? HOW many adjacent carbons on singlet and doublets?
    Can you explain how to use the (n-1) rule?
    if there are hydrogens bonded to adjacent carbon atoms then the peak will split into n+1 peaks where n is the number of hydrogens on the adjacent atoms. The ratio of peak heights is determined by Pascal's triangle.

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Updated: June 18, 2012
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