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"Teachers should not give sweets and chocolates as a reward"

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    Teachers in my school sometimes brought in sweets as a treat at Christmas or the end of the year. I don't see anything wrong with this.

    I can see how giving sweets out as rewards could send the wrong signal however :beard:
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    What a load of sh**

    Whoever agrees with this should go and join Gillian McKeith and Daily Mail readers. Bring on the negs.
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    (Original post by Shanij)
    Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Why?
    I disagree with this statement for scientific reasons. When an uncertain reward is anticipated the levels of dopamine in the mid-brain region increase dramatically than if it were a predicable reward.

    Dopamine is vital in the reward structure of the brain, as is the reward structure to learning. It fulfills the desire for recognition and achievement. Therefore giving sweets and chocolate as rewards promotes and helps learning. However, the rewards must be unpredictable to cause the raised dopamine levels, if they were predictable their would just be a short spike of dopamine and nothing afterwards.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    Schools have very comprehensive list of pupils' medical conditions which is circulated to all those who need to know. The class teacher would know not to give the child something. These things are flagged up very clearly, especially in the case of young children who can't be expected to take responsibility for themselves.
    Generally, if it's a subsistute teacher they probably have no idea. Also, it's quiet upsetting for a student to know that they are not allowed the same sweet as everybody else because they are "different" from the rest of their peers.
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    (Original post by Shanij)
    Generally, if it's a subsistute teacher they probably have no idea. Also, it's quiet upsetting for a student to know that they are not allowed the same sweet as everybody else because they are "different" from the rest of their peers.
    They should have been told. Documentation for cover lessons with supply teachers includes special needs information. I'm sure it is upsetting for the child, hence the tendency to give stickers and so forth. If I were a primary teacher I would handle things differently to the way I do now. It's the kind of thing they get training on. When I give things out at the end of term, I offer a free choice of the edible and non edible, but I teach at secondary level.
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    (Original post by cid)
    Its the teachers job to motivate the young child, at that age children are inquisitive and can be quite receptive to education but teaching a toddler is different to teaching a teenager at a young age such as 3 or 4 a teacher should be trying to make the subject of their lessons fun.

    If a teacher of children of such a young age is having to break out sweets, they should probably ask themselves if they're really cut out for the job.


    Again just to keep it clear, i have no problem with celebration sweets, like at Christmas or on birthdays, or cupcakes or whatever.

    I also think its unprofessional to accept gifts from students even at the end of term or post exams. But this is just my opinion and i fully appreciate why its done, i just feel it is unprofessional.
    To some extent, I do agree with your point of view. Teachers should be able to motivate students through their teaching, not bribing. I feel some students feel rewarding teachers is part of "the lesson plan" though it shouldn't be. If a teacher cannot make their lessons interesting, they shouldn't be relying on bribery.
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    No! No sweets for students! They should answer these questions regardless or do something good! They're at school, either like it or lump it! If a student can't be asked to learn then that's their fault.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    They should have been told. Documentation for cover lessons with supply teachers includes special needs information. I'm sure it is upsetting for the child, hence the tendency to give stickers and so forth. If I were a primary teacher I would handle things differently to the way I do now. It's the kind of thing they get training on. When I give things out at the end of term, I offer a free choice of the edible and non edible, but I teach at secondary level.
    This raises awareness, there's many supply teacher who don't. Not necessarily in my school, but others. There was something on the news last year, about a young boy who suffered from a heart attack due to a teacher giving him chocolates. Teachers really need to be told about anything and everything, especially for young children.
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    (Original post by Shanij)
    This raises awareness, there's many supply teacher who don't. Not necessarily in my school, but others. There was something on the news last year, about a young boy who suffered from a heart attack due to a teacher giving him chocolates. Teachers really need to be told about anything and everything, especially for young children.
    I can only speak from experience of my own school and my husband's, and in both cases, they are told these things and physically taken to the place where the labelled epipens are kept so they know where to find them. Mistakes do happen. People are human. No amount of legislation will take that away, I'm afraid.
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    (Original post by pink pineapple)
    I doubt giving kids a funsize pack of haribo as a reward for something is going to contribute much to the obesity rate.
    As an earlier comment stated, it's not the pack of haribos. It's the connection with food as a reward.
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    (Original post by Shanij)
    But at such a young age, around 4, students probably are not aware of what ingredients they are not allowed. They may have a vague idea, but maybe not 100%. Also, at that age students may even think "my mum isn't here, let me just risk having a sweet, she won't know, nothing will happen"
    Well then they were raised with a very poor understanding of their condition. Which is entirely their parents fault, not the fault of the teacher or the other classmates who can eat what they want.
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    (Original post by cid)
    What? ...sweets? where the hell did you guys go to school?

    what are you trained dolphins? 'Well done Timmy, now catch this chocolate in mid air with your mouth'

    Just reinforcing children's dependence on instant gratification and setting them up for a hard fall in in the long run.

    Children should not be receiving sweets, treats or anything of that nature from their teacher, if its someones birthday or a reason to celebrate then its fine, but the idea of using treats to reward acceptable behavior and favorable performance, is this a school or Battersea dog home?
    It's called positive reinforcement, it works on most animals including humans. It is rooted in a primitive part of our psyche and is far stronger than the higher developed areas of the brain. It will ALWAYS be an effective teaching technique.
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    I won sweets in a uni lecture. :emo:
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    Whoever said stickers don't work on 8 year olds.. in year 10 I remember people still getting excited over bloody stickers lol!
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    (Original post by ThatPerson)
    I disagree with this statement for scientific reasons. When an uncertain reward is anticipated the levels of dopamine in the mid-brain region increase dramatically than if it were a predicable reward.

    Dopamine is vital in the reward structure of the brain, as is the reward structure to learning. It fulfills the desire for recognition and achievement. Therefore giving sweets and chocolate as rewards promotes and helps learning. However, the rewards must be unpredictable to cause the raised dopamine levels, if they were predictable their would just be a short spike of dopamine and nothing afterwards.

    Aha, familiar with the skinner box experiment are we? :beard:
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    (Original post by janet9)
    No! The occasional sweet and little treat hardly does any harm, it's a great reward incentive for quizzes. And it doesn't have to be just sweets, but biscuits too. I remember in Reception every day during 'play-time' that we got to have a Rich Tea biscuit if we wanted to. It wasn't cookies or anything too trashy. At the time, Rich Tea biscuits never tasted so good!
    They still taste friggin awesome!
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    (Original post by Addzter)
    I won sweets in a uni lecture. :emo:
    What "uni" was this?
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    Stickers are like a "childhood best friend" We gain them when going to the doctors/dentists/star cards/ surprise toys in kinder eggs/ magazines/ everywhere...
    It's as if stickers are what complete us, just we don't want to own up to liking them incase we get judged.

    I bet when somebody offers you a sticker you laugh, but deep down you wish for them to force you to take it
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    (Original post by Shanij)
    This question aroused on the news a while ago, people argued that
    •When you reward a child, they believe they are perfect and don't continue their hard work
    •Giving sweets are bad
    •If a teacher is unaware of allergies a child has, they may give them a chocolate they shouldn't be eating

    Honestly though, I am in favour of giving sweets as rewards
    First point contradicts with behavioural psychology and makes no sense anyway: if you do something and get rewarded for it, you'll repeat that behaviour.
    Third point: if a kid has allergies and willingly takes food they know they shouldn't eat, then thats the kid's fault xD
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    (Original post by harufi)
    First point contradicts with behavioural psychology and makes no sense anyway: if you do something and get rewarded for it, you'll repeat that behaviour.
    Third point: if a kid has allergies and willingly takes food they know they shouldn't eat, then thats the kid's fault xD
    The problem is, some parents feel that it ISN'T their child's fault and is the teachers


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