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When to "hand in my notice" opinions...

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    Basically i work full times right now, 8-5.

    have done for 7years, i going to uni in september full time.

    obviously i cannot continue this work aswell as im doing this course and its my main part of life instead of work and will need my full attention.

    i have enjoyed and grown whilst working here.

    However im only legally obliged to give 4weeks notice.

    I have a few options.

    1. give 4weeks around the end of july and leave end of august giving a week or 2 before uni "break"

    2. give 6-8weeks notice to allow to the find a replacement for myself out of gratitude for helping me through my early life.

    3. give 6-8weeks notice but give them an option of my working part time and "holiday" cover over summers and half terms.

    without sounding big headed im quite a useful member of staff who even though ive handed in my notice 4times has always been kept on with payrises and promotions etc. however uni is a non negotiable reason. i can see them wanting to keep me on the books however possible.

    whats anyones and everyones mature opinions on my situation?

    thanks
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    I'd go for option 3 - I think as you've worked there so long and they seem to have treated you well you should give them a bit more notice and it's always nice to be able to go back to work somewhere in the holidays
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    (Original post by timothytom)
    Basically i work full times right now, 8-5.

    have done for 7years, i going to uni in september full time.

    obviously i cannot continue this work aswell as im doing this course and its my main part of life instead of work and will need my full attention.

    i have enjoyed and grown whilst working here.

    However im only legally obliged to give 4weeks notice.

    I have a few options.

    1. give 4weeks around the end of july and leave end of august giving a week or 2 before uni "break"

    2. give 6-8weeks notice to allow to the find a replacement for myself out of gratitude for helping me through my early life.

    3. give 6-8weeks notice but give them an option of my working part time and "holiday" cover over summers and half terms.

    without sounding big headed im quite a useful member of staff who even though ive handed in my notice 4times has always been kept on with payrises and promotions etc. however uni is a non negotiable reason. i can see them wanting to keep me on the books however possible.

    whats anyones and everyones mature opinions on my situation?

    thanks
    I'll be leaving my job of nearly three years for uni, I'm leaving at the start of August and saying I'm around to cover for summer and holidays and stuff, also if they need me before I actually go I am about as well
    I'd give them as much notice as possible, I let my employers know I was leaving in January
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    (Original post by SophylaReserve)
    I'll be leaving my job of nearly three years for uni, I'm leaving at the start of August and saying I'm around to cover for summer and holidays and stuff, also if they need me before I actually go I am about as well
    I'd give them as much notice as possible, I let my employers know I was leaving in January
    this wasnt possible for me, as my role is one which is required full time, if i told them i would have many tasks slowly weened off me so that right now id be basically doing nothing so they could get rid. so ihave to wait till the very last minute.
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    Option 3 sounds a better more long term option.

    But why do you feel you have to give twice the amount of time. You aren't doing it out of spite?

    If you really feel you need to however give in your notice now? I'm not sure if you will be going away or how old you are but you may appreciate the 2 weeks before Uni.
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    Lucky you! the second I hand my notice in i'm out :rolleyes:

    Can't you ask for a contract reduction? Maybe get contracted to 10 hours per week at convenient times for you and then offer overtime when possible?

    My work has me on a 19 hour contract, which is 3 days. Easily fits round university
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    I left my job of 5 years last year. I gave them 4 weeks notice and nothing else. It felt brilliant.

    Clearly you are more considerate than I am. Option 3 sounds good.
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    (Original post by Horatio-)
    Option 3 sounds a better more long term option.

    But why do you feel you have to give twice the amount of time. You aren't doing it out of spite?

    If you really feel you need to however give in your notice now? I'm not sure if you will be going away or how old you are but you may appreciate the 2 weeks before Uni.
    im soon to be 24, i feel obliged to show my colleagues in a very tightly staffed place of a big company the chance to find a replacement rather than throw them with a very very tough job until they find someone decent.
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    more info is that its a specialised job in a department open only 8-5 weekdays. So the opening times wont be able for a full time uni course. i need part time elsewhere and holiday cover there basically.

    but from the age of 16 and an apprenticeship they have helped me through a lot, i have the same colleagues as when i was 16 to now so its a bit like a close group of friends rather than just employers. however not many know im leaving.
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    If you think that giving greater than your contractual notice period will mean that you will be on better terms, and more likely to be able to get PT and holiday work - then what's the downside?

    On the other hand, you never know how an employer will react. To be brutally honest, they really may not give a toss, and could be quite surprised that you are actually giving them notice. You may be disappointed if they actually tell you that there is no need to give them extended notice.

    Before I left my job to go to university, I gave my contractual 4 weeks notice. The company made no effort to do anything in the way of finding a replacement. The handover was done on my last day and I was told that I was the first person in the history of the firm to give notice. Every other employee had either resigned with immediate effect (in breach of contract - but as if they would bring a suit on that), or had just stopped turning up to work with no contact.
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    (Original post by Soph.Jade)
    I'd go for option 3 - I think as you've worked there so long and they seem to have treated you well you should give them a bit more notice and it's always nice to be able to go back to work somewhere in the holidays
    THIS. I read the OP and was going to reply with an answer along these lines, to read down and see you'd already written it!
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    I'd say option 3, but be aware they may then ditch you earlier than you want. I worked for a firm (through an agency) last year for about 6 months, full time, and left for a job with proper career prospects. I didn't have to give any notice at all, but thought it'd be reasonable to give them a week or so notice to find a replacement - instead I got told not to go back, as it was easier for their payroll. I wasn't too happy, especially as it was £10 an hour!
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    3 is looking very likely, im thinking maybe arrange an informal meeting and discuss everything.

    due to my standing i know i cannot be dismissed and all that until i hand in my notice so by discussing my intentions my contract cannot be changed without the legal notice. which is now 7weeks from them or 4 from me
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    I'd say option 3, but be aware they may then ditch you earlier than you want. I worked for a firm (through an agency) last year for about 6 months, full time, and left for a job with proper career prospects. I didn't have to give any notice at all, but thought it'd be reasonable to give them a week or so notice to find a replacement - instead I got told not to go back, as it was easier for their payroll. I wasn't too happy, especially as it was £10 an hour!
    I can only be put on gardening leave for the remainder i cannot be asked to leave employment.
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    (Original post by timothytom)
    I can only be put on gardening leave for the remainder i cannot be asked to leave employment.
    Nothing to lose then!

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Updated: June 25, 2012
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