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WJEC Mathematics

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    Is it a disadvantage to sit A Level Mathematics and Further Mathematics with WJEC. I don't know about difficulty but if I wanted to do A Level F.Maths I'd have to sit at least 2 statistics modules as opposed to other people who have about 5/6 mechanics modules! WJEC only have three and not even a Decisions Module, these are all their modules:
    C1
    C2
    C3
    C4
    FP1
    FP2
    FP3
    M1
    M2
    M3
    S1
    S2
    S3

    I was just wondering if this is unfair on people who want to do more mechanics and dislike statistics, would it put them at a disadvantage?
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    Any ideas?
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    In the answer to your question, if you want to sit 5 mechanics modules which very few people do then it is a disadvantage.
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    (Original post by SecondHand)
    In the answer to your question, if you want to sit 5 mechanics modules which very few people do then it is a disadvantage.
    That's unfair...
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    (Original post by shadab786ahmed)
    Is it a disadvantage to sit A Level Mathematics and Further Mathematics with WJEC. I don't know about difficulty but if I wanted to do A Level F.Maths I'd have to sit at least 2 statistics modules as opposed to other people who have about 5/6 mechanics modules! WJEC only have three and not even a Decisions Module, these are all their modules:
    C1
    C2
    C3
    C4
    FP1
    FP2
    FP3
    M1
    M2
    M3
    S1
    S2
    S3

    I was just wondering if this is unfair on people who want to do more mechanics and dislike statistics, would it put them at a disadvantage?
    I'm doing both Maths and Further Maths with WJEC, and in terms of difficulty it is the easiest exam board for Maths. The papers are very consistent and routine.

    You could say not having M4 & M5 is a disadvantage, but I doubt that many students will take those anyway. I'm applying for engineering, and not having M4 and M5 doesn't concern me at all. I'll have FP1, FP2, FP3, M2, M3 and S2 and that is a pretty decent foundation to have before commencing an engineering course.
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    Study with a different exam board?
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    (Original post by Tullia)
    I'm doing both Maths and Further Maths with WJEC, and in terms of difficulty it is the easiest exam board for Maths. The papers are very consistent and routine.

    You could say not having M4 & M5 is a disadvantage, but I doubt that many students will take those anyway. I'm applying for engineering, and not having M4 and M5 doesn't concern me at all. I'll have FP1, FP2, FP3, M2, M3 and S2 and that is a pretty decent foundation to have before commencing an engineering course.
    Okay! that's good to hear! I really dislike statistics though which is annoying! Do you enjoy it? What grades are you expecting? What type of engineering? University? Sorry, just interested
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    (Original post by SecondHand)
    Study with a different exam board?
    Don't think it is possible, oh well! I'll make the most of it
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    (Original post by shadab786ahmed)
    Okay! that's good to hear! I really dislike statistics though which is annoying! Do you enjoy it? What grades are you expecting? What type of engineering? University? Sorry, just interested
    I much prefer mechanics modules, but I have to admit that the way my teacher has approached statistics has meant that I've enjoyed it more than I expected to do so. WJEC have the content the opposite way around to most other exam boards for statistics, in that you'll do Poisson and binomial distribution in S1 and then mostly normal distribution in S2.

    To be honest, there is enough core maths in the statistics modules to keep you happy if that is your sort of thing. It's nothing in depth or anything, but it does allow you to apply your knowledge to different scenarios and situations and give you a different approach to problem-solving.

    I'm expecting As in both Maths and Further Maths at AS, and I'll be hoping for A*s at A2 as well. The College I'm now attending isn't necessary the best in terms of results, as in January there was only 6 students (including me) that got an A in C1. There is only one other student that takes Further Maths as well.

    I'm applying to study Chemical Engineering. I still have the option to apply to Cambridge and Imperial, but I'm likely to apply to Manchester, Birmingham, Nottingham, Leeds and Newcastle instead.
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    (Original post by Tullia)
    I much prefer mechanics modules, but I have to admit that the way my teacher has approached statistics has meant that I've enjoyed it more than I expected to do so. WJEC have the content the opposite way around to most other exam boards for statistics, in that you'll do Poisson and binomial distribution in S1 and then mostly normal distribution in S2.

    To be honest, there is enough core maths in the statistics modules to keep you happy if that is your sort of thing. It's nothing in depth or anything, but it does allow you to apply your knowledge to different scenarios and situations and give you a different approach to problem-solving.

    I'm expecting As in both Maths and Further Maths at AS, and I'll be hoping for A*s at A2 as well. The College I'm now attending isn't necessary the best in terms of results,
    as in January there was only 6 students (including me) that got an A in C1. There is only one other student that takes Further Maths as well.

    I'm applying to study Chemical Engineering. I still have the option to apply to Cambridge and Imperial, but I'm likely to apply to Manchester, Birmingham, Nottingham, Leeds and Newcastle instead.
    Omg! Omg! I've noticed they do the reverse :P hopefully my teachers will approach it in a way I'll enjoy it too! Hopefully they'll make it so I actually have fun with it, I love Maths and then I really like Mechanics too!
    I hope you meet your grades! I don't think schools are to be the sole factor to determine performance, I go to a school where it is considered rubbish! But our results are quite good
    I want to do Chemical Engineering at Imperial/Cambridge hence the excitement when I read your reply! so may I ask what other A Levels you are taking and how you find them?

    I'm in year ten and I'm going to sit C1 C2 and M1 in the January of year 11. But I'm really tempted to ask to sit C3 or something as well! the a levels I want to take are:
    Maths, f.maths, chemistry, physics and French
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    Is this suitable?
    Year 11: Jan: C1 C2 M1
    Year 12: Jan: C3 S1 June: C4 M2 S2
    Year 13: Jan: FP1 June: M3 FP2 FP3
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    (Original post by shadab786ahmed)
    Is this suitable?
    Year 11: Jan: C1 C2 M1
    Year 12: Jan: C3 S1 June: C4 M2 S2
    Year 13: Jan: FP1 June: M3 FP2 FP3
    All will be fine until you have to dredge out C2 knowledge in your FP3 exam I think you might get a bit bored too, especially only doing FP1 in January of Y13.
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    (Original post by SecondHand)
    All will be fine until you have to dredge out C2 knowledge in your FP3 exam I think you might get a bit bored too, especially only doing FP1 in January of Y13.
    Thanks! And I'll do my M2 and M3 a year early as to what I posted... And I'll have other subjects as well
    Physics
    Chemistry
    French
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    (Original post by shadab786ahmed)
    x
    I'm taking Physics, Chemistry and Biology as well. All of which are with AQA.

    I found Chemistry to be quite a smooth transition from GCSE, but also didn't find CHEM1 to all that interesting. It is really just the foundation stuff that they like to get out of the way, and to also get everyone on a level playing field as people will have had difference GCSE experiences (Triple Award, Double Award, etc.). CHEM2 was more interesting, as it was concerning physical chemistry.

    In Physics my teacher taught us PHYA2 first, and he did so because it is based around mechanics and is more fundamental for the course than PHYA1. PHYA2 was OK because it has mechanics and waves and stuff like that in it. PHYA1 is a really easy unit. It has electrical circuits in it and so that led to many an enjoyable practical and broke up the lessons from just being theory-based, as well as particles and quantum phenomena (which was interesting for me, as I had never really learned about it before).

    If you want any resources for WJEC, then I've got loads. I've got a file with all the past papers between 2006-2012, with proper worked solutions (not the nonsense they make you pay for in the official MS) and much more besides (tips and formulae sheets and standard proofs, etc.).
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    (Original post by Tullia)
    I'm taking Physics, Chemistry and Biology as well. All of which are with AQA.

    I found Chemistry to be quite a smooth transition from GCSE, but also didn't find CHEM1 to all that interesting. It is really just the foundation stuff that they like to get out of the way, and to also get everyone on a level playing field as people will have had difference GCSE experiences (Triple Award, Double Award, etc.). CHEM2 was more interesting, as it was concerning physical chemistry.

    In Physics my teacher taught us PHYA2 first, and he did so because it is based around mechanics and is more fundamental for the course than PHYA1. PHYA2 was OK because it has mechanics and waves and stuff like that in it. PHYA1 is a really easy unit. It has electrical circuits in it and so that led to many an enjoyable practical and broke up the lessons from just being theory-based, as well as particles and quantum phenomena (which was interesting for me, as I had never really learned about it before).

    If you want any resources for WJEC, then I've got loads. I've got a file with all the past papers between 2006-2012, with proper worked solutions (not the nonsense they make you pay for in the official MS) and much more besides (tips and formulae sheets and standard proofs, etc.).
    Thank you!! That was really helpful and gave me a lot of insight! I'll reply later as I'm getting ready for my first day of work experience, Cardiff University Engineering, thank you again!!
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    (Original post by Tullia)
    I'm taking Physics, Chemistry and Biology as well. All of which are with AQA.

    I found Chemistry to be quite a smooth transition from GCSE, but also didn't find CHEM1 to all that interesting. It is really just the foundation stuff that they like to get out of the way, and to also get everyone on a level playing field as people will have had difference GCSE experiences (Triple Award, Double Award, etc.). CHEM2 was more interesting, as it was concerning physical chemistry.

    In Physics my teacher taught us PHYA2 first, and he did so because it is based around mechanics and is more fundamental for the course than PHYA1. PHYA2 was OK because it has mechanics and waves and stuff like that in it. PHYA1 is a really easy unit. It has electrical circuits in it and so that led to many an enjoyable practical and broke up the lessons from just being theory-based, as well as particles and quantum phenomena (which was interesting for me, as I had never really learned about it before).

    If you want any resources for WJEC, then I've got loads. I've got a file with all the past papers between 2006-2012, with proper worked solutions (not the nonsense they make you pay for in the official MS) and much more besides (tips and formulae sheets and standard proofs, etc.).
    Chemistry: Were there any particularly difficult bits in the AS? Also do you have tips for the coursework as I hear people lose lots of marks

    Physics: Is it normal to do it that way around? Also were there any physics bits that aren't covered in maths? I thibk GCSE Physics is boring, can't wait...

    Also, regarding the WJEC resources would you be able to send me things when you're free
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    (Original post by shadab786ahmed)
    Chemistry: Were there any particularly difficult bits in the AS? Also do you have tips for the coursework as I hear people lose lots of marks

    Physics: Is it normal to do it that way around? Also were there any physics bits that aren't covered in maths? I thibk GCSE Physics is boring, can't wait...

    Also, regarding the WJEC resources would you be able to send me things when you're free
    No, AS Chemistry isn't difficult at all. The only difficulty with it is that there is a of of content compared to what you've probably come across at GCSE, but as long as you approach your learning in the right way then you'll be fine.

    For some people it can be a case of relearning everything, due to the oversimplification at GCSE of much of chemistry. But that depends on whether you've done Double Award or Triple Award Science.

    I would recommend that the Summer before you commence AS that you study some of the content so you've at least introduced yourself to it, and definitely revise independently as well, as your teacher will likely be rushed to complete the syllabus because there is so much content alongside practicals that you're expected to do.

    I think you're referring to the ISA, and if so then that really is the area where overall grades can be lost. My College isn't really representative, but there were only 3 people (myself included) that got an A on the ISA. The grade boundary last year for an A in the ISA was 46/50.

    As far as the ISA goes, then preparation really is just looking over all the past papers and being proactive in discussing whatever topic it ends up being on (usually one of the two set each year is based on a titration) with your teacher. You'll be told the topic for the ISA about a week before you actually do it, and so that's really the window of opportunity.

    No, it's normal to do PHYA1 and then PHYA2. I do think my teacher has it the correct way around though, as PHYA1 is ridiculously easy. By doing PHYA2 in January, you effectively get two attempts at the exam if you don't do well in it the first time around. Whereas, if you only do it in June then you can't afford to even have a bad day on the day of the exam.

    No, all of the Maths that you'll do in AS Physics will be straight forward. You do things like SUVAT equations and conservation of energy and work, and pretty much everything you'll have covered in M1.

    Sure. If you don't mind sending me your e-mail address via a PM, then I'll send them to you. I can't attach it in this thread because the files are too large.
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    (Original post by Tullia)
    No, AS Chemistry isn't difficult at all. The only difficulty with it is that there is a of of content compared to what you've probably come across at GCSE, but as long as you approach your learning in the right way then you'll be fine.

    For some people it can be a case of relearning everything, due to the oversimplification at GCSE of much of chemistry. But that depends on whether you've done Double Award or Triple Award Science.

    I would recommend that the Summer before you commence AS that you study some of the content so you've at least introduced yourself to it, and definitely revise independently as well, as your teacher will likely be rushed to complete the syllabus because there is so much content alongside practicals that you're expected to do.

    I think you're referring to the ISA, and if so then that really is the area where overall grades can be lost. My College isn't really representative, but there were only 3 people (myself included) that got an A on the ISA. The grade boundary last year for an A in the ISA was 46/50.

    As far as the ISA goes, then preparation really is just looking over all the past papers and being proactive in discussing whatever topic it ends up being on (usually one of the two set each year is based on a titration) with your teacher. You'll be told the topic for the ISA about a week before you actually do it, and so that's really the window of opportunity.

    No, it's normal to do PHYA1 and then PHYA2. I do think my teacher has it the correct way around though, as PHYA1 is ridiculously easy. By doing PHYA2 in January, you effectively get two attempts at the exam if you don't do well in it the first time around. Whereas, if you only do it in June then you can't afford to even have a bad day on the day of the exam.

    No, all of the Maths that you'll do in AS Physics will be straight forward. You do things like SUVAT equations and conservation of energy and work, and pretty much everything you'll have covered in M1.

    Sure. If you don't mind sending me your e-mail address via a PM, then I'll send them to you. I can't attach it in this thread because the files are too large.
    Thanks! That's good then, I'm self teaching myself triple science as everyone else does double.

    Yeah, that's what people called them, the ISAs thanks for all this advice!

    My chemistry teacher loves titrations :confused: it's like a small thing is it not?

    That's a good idea then! Maybe I should convince my Head of Science who is my form tutor to do it like that

    I'll PM you now thank you very much!!!
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    (Original post by shadab786ahmed)
    Thanks! That's good then, I'm self teaching myself triple science as everyone else does double.

    Yeah, that's what people called them, the ISAs thanks for all this advice!

    My chemistry teacher loves titrations :confused: it's like a small thing is it not?

    That's a good idea then! Maybe I should convince my Head of Science who is my form tutor to do it like that

    I'll PM you now thank you very much!!!
    Yes, the titrations are very straight forward and so as long as you just follow the instructions that you'll be given there will be no problem with performing the experiment correctly. You'll have plenty of practice before the real thing as well, and so you'll be at the stage where you're within the required 1% tolerance of your teachers titration readings to access all the accuracy marks for the ISA.

    I've sent you a PM explaining the e-mail situation. Let me know if you have another way of me sending them to you.
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    (Original post by Tullia)
    Yes, the titrations are very straight forward and so as long as you just follow the instructions that you'll be given there will be no problem with performing the experiment correctly. You'll have plenty of practice before the real thing as well, and so you'll be at the stage where you're within the required 1% tolerance of your teachers titration readings to access all the accuracy marks for the ISA.

    I've sent you a PM explaining the e-mail situation. Let me know if you have another way of me sending them to you.
    I shall follow the instructions to the dot! there will be no room for error!

    I've replied

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