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Why is law so popular?

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    (Original post by chelseafan)
    Are they? I've heard a law degree is tedious and boring.
    What you've heard is purely subjective. I love law. I find it interesting. I love learning about how my law progressed through-out history, how EU law is having an impact on it and I love reading the cases. You can't be bored when you're reading cases about snails and bottles.
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    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    People study it because they are too dumb to have any maths in their degree.
    I was in the top 10 students in my school according to grades, and I studied Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry and a couple of other A-levels, plus I missed out on the A* in FM for a few d@mn marks. I study Law now. Jus sayin
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    (Original post by DontWantYourBloodMoney)
    Boston Legal.



    ....Denny Crane.
    What A guy!
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    After studying at A-level it has cleared up any doubt in my mind that I don't want to do it for another 3 years.

    I guess it depends on what areas you study but it is so dry and boring it is terrible!
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    From the many people I know who take Law, they think they are going to become a millionaire top London lawyer a year out of university.
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    The Image
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    While a lot of people who do Law do it because they passionately want to become a lawyer or whatever else, many simply use it as a fall back for a lack of imagination. (I was on of these people a year back, luckily I realised it wasn't for me at this point)
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    (Original post by M1011)
    Interesting question.

    People mention transferable skills, which undoubtedly there are in a law degree, but I doubt it has more transferable skills then several other degrees. Hell, I'd be confident in saying a law degree has less transferable skills then the Business & Management degree I did to be quite honest, yet I don't doubt law is the more prestigious. Economics is one that always springs to mind for me when I think about 'transferable skills'.

    No the truth of the matter in my eyes is Law is oversubscribed because of reputation, not course content. There are those that want to be lawyers, and there are those that want to say 'I have a law degree'. The degree does have a very strong reputation, can't argue with that.
    You seem to be missing something here. You accept that Law has a strong, prestigious reputation, yet you think a Business and Management course offers greater transferable skills? Think about it, Law's reputation didn't spring up out of the ground from nowhere - the fact that it is known by people from all manner of different professions suggests that the quality of the transferable skills it offers is probably the best of any degree course.

    (Original post by M1011)
    While I don't disagree with you that a Law degree has transferable skills (see my post a few up from this one), I fail to see the logic behind people picking Law for that reason.

    There are other degrees with better transferable skills, simply because they mix qualitative and quantitative content. Sure law is a strong degree, but the question is why is it so oversubscribed, and I'm sorry but I refuse to believe it is because of the great 'transferable skills' because they simply aren't superior to many other degrees.

    It's prestige, pure and simple. People associate Law with being difficult and therefore assume the degree must be difficult to do (which it may well be, I've never done one so can't comment).
    There is absolutely sound logic behind choosing to study Law because of its transferable skills because it makes the degree versatile. So if you begin your degree not knowing what you want to do in life, Law is a great choice (provided you enjoy the course, which some don't) because it leaves many options open to you.
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    (Original post by thecrimsonidol)
    What modules have you done so far?
    All the compulsories obv. I have studied Family Law and Relationships (boring), Medicine and Ethics (people don't die quick enough, all this ranting and raving for long hours seem like a lifetime), Consumer Law (don't go to Woolworths then, some people), Employment Law (meh, we all get fired) ... so on and so forth.

    I am so bored and tired for law. I hate it. Find it boring and tedious. All I can say, don't choose law cos TV lies.
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    (Original post by Hippysnake)
    My son...
    Attachment 162069

    ...IS BARRISTERRRR. WHAT IS YOUR SON?
    Hahahahaha.
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    (Original post by chelseafan)
    Are they? I've heard a law degree is tedious and boring.
    Even if learning something is boring, it doesn't mean it's not useful.
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    Corporate law innit.
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    (Original post by Kenocide)
    You seem to be missing something here. You accept that Law has a strong, prestigious reputation, yet you think a Business and Management course offers greater transferable skills? Think about it, Law's reputation didn't spring up out of the ground from nowhere - the fact that it is known by people from all manner of different professions suggests that the quality of the transferable skills it offers is probably the best of any degree course.

    There is absolutely sound logic behind choosing to study Law because of its transferable skills because it makes the degree versatile. So if you begin your degree not knowing what you want to do in life, Law is a great choice (provided you enjoy the course, which some don't) because it leaves many options open to you.
    I'm not really trying to make a direct comparison between those two courses, as for one they quality of BaM differs hugely across different universities and I'm sure it must be similar for Law. My point though, is what are these 'transferable skills' that Law offers that other degrees don't that make it so oversubscribed? There's no quantitative side to a law degree is there? Surely that just makes it sound reasoning to assume there's more transferable skills from a degree which mixes qualitative with quantitative (think Economics if BaM offends you ).

    Perhaps I'm wrong, but I just don't see what these extra transferable skills are that make the degree so oversubscribed. For this reason I maintain my opinion that it isn't the content that makes the degree so well respected, it's the prestige. The reason for the prestige is obvious - people respect lawyers etcetera and recognise it's a difficult well paid career. Therefore they link the prestige of a 'law career' to a 'law degree'.

    Nothing at all wrong with that, and please don't see this as an attack on law degrees which clearly are very challenging, but I just don't see what these transferable skills are that explain why it is a more popular degree then any number of courses. It's prestige, pure and simple.
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    Because crime pays.

    That goes tenfold if you're a barrister.
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    (Original post by gethsemane342)
    Not everyone finds it boring - I've just graduated and I absolutely loved it. It was definitely the right choice for me. I do think you've got to be sure you'd enjoy it before you do it though because I can see why a lot of people would hate it
    (Original post by lyrical_lie)
    What you've heard is purely subjective. I love law. I find it interesting. I love learning about how my law progressed through-out history, how EU law is having an impact on it and I love reading the cases. You can't be bored when you're reading cases about snails and bottles.
    :ditto:

    I had no misconceptions about career prospects and course content when I choose Law. I just love the subject.

    (Original post by philistine)
    Because crime pays.

    That goes tenfold if you're a barrister.
    I was under the impression that for the majority of criminal barristers, crime doesn't pay. Or if it does, it's diddly-squat.
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    I'm not sure about Barristers, but for solicitors in criminal cases I think the majority are legal aid- which obviously is not a lot (in terms of solicitor pay per hour scale)
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    (Original post by M1011)
    I'm not really trying to make a direct comparison between those two courses, as for one they quality of BaM differs hugely across different universities and I'm sure it must be similar for Law. My point though, is what are these 'transferable skills' that Law offers that other degrees don't that make it so oversubscribed? There's no quantitative side to a law degree is there? Surely that just makes it sound reasoning to assume there's more transferable skills from a degree which mixes qualitative with quantitative (think Economics if BaM offends you ).

    Perhaps I'm wrong, but I just don't see what these extra transferable skills are that make the degree so oversubscribed. For this reason I maintain my opinion that it isn't the content that makes the degree so well respected, it's the prestige. The reason for the prestige is obvious - people respect lawyers etcetera and recognise it's a difficult well paid career. Therefore they link the prestige of a 'law career' to a 'law degree'.

    Nothing at all wrong with that, and please don't see this as an attack on law degrees which clearly are very challenging, but I just don't see what these transferable skills are that explain why it is a more popular degree then any number of courses. It's prestige, pure and simple.
    It's difficult to state exactly which transferable skills one acquires whilst studying Law as opposed to any other degree, not least because I haven't done any other degrees.

    As a Law student, my perception is this: the 'prestige' of a Law degree stems from the difficulty. The difficulty comes from the skills that you must have, most of which just happen to be very transferable. And, without sounding elitist about the course, I think if you drew up a list of transferable skills from the BaM or whatever other course you want to use as an example and compared it to that of a Law student there might not be much difference in quantity, but the thing is you must have all of those skills and you must use them with the utmost accuracy just to do well in Law.

    The Law is so technical, so convoluted and so very reliant upon precise definitions and exceptions (and exceptions to exceptions!) that you can easily misstate the law completely if you simply misread or misunderstand one word. And if the law you're analysing/discussing/applying isn't even correct then everything else you're saying is pretty much worthless.

    So again, without blowing the trumpet of my own degree, I think perhaps the difference between the transferable skills gained in the study of Law vs any old degree lie in the fact that employers in particular know that the Law graduate has had to apply all the necessary skills with consumate precision and rigour just to do well (ie 2:1), whereas this may not be the case to varying degree depending on what we're comparing it to.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    At times. However, it can be stressful and as dull as ditchwater. The law has been good to me, but I can't help feeling that I have had it better than those that are coming along now.
    Why is that?
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    (Original post by Legen...dary!!)
    I was in the top 10 students in my school according to grades, and I studied Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry and a couple of other A-levels, plus I missed out on the A* in FM for a few d@mn marks. I study Law now. Jus sayin
    There are always a few exceptions. I have it on good authority that many
    law students do want to avoid maths.

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