Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Mum kicking me out at 16 can i claim benefits?

Announcements Posted on
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    Good for them. But what can the person on a large salary do?

    The person on £15k could be satisfied with their life, you know, money isn't everything. :rolleyes:
    Exactly, money isn't everything, so stop moaning about taxes. Taxes are the price we pay for a civilised society.
    • 57 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by coopsyy)
    Exactly, money isn't everything, so stop moaning about taxes. Taxes are the price we pay for a civilised society.
    Where did I disagree with some tax? However, there is no economic argument for the 50% rate.

    "Money isn't everything" - I'd like to see you say that when you're earning money, then have the taxman steal your earnings to 'redistribute' it.

    My point was that although £15k is not a high income, the person receiving it may have a perfectly happy lifestyle and my question was why is it the person on £150k problem?
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    join the army AFC harrogate s great for 16 year olds
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    Where did I disagree with some tax? However, there is no economic argument for the 50% rate.

    "Money isn't everything" - I'd like to see you say that when you're earning money, then have the taxman steal your earnings to 'redistribute' it.

    My point was that although £15k is not a high income, the person receiving it may have a perfectly happy lifestyle and my question was why is it the person on £150k problem?
    People who earn extremely high incomes such as over £150,000 should pay their fair shair of tax. Maybe not 50%, but no less than 40%.

    I do earn money. I do pay tax. I have no problem with it. The taxman isn't 'stealing it'. If you want to live in this country and benefit from everything such as roads, schools, NHS etc you have to be willing to pay your tax and nic.

    Your point was that someone earning £150,000 has worked hard for their money and the taxman shouldn't take it. More than likely, the one earning £15,000 works a lot harder than the one earning 10x as much, yet doesn't moan about paying their share of tax.
    • 10 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    So back on topic and with helping this person with his problem..

    (Original post by A-Dog)
    If you get thrown out you will most likely get stuck in the cycle of benefits, unemployment and rubbish jobs, so it is not worth it.
    It's true. I had a rubbish teenage life at home with all the family problems I had. I was kicked out several times which really disrupted my education and my life. Aren't you at College? If not you should really get yourself to one, study hard and get yourself to university, I wish I had because I definitely hit that dead end a few years later. I've only just applied to an access course at 19 now so hopefully I'll be back on track soon but I wish so much time hadn't been wasted, you know?

    Anyway, with the benefits/housing problem, at 16 I was told I wasn't entitled to anything (which is true, you have to be 18 to claim JSA). They say under "special circumstances", which means that if you have no one and I mean NO ONE that can support you, if you are literally in a cardboard box on the street, then you can get it. Because at 16, someone has to be supporting you. I lived with family and my boyfriend for a while until things settled at home and it feels awful having to rely on people but it's all you can do, as you're unlikely to even find a job at 16 and if you do, it's going to be underpaid and crap - besides, dead end jobs is not something you want to get yourself stuck with. Just try to get through it and concentrate on education, that's my advice
    • 57 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by coopsyy)
    Your point was that someone earning £150,000 has worked hard for their money and the taxman shouldn't take it. More than likely, the one earning £15,000 works a lot harder than the one earning 10x as much, yet doesn't moan about paying their share of tax.
    Do you have evidence to support this?
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    Do you have evidence to support this?
    Do you have evidence to support that the one earning £150,000 works harder? Didn't think so.

    Someone who earns say £15,000 for working full time as a cleaner, labourer, bin man, gardener or even a farmer, in my opinion works a hell of a lot harder than someone sitting behind a desk dwiddling their thumbs delegating work.
    • 57 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by coopsyy)
    Do you have evidence to support that the one earning £150,000 works harder? Didn't think so.

    Someone who earns say £15,000 for working full time as a cleaner, labourer, bin man, gardener or even a farmer, in my opinion works a hell of a lot harder than someone sitting behind a desk dwiddling their thumbs delegating work.
    Anyone could do those jobs, it's based on demand/supply.

    :rolleyes: the person 'sitting behind a desk dwiddling their thumbs' still performs an important role and it is a stressful job.
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    Anyone could do those jobs, it's based on demand/supply.

    :rolleyes: the person 'sitting behind a desk dwiddling their thumbs' still performs an important role and it is a stressful job.
    Anyone could be a farmer? :rolleyes: Evidently you don't realise how hard and physical this job is, and how stressfull it is. Not just anyone can do this job. Could you AI? Could you do foot trimming? Could you do heat detection? Could you plough a field? Could you milk a cow? Could you fix a tractor when it breaks? Could you do hay karting? Could you help a ewe that is having a difficult birth? The list goes on. Slightly off topic i know, but seriosuly, how naive are you to think that anyone could do any low paid job?

    And as for someone sitting behing a desk, yes it could be an important role and it could be stressful. But so could many low paid jobs. And personally i'd say being a farmer is one of the most important jobs in the country. They supply food for the nation.
    • 52 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    This is sad news
    • 13 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by adam321)
    Because i have ptsd so i smash things up and get really angry ect.
    I concur. Your Avatar clearly adds to your descriptions
    • 3 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by fudgesundae)


    I highly doubt that.

    Any benefits over minimum wage are just ridiculous. I also don't think that those capable of working should simply get their benefits. Earn them, I'm sure there are plenty of little jobs the government could have people doing.
    This, I'm afraid, illustrates that you have not done your research. People are on benefit for a variety of reasons, many are disabled, others are women with young children whose former partners are not prepared to help support their children. Those capable of working who are on benefits often go on and off benefits as they gain and lose work. They pax tax when working and claim when not. There are a number of people on benefit who have never worked, it's smaller than the newspapers would have you believe. I sugegst you do some research here http://www.poverty.org.uk/08/index.shtml

    OP - my apologies for extending the off topic debate, those who wish to continue to do so should start their own thread. I'm afraid the mis-informed comment annoyed me. I do hope that you have been to social services and are receiving help. You will find it difficult to get and hold a job or to keep accommodation while you have anger issues, you will need benefit but you need counselling even more to help you deal with what is holding you back. You can not change what has happened but you can change your attitude to it and prevent it from continuing to disrupt your life.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by parentlurker)
    This, I'm afraid, illustrates that you have not done your research. People are on benefit for a variety of reasons, many are disabled,
    Show me where I said that there weren't disabled people on benefits please? I have said throughout the thread that I agree with benefits for those who cannot help themselves (i.e. those who are disabled).

    others are women with young children whose former partners are not prepared to help support their children.
    So single mothers are incapable of supporting a child?

    Those capable of working who are on benefits often go on and off benefits as they gain and lose work. They pax tax when working and claim when not.
    They probably still take more out of the system than they put in.

    There are a number of people on benefit who have never worked, it's smaller than the newspapers would have you believe.
    I never said that most people on benefits were scroungers that didn't want to work. I can imagine that it is a significant proportion of them though.

    You seem to have completely ignored the post I quoted though, my post was about benefits never paying more than minimum wage.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by fudgesundae)
    So single mothers are incapable of supporting a child?
    Many single mothers would not be making enough money if they worked to support themselves and their child. Childcare costs are extortionate, and that alone could be enough to consume 90% of the mother's earnings. A daycare nursery - for instance - could charge £40 per day for a child. Not to mention the fact that, by working, the mother would likely forfeit her free council tax and housing benefit, among other things.

    I completely agree with the idea that we need to make work pay. Until that happens though we cannot simply forget about the people who rely on welfare. As unfortunate that it is, and as unsavoury some of these 'mothers' are, I'd sure not like to see them and their children homeless. Which leads onto the OP's point.

    OP your mother should be utterly ashamed of herself. It only worsens the scenario that you have some disorder. People need to stand up and take their responsibilities seriously. Given your clear need for support - both financial and otherwise - you should be receiving care until you are capable of standing on your own two feet. If you were my child you would have a stable environment to progress into the adult world safely. Good luck with whatever you decide to do.
    • 3 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    OP - if you are able to ignore the unhelpful digressions on this thread and are still reading - I came across a suggestion recently that low dose naltroxene may be helpful in PTSD. I would suggest you ask your doctors about this as dealing with the PTSD is something that would allow you to have a much better life.

    If your mother sees there is a prospect of treatment she might not throw you out. LDN can sometimes be obtained on private prescription if your doctors don't consider it worth trying.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I'm in the same situation here. I have a job, which is above minimum wage for my age, yet I still cannot afford to put myself somewhere to live. I don't have any sort of income apart from wages which would barely help buy my food. So don't be so quick to judge.
    • 10 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Please check the date of a thread before posting.
Updated: June 13, 2013
New on TSR

Find out what year 11 is like

Going into year 11? Students who did it last year share what to expect.

Article updates
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.